(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Maryland Statistical Abstract"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/marylandstatisti1977nnary 



m4^ymnd 

Sp4TISTIQIL 



1977 



MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



The 1977 edition of the Maryland Statistical Abstract was prepared 
by the Division of Research of the Department, PADRAIC P. FRUCHT, Director 
of Research. NEIL M. SHPRITZ, Chief of Business Research, was responsible 
for general supervision and compilation, ably assisted by IRENE TASHLICK. 
DINAH AARON and CRAIG MERKLE, summer student interns, who worked long and 
hard hours on this project, provided valuable service in collecting and 
organizing data. PATRICIA PARKS had primary responsibility for clerical 
operations. 

Funding for the summer student interns was provided by the Office 
of Development Planning of this Department, and that Office's cooperation 
is deeply appreciated. 

We thank the many contributors to this volume. Notes below each table 
credit its sources. Where indicated, contributors have requested copyright 
protection. Permission to use copyright material must be obtained directly 
from each source so cited. 



It77 



state qf|f^ 



j<^^ yiepartment of 

Economic & 
Community 

>^ -development 

Office of the Secretary 

2525 Riva Road. Annapolis, Maryland 21401 • 301-269-J174 




Blair Lee III 

Acting Governor 
Herbert B Cahan 

Secretary 



January 31, 1978 



The Honorable Blair Lee III 
Acting Governor of Maryland 
State House 
Annapolis, Maryland 21404 

Dear Governor Lee: 

I am pleased to transmit to you the "1977 Maryland Statistical 
Abstract", which was prepared and published by the Department as part of 
its continuing effort to maintain, on as current a basis as feasible, a 
data base on which sound decisions affecting the welfare of our citizens 
can be made by government and private enterprise. 

We update this publication every two years, thus providing a 
statistical record of the composition, changes and trends in population, 
incomes and employment in business and industry, governmental receipts 
and expenditures, agriculture, natural resources, and many other aspects 
of life in Maryland. Hopefully, State and local government agencies, 
individuals, and business firms will find the data useful to them. 

We believe this edition to be the most complete compendium of 
State data yet produced in Maryland. In updating and expanding the 
coverage of the last Statistical Abstract, we have added many pages of 
newly developed data and a special table of "highlights". Also, in the 
Appendix to this volume, we have reproduced a number of historical time 
series, by month, of significant economic indicators. 

Great care has been taken to insure the usefulness and accuracy 
of this publication. As with previous editions, this report has benefited 
from suggestions and comments from interested users. We anticipate a con- 
tinuation of such support in the future. 



Sincerely, 
Herbert B. Cahan 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

POLITICAL SUBDIVISION MAP OF MARYLAND 1 

Table No. 

1 Geographical Regions of Maryland Grouped by Political 
Subdivisions 2 

la Maryland Highlights 3 

POPULATION AND VITAL STATISTICS 6 

2 Population; State of Maryland and Political Subdivisions, 

Rank by Per Cent of Change: 1976 and 1970 8 

3 Population of the 50 States and the District of Columbia 

Rank by Per Cent of Change: 1976 and 1970 9 

4 Population Density in the United States, by State: 1975 . . 11 

5 Population Density of Maryland Subdivisions; Ranked by 

Density: July, 1976 12 

6 Maryland Population Growth: 1880-1976 13 

7 Components of Population Change Due to Migration and 

Natural Increase by Political Subdivision: 1970-1974 ... 14 

8 Migration to and from Maryland: 1965-1970 

by State 15 

9 Population, State of Maryland, by Race and Political Sub- 
division: July 1975 and April 1, 1970 17 

10 Estimated Maryland Population by Sex and Race and 

Detailed Age Group, July 19 75 18 

11 Comparative Population Estimates and Vital Statistics Data, 

by Race for Maryland Regions: 1975 19 

12 Estimated White Population, by Age Group and Political 
Subdivision: July 1, 19 75 20 

13 Estimated Maryland Nonwhite Population, by Age Group and 
Political Subdivision: July 1, 1975 21 



Table No. 



Page 



14 Marriage by Resident Status and Type of Ceremony, by 

Political Subdivision of Occurrence: 1975 22 

15 Birth and Birth Rates by Race for Maryland and Political 
Subdivisions: 1975 23 

16 Absolute Divorces and Annulments by Legal Grounds for 

Decree and Political Subdivisions of Occurrence: 1975 .... 24 

17 Selected Mortality Data by Race, Maryland and the United 

States: 1972-1975 25 

18 Deaths for Ten Leading Causes, by Sex and Race, 

Maryland: 19 75 26 

19 Deaths and Death Rates by Race for Maryland and Political 
Subdivisions: 1975 27 

EDUCATION 28 

20 Number of Public Schools in Maryland, by Political Sub- 
division: September 30, 1976 29 

21 Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools, All Levels, 
Maryland: 1976, 19 75 and 19 74 30 

22 Number of Pupils Attending Public Schools in Maryland, 

by Political Subdivision: 1971, 1975, 1976 31 

23 Average Number of Pupils Belonging per Teacher and 
Principal, Maryland Public Schools, by Political Sub- 
division: 1975-1976 School Year 32 

24 Elementary and Secondary Teachers and Principals in 
Maryland Public Schools, by Political Subdivision: 

1974 and 1977 33 

25 Cost per Pupil Belonging: Current Expenses, Maryland Public 
Schools, by Political Subdivision: 1975-1976 School Year . . 34 

26 Average Salary per Teacher and Principal, Maryland Public 
Schools, by Political Subdivision: 1975-1976 School Year . . 35 

27 Holding Power of Public High Schools in flaryland, by 

Political Subdivision: 1976 and 1974 36 

28 Public High School Graduates in Maryland and Per Cent 
Intending to Continue Education, by Political Subdivision: 

1976, 1974 and 1969 37 

29 Source of Current Funds and Disbursements, Maryland 

Public Schools: School Year 19 75-1976 38 



Table No. Page 

30 Capital Expenditures, Maryland Public Schools, by 

Political Subdivision: 1975-1976 School Year 39 

31 Enrollment in State Accredited Two Year Colleges: 1976 ... 40 

32 Enrollment in State Accredited Four Year Colleges and 
Universities: 1976 41 

33 Four Year State Accredited Colleges and Universities 

in Maryland: 1976 43 

HEALTH SERVICES 45 

34a Distribution of Physicians, and Number of Beds in Hospitals 

in Maryland, by Political Subdivision 46 

34b Patient Population, State Psychiatric Inpatient Facilities, 

Fiscal Years 1973-1977 47 

CLIMATE OF MARYLAND 48 

35a Location of Maryland Weather Stations for Which Clima- 

tological Data are Presented 50 

35b Spring and Fall Freeze Data Based on Thirty Year Periods 
1931-1960 and 1941-19 70, and Average Length of Freeze- 
Free Periods 52 

35c Average Temperature, Precipitation and Snowfall at Selected 

Locations Within the State of Maryland: 1941-1970 55 

35d Average Tenperature, Precipitation and Snowfall at Selected 

Locations Within the State of Maryland: 1931-1960 65 

35e Cloud Cover Conditions in Maryland, Sunrise to Sunset, by 
Region, Normal Annual Period and 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 
1976, January - March 1977 68 

NATURAL RESOURCES 70 

36 Commercial Forest Land Area by Stand-Size Class in Maryland 
and Neighboring States and the Continental United States: 

1970 71 

37 Forest Land Area in Maryland and Neighboring States and 

the Continental United States: 1970 71 

38 Commercial Forest Land Ownership by Type of Owner in 
Maryland and Neighboring States and the Continental United 
States: 1970 72 



Table No. Page 

39 Net Volume of Growing Stock and Sawtimber on Commercial 
Forest Land by Ownership and Net Annual Growth in Maryland 
and Neighboring States and the Continental United 

States: 1970 73 

40 Net Volume of Live Sawtimber in Sawtimber Stands on 
Commercial Forest Land in Maryland and Neighboring States 

and the Continental United States: 1970 74 

41 Net Volume of Sawtimber on Commercial Timberland in Maryland, 

by Species as of January 1, 1970 75 

42 Annual Cut and Net Annual Growth of Growing Stock on 

Commercial Forest Land, Maryland, by Species Group: 19 70 . . 76 

43 Annual Cut and Net Annual Growth of Live Sawtimber on 
Commercial Forest Land, Maryland, by Species Group: 19 70 . . 76 

44 Volume of Forest Products Harvested in Maryland: 1975 ... 77 

45 Number of Forest Fires and Area Burned in Maryland, by 
Political Subdivision: Years 1976 and 1974 78 

46 Forest Fires in Maryland by Cause, by Political Subdivision: 

1976 79 

47 Number of Commercial Fishermen and Gear in Maryland: 

1974, 1972 and 1970 80 

48 Fish Catch in Maryland, by Quantity: 1974, 1975 and 1976 . . 81 

49 Fish Catch in Maryland, by Value: 1974, 1975 and 1976 .... 83 

50 Seafood Processed Products, Maryland: 1975, 19 74, and 19 70 . 85 

51 Hunting and Fishing License Sales, Maryland: Fiscal Years 
1973-1976 86 

52 Mineral Production in Maryland: 1974, 1973 and 1972 87 

53 Value of Mineral Production in Maryland, by Political 
Subdivision: 1974, 1973 88 

LABOR FORCE, EJIPLOYMENT, AND UNEMPLOYMENT 89 

54 Civilian Labor Force , Total Employment and Unemployment 
in Maryland by Region and Political Subdivision: 19 76 

by Place of Residence 91 

55 Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Annual Average Employment 

in Maryland: 1976, 1975 and 1974 by Place of Work 92 



Table No. Page 

56 Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Annual Average Employment 
Baltimore SMSA: 1976, 1975, and 1974 by Place of Work .... 93 

57 Percentage Distribution of Nonagricultural Wage and 
Salary Employment in Maryland: 1976, 1975 and 1974 

by Place of Work , 94 

58 Nonagricultural, Non-Manufacturing Wage and Salary Annual 
Average Employment in Maryland: 1974 and 1976 

by Place of Work 95 

59 Percentage Distribution in Major Categories of Non- 
agricultural Wage and Salary Employment by Political 
Subdivision and the Baltimore SMSA: 1975 by Place of Work . . 96 

60 Percentage Distribution of Major Categories of Selected 
Nonmanufacturing Employment: 1974 by Political Subdivision . 97 

61 Federal Civilian Employment by Political Subdivision: 

December 31, 1975 98 

62 Resident Population in Relation to Federal Employment: 1975 . 99 

63 Proportion of Labor Force Working Outside County of 

Residence: 1960 and 1970 100 

64 Destination of Commuters, by Political Subdivision: 1970 , . 101 

65 Armed Services Personnel in Maryland and United States: 
September 30, 1975 107 

66 Weekly Average of State Insured Unemployed, by Industry 
Attachment and by Sex: Fiscal Years 1975 and 1976 108 

67 Department of Employment Security, Summary of State 

Activities: Fiscal Years 1975, 1976 109 

68 Nonagricultural Employment Service Activities Relating to 

All Persons and Veterans Fiscal Years 1976 and 1975 110 

69 Distribution of Maryland and State Employees, by Political 
Subdivision: April 1977 Ill 

70 Distribution of Maryland State Roads Commission Employees, 

by Working Locations: June 1977 112 

71 Work Stoppages in Maryland and United States: 1970-1976 . . . 113 



Table No. Page 

MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLLS 114 

72 Number of Employees in Manufacturing, 

Maryland and Selected Other Areas: 1958-1973 115 

73 Manufacturing Emplojmient in Maryland by Standard Industrial 
Classification, by Place of Work, Annual Averages: 1972, 

1974 and 1976 Ranked by Number of Employees in 1976 116 

74 Manufacturing Employment in the Baltimore SMSA by Selected 
Standard Industrial Classification Annual Averages: 1972, 

1974, 1976 Ranked by Number of Employees in 1976 117 

75 Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Payrolls in Maryland: 

1976, 1975 and 1973 118 

76 Manufacturing Payrolls in Maryland, Rank by Dollar Value 

in 1975: 1975 and 1972 119 

77 Number of Manufacturing Firms in Maryland, by Political 
Subdivision: 1976, 1970, 1960, 1950 120 

78 Manufacturing Payrolls, Maryland and Selected Eastern 

States, Regionally Ranked by Rate of Growth: 1971 and 1976 . 121 

79 Number of Employees Engaged in Manufacturing, Maryland 
and Selected Eastern States, Regionally Ranked by Rate 

of Growth in Total Employees: 1968 and 1973 122 

80 Value Added by Manufacture, Maryland and Selected Eastern 
States, Regionally Ranked by Rate of Growth: 1968 and 

1973 123 

81 Value Added by Principal Manufacturing Industries in 

Maryland, Rank by Dollar Volume: 1967 and 1973 124 

82 Average Weekly and Average Hourly Earnings in Manufacturing 
Industries in Maryland by Place of Work: 1976 and 1972, 

Rank by 1976 Dollar Value of Average Weekly Earning 125 

TRADE 126 

83 Trade Activity in Maryland, Establishments with Payroll 

Only: 1972 127 

84 Trade Activity in Maryland, Number of Establishments and 

Total Sales or Receipts: 1972 and 1967 128 

85 Maryland Retail Trade, by Political Subdivision: 1972 .... 130 



Table No. Page 

86 Maryland Retail Trade, by Political Subdivision: 1967 .... 131 

87 Maryland Wholesale Trade, by Political Subdivision: 1972 . . 132 

88 Maryland Wholesale Trade, by Political Subdivision: 1967 . . 133 

Note Concerning Comparability of the 1967 and 19 72 Censuses 

of Selected Service Industries 134 

89 Selected Services in Maryland by Political Subdivision: 

1972 135 

90 Selected Services in Maryland by Political Subdivision: 

1967 136 

91 Number of Establishments, by Selected Kind-Of-Business 
Groups Maryland Selected Services by Political Subdivision: 

1972 137 

92 Number of Establishments, by Kind of Business Group, 
Maryland Selected Services by Political Subdivision with 

300 or More Establishments: 1972 138 

93 Number of Establishments, by Kind of Business Group, 

Maryland Selected Services, by Political Subdivision: 1967 . 139 

PERSONAL INCOME 140 

94 Gross State Product, Maryland, Current and Constant 

Dollars: 1950-1976 141 

95 Total Personal Income, United States and the 51 Political 
Jurisdictions, Rank Order: 1976 142 

96 Per Capita Income by Jurisdiction and the United States, 

Rank Order: 1976 143 

97 Total Personal Income, Maryland and Selected Eastern 

States: 1976 and 1971 144 

98 Per Capita Income, Maryland and Selected Eastern States: 

1976 and 1971 145 

99 Personal Income by Major Source, Maryland: 1976 and 1973 . . 146 

100 Personal Income and Per Capita Personal Income, by 

Political Subdivision: 1975 and 1969 147 

101 Net Effective Buying Income Rank Order for States: 1976 . . . 148 



Table No. Page 

102 Buying Power, by Political Subdivision: 1976 149 

103 Median Household Effective Buying Income, by Political 
Subdivision: 1976 149 

104 Estimated Per Capita and Average Household Effective 
Buying Income by Political Subdivision, Ranked by Per 

Capita Effective Buying Income: 1976 150 

105 Average Household Effective Buying Income, Maryland and 

Selected Eastern States: 1976 151 

106a Retail Sales Per Household Rank Order for States: 1976 ... 152 

106b Retail Sales in Maryland, by Political Subdivision: 1976 . . 153 

107 Number of Households by Highest and Lowest Income Group 
for the United States, Maryland and Selected Eastern 

States: 1976 154 

108 Families Below Poverty Level in Maryland by Political 
Subdivision: 1969 155 

109 Transfer Payments by State for 1965, 1970, and 1975 156 

CITY WORKER'S FAMILY BUDGET 160 

110 Consumer Price Indices U. S. , Baltimore, Md. , and 

Washington, D. C. Metropolitan Areas: 19 72-1976 161 

111 Urban Worker's Family Budget, Baltimore Metropolitan Area 

and Selected U. S. Metropolitan Areas: Autumn 1976 161 

112 Food Component of Consumer Price Index, Baltimore SMSA 

and United States: Jan., 1972 - Aug., 1977 162 

113 Indices of Average Earnings of Workers in Selected 
Occupational Groups, and Relative Advance in 29 Metro- 
politan Areas: March 1974 - July 1975 163 

STATE FINANCE 164 

114 Total Receipts and Total Available Revenues, Maryland: 

Fiscal Years 1972, 1974, 1976 165 

115 Retail Sales Tax Receipts, Maryland, Rank Order by Major 

Class of Business: Fiscal Year 1976 166 

116 Retail Sales Tax Receipts by Major Categories, 

by Political Subdivision: Fiscal Year 1976 167 



Table No. Page 

117 Retail Sales and Use Tax Receipts, by Subdivision: 

Fiscal Years 19 71 and 1976 168 

118 Total Expenditures, Maryland: Fiscal Years 1972, 1974, 1976 . 169 

119 Percentage Distribution of Local Government Revenues and 
Current Expenses: Fiscal Year 19 76, by Political 

Subdivision 170 

120 General Revenue Sharing Payments to Maryland, Baltimore 
City and All Counties: Entitlement Period 8 and 

Entitlement Periods 1-7 172 

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 173 

121 All Active Banks in Maryland, Summary of Assets and 
Liabilities: 1971, 1973, and 1975 174 

122 All Active National Banks in Maryland, Summary of 

Assets and Liabilities: 1971, 1973, and 1975 175 

123 All Active State Banks and Trust Companies in Maryland, 

Summary of Assets and Liabilities: 1971, 1973, and 1975 . . . 176 

124 All Active Mutual Savings Banks in Maryland, Summary 

of Assets and Liabilities: 1971, 1973, and 1975 176 

125 Credit Unions in Maryland: 1971, 1973, and 1975 177 

126 Consumer Loan and Small Loan Licensees in Maryland: 

1975 and 1976 177 

127 Combined Statement of Condition of All Building, Savings, 
and Loan Associations Domiciled in Maryland as of December 

31, 1976 178 

LIFE INSURANCE 180 

128 Life Insurance in Force in Maryland: 1976 181 

129 Purchases of Ordinary Life Insurance, Maryland: 1970-1976 . . 181 
MASS MEDIA 182 

130 Television Stations in Maryland: 1977 184 

131 Television Broadcast Revenues, Expenses and Income by 

Market, Baltimore and Washington, D. C. : 1976 184 

132 AM and AM/FM Broadcast Revenues, Expenses and Income, 

tiaryland and Baltimore Metropolitan Area: 1975 185 



Table No. Page 

133 AM Radio Stations in Maryland: 1977 186 

134 FM Radio Stations in Maryland: 19 77 188 

135 Dally and Weekly Newspapers of General Circulation in 

I'laryland: 1977 190 

136 Newspaper Circulation by Source of Daily Paper, 

by Political Subdivision: 1976-1977 193 

COURTS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 194 

137 Number of Judges, Population and Case Load Per Judge, 
Maryland Circuit Courts, by Political Subdivision: 

Fiscal Year 1976 196 

138 Cases Filed in Circuit Courts, Maryland: Fiscal Years 

1974 and 1976 197 

139 Average Time Intervals, Dispositions of Appeals, Maryland 

Court of Appeals, in Months: 1962-1975 198 

140 Average Time Lapse in Months, Criminal Cases, State of 
Maryland: 1967-1974 199 

141 United States District Court for Maryland, Civil and 
Criminal Cases and Bankruptcy, Administrative, and 

Citizenship Matters: Fiscal Years 1974 and 1976 200 

142 Offenses of Persons Committed to State Institutions: 

Fiscal 1976 201 

143 Jurisdictions from which Committed Persons were Received: 

Fiscal Year 1976 202 

144 Age Groups of Committed Persons, All Adult Institutions: 

Fiscal Year 1976 203 

145 Lengths of Sentences of Committed Persons, All Adult 
Institutions: Fiscal Year 1976 203 

146 Disposition of All Juvenile Court Cases, by Political 
Subdivision: Fiscal Years 1972, 1974 and 1976 204 

147 Maryland Circuit Court Juvenile Dispositions: Fiscal 1976 . . 205 

148 Average Daily Total Population of Juvenile Institutions, 

by Institution: March 19 76 and March 1977 206 

149 Capacity, Average Daily Population and Annual Per Capita 
Costs of Adult Correctional Institutions by Institution: 

Fiscal Year 1976 206 

SOCIAL SERVICES 207 



Table No. Page 

150 Net Expenditures for Social Services Administration by 

Funding and by Local Department: Fiscal Year 1976 208 

151 Selected Social Services Administration Expenditures: 

Fiscal Years 1975 and 1976 209 

152 Per Cent and Source of Funds by Type of Expenditure, 

Selected Programs: Fiscal Years 1975 and 1976 210 

153 Selected Social Services Caseload for Maryland and 
Baltimore City: Monthly Average for Fiscal Years 1975 

and 1976 211 

154 Food Stamp Distribution: July 1, 1975 - June 1976 212 

155 Administrative Expenditures for the Employment Security 
Administration by Program: Fiscal Years 1975 and 1976 .... 213 

ENERGY 214 

156 Retail Fuel and Utilities Component of Consumer Price 
Index, Baltimore SMSA and United States: Jan., 1971 - 

July 1977 215 

157 Gas Utility Industry, Customers and Revenues, Maryland: 
1970-1976 and 1966 216 

158 Natural Gas Consumption, in the United States, South 
Atlantic Region, Maryland and District of Columbia: 

1973, 1974, 1975 217 

159 Installed Generating Capacity and Production of Electric 
Utilities and Installed Plants by Class of Ownership and 

Type of Prime Mover, Maryland: 1974 and 1976 218 

160 Commercial and Industrial Electric Sales in Maryland: 

1966-1976 219 

161 Gross Gallons of Motor Gasoline Sold, Maryland and the 

United States: 1972-1976 220 

162 Regular, Unleaded Regular and Premium Gasoline Retail 
Sales, Prices, Baltimore SMSA and United States: January 

1975 - July 1977 221 

163 Telephone System in Maryland, Selected Data: 1972, 1974, 

and 1976 222 

PORT OF BALTIMORE 223 

164 Import and Export Tonnage and Value, Port of Baltimore: 
1967-1976 224 



Table No. Page 

165 Import Trade of the Port of Baltimore Arranged by 

Principal Countries and by Trade Areas: 1976 225 

166 Export Trade of the Port of Baltimore Arranged by 

Principal Countries and by Trade Areas: 1976 226 

167 Ranking of Principal United States Seaports in Foreign 
Waterbome Trade, Import Tonnage: 1974, 1975 and 1976 .... 227 

168 Ranking of Principal United States Seaports in Foreign 
Waterbome Trade, Import Value: 1974, 1975 and 1976 227 

169 Ranking of Principal United States Seaports in Foreign 
Waterbome Trade, Export Tonnage: 1974, 1975 and 1976 .... 228 

170 Ranking of Principal United States Seaports in Foreign 
Waterbome Trade, Export Value: 1974, 1975 and 1976 228 

171 Value of Principal Categories of Commodities Exported 

from and Imported into the Port of Baltimore: 1976 ..... 229 

172 Leading Commodities in Waterbome Commerce, Baltimore 

Harbor and Channels, in Short Tons: 1974 230 

173 Waterbome Commerce of the Principal Waterways in 

Maryland, in Short Tons: 1967 and 1974 231 

174 Waterbome Commerce of the Baltimore Harbor and 

Channels, in Short Tons: 1964-1974 232 

AIR TRAVEL 2 33 

175 Baltimore-Washington International Airport Operations: 

1972 and 1976 234 

176 Commercial Airports and Heliports in the State of 

Maryland, by Political Subdivision: 1977 235 

MOTOR VEHICLES 236 

177 Motor Vehicle-Related Employment in Maryland and the 

United States 237 

178 New Motor Vehicle Registration and Number of Licensed 

Drivers in Maryland: 1975 and 1976 237 

179 Motor Vehicle Registration in Maryland, by Type and 

Political Subdivision: 1976 and 1977 238 

180 Average Daily Vehicle Miles, State Maintained Roads: 

1974 and 1976 239 



Table No. Page 

181 Traffic Volume at Toll Facilities in Maryland, Annual 

Totals: 1966-1976 240 

182 Highway Mileages Between Selected Locations in Maryland . . . 2A1 

183 Total Highway Mileage by Type of System in Maryland: 

1974 and 1976 242 

AGRICULTURE 243 

184 Cash Receipts from Farming, Maryland: 1973, 1974 

and 1975 244 

185 Selected Commodities Indices, Prices F^eceived by Farmers, 
Maryland: 1969-1976 246 

186 Number of Farms and Lands in Farms, Maryland: 1968-1977 . . . 246 

187 Workers on Farms in Maryland: 1972-1976 246 

188 Livestock and Poultry in Maryland, Number on Farms: 

1974-1977 247 

189 Livestock and Poultry in Maryland, Value by Species: 

1974-1977 249 

HOUSING AND CONSTRUCTION 250 

190 Selected Characteristics of Housing in Maryland, by 

Political Subdivision: 1970 251 

191 Value of Construction Contract Awards, United States 

and Maryland: 1974-1976 and 1967 252 

192 New Building Permits for Private and Public Residential 

Dwelling Units Authorized in Maryland: 1967-1976 252 

193 Annual Value of Non-Residential and Residential 

Construction Contracts Awarded in Maryland: 1965-1976 .... 253 

194 Mobile Home Shipments into Maryland: 1960-1976 254 

REAL ESTATE 255 

195 Number of Real Properties and Real Property Assessed 

Values, by Political Subdivision: 1978 256 

196 Real Property Assessment Level Ratios, by Political 
Subdivision: 1973-1975 and 1969 257 



Table No. Page 

197 Real Property Leased to the Federal Government in 

Maryland: 1974 and 1976 258 

198 Federally Owned Real Property in Maryland: 1974 and 19 76 . . 258 
FEDERAL OUTLAYS IN MARYLAND 259 

199 Relative Position of the State: FY 1976 260 

200 Functional Summary of Federal Outlays, Maryland: FY 1976 . . 261 

201 Federal Outlays in Maryland, by Political Subdivision: 

FY 1976 263 

202 Political Subdivision Summary of Federal Outlays by 

Agency: FY 1976 264 

203 Federal Expenditures by Functional Category in the 

Appalachian Portion of Maryland: FY 1976 2 70 

ELECTIONS 271 

204 Voter Registration in Maryland, by Party and Political 
Subdivision: December 31, 1976 272 

205 Maryland General Election Returns - November 2, 1976 

For President of the United States 273 

206 Maryland General Election Returns - November 5, 1974 

For Governor of Maryland 274 

207 Maryland General Election Returns - November 5, 1974 

For United States Senator 275 

208 Maryland General Election Returns - November 2, 1976 

For United States Senator 276 

209 Maryland General Election Returns - November 2, 1976 

For Representative in the 95th Congress of the United States . 278 

RECREATION AREAS 2 79 

210 Recreation Homes, by Political Subdivisions: 1970 280 

211 Open Land and Selected Recreation Facilities 281 



Table No. Page 

STATISTICAL APPENDIX 

NOTES TO STATISTICAL APPENDIX A-1 

A-1 Maryland Total Civilian Workforce, by Month, Unadjusted 

and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1970 - December 1977 .... A-2 

A-2 Maryland Employment, by Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally 

Adjusted: January 1970 - December 1977 A-3 

A-3 Maryland Unemployment, by Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally 

Adjusted: January 1970 - December 1977 A-4 

A-4 Maryland Unemployment Rate, by Month, Unadjusted and 

Seasonally Adjusted: January 1970 - December 1977 A-5 

A-5 Maryland Manufacturing Employment, by Month, Unadjusted 

and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1970 - December 1977 .... A-6 

A-6 Maryland Durable Goods Manufacturing Employment, by Month, 
Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 
December 1977 A-7 

A-7 Maryland Nondurable Goods Manufacturing Employment, by 

Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 
December 1977 A-8 

A-8 Maryland Nonmanufacturing Employment, by Month, 

Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 

December 1977 A-9 

A-9 Maryland Contract Construction Employment, by Month, 
Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 
December 1977 A-10 

A-10 Maryland Transportation and Public Utilities Employment, by 
Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 
December 1977 A-U 

A-11 Maryland Wholesale and Retail Trade Employment, by Month, 
Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 
December 1977 A-12 

A-12 Maryland Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate Employment, 
by Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: 
January 1972 - December 1977 A-13 

A-13 Maryland Federal Government Employment, by Month, 

Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 

December 1977 A-14 



Table No. 



Page 



A-14 Maryland State and Local Government Employment, by Month, 
Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 
December 19 77 A- 15 

A-15 Maryland Total Government Employment, by Month, 

Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - 

December 1977 A-16 

A-16 Maryland Service Employment, by Month, Unadjusted and 

Seasonally Adjusted: January 1972 - December 1977 A-17 

A-17 Maryland Average Weekly Initial Unemployment Claims, by 

Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1964 - 
December 1977 A-18 

A-18 Maryland Accession Rate in Manufacturing, by Month, 
Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1964 - 
December 1977 A-19 

A-19 Maryland Layoff Rate in Manufacturing, by Month, 

Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1964 - 

December 1977 A-20 

A-20 Number of Business Failures in Maryland, by Month, 
Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1965 - 
December 1977 A-21 

A-21 Current Liabilities of Business Failures in Maryland, by 

Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1964 - 
December 1977 A-22 

A-22 Maryland Total Construction Contract Awards Valuation, by 
Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1965 - 
December 1977 A-23 

A-23 Maryland Total Building Construction Contract Awards 

Valuation, by Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: 

January 1966 - December 1977 A-24 

A-24 Maryland Nonresidential Building Construction Contract 
Awards Valuation, by Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally 
Adjusted: January 1966 - December 1977 A-25 

A-25 Maryland Residential Building Construction Contract Awards 
Valuation, by Month, Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: 
January 1966 - December 1977 A-26 

A-26 New Car Registrations in Maryland, by Month, Unadjusted 

and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1966 - December 1977 . . . A-27 



Table No. Page 

A-27 Estimated Retail Sales in Maryland, by Month, Unadjusted 

and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1964 - December 1977 .... A-28 

A-28 Maryland Bank Debits to Demand Deposit Accounts, by Month, 
Unadjusted and Seasonally Adjusted: January 1966 - 
December 1977 A-29 

A-29 Time Deposits in Maryland, by Month, Unadjusted and 

Seasonally Adjusted: January 1964 - December 1977 A-30 

A-30 Demand Deposits in Maryland, by Month, Unadjusted and 

Seasonally Adjusted: January 1964 - December 1977 A-31 

A-31 Prime Contract Awards by the Department of Defense, Net 

Value by Department: Fiscal Year 1977 A-32 

A-32 Prime Contract Awards by the Department of Defense, Net 

Value by Fiscal Years: 1975, 1976 and 1977 A-33 

A-33 Prime Contract Awards by the Department of Defense, Net 
Value of Civil Functions: Fiscal Years 1974, 1975 and 
1976 and Fiscal Years 1976 and 1977 to Date A-34 

Footnotes to Tables A-31 - A-33 A-35 

A-34 State Rankings of Selected Demographic Characteristics .... A-36 

A-35 State Rankings of Federal Outlays Made by Major 

Federal Organizations A-42 

A-36 State Rankings of Federal Outlays by Major 

Functional Classifications A-46 



V. 



-1- 



NO. 1 
GEOGRAPHICAL REGIONS OF MARYLAND GROUPED BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



SUB-REGIONS 



Baltimore Area 

Baltimore City 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Howard 

Harford 

Carroll 

Western Maryland 

Frederick 
Washington 
Allegany 
Garrett 

Washington Suburbs 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 

Southern Maryland 

Charles 
St. Mary's 
Calvert 

Eastern Shore 

Kent 

Queen Anne's 

Talbot 

Caroline 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Somerset 

Worcester 

Northern Maryland 

Cecil 



Note: Planning Regions - Maryland State Planning Department 



No. la 

MARYLAND HIGHLIGHTS 



SIZE IN SQUARE MILES 

Land 

Chesapeake Bay 
Inland Water 
Total 

POPULATION PROJECTION: JULY 1, 1977 



Maryland 
Baltimore SMSA 
Washington, D. C. SMSA 



9,874 

1,726 

703 

12,303 



4,186,500 
2,165,500 
1,337,800 



Per Cent Change 
Over 1970 Census 

6.7 

4.6 

8.7 



EDUCATION; 1976 

Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools 

Total All Levels 1,201,267 

Pre-Kindergarten through High School 989,992 

Four- Year Colleges and Universities 129,362 

Two-Year Colleges 81,933 

Public High School Graduates and 

Per Cent Intending to Continue Education 56,063; 42.8% 

LABOR FORCE, EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT: 1976 



By Place of Residence 

Civilian Labor Force 

Total Employment 

Unemployment and Percentage Rate 

Non-Agricultural Wage and Salary 
Annual Average Employment , 
By Place of Work 



1,900,000 
1,772,000 

128,000; 6.8% 



Total Non-Agricultural Employment 
Manufacturing 

Durable Goods 

Non-Durable Goods 
Non-Manufacturing 

Mining 

Contract Construction 

Transportation and Utilities 

Wholesale Trade 

Retail Trade 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 

Services and Miscellaneous 

Federal Government 

State and Local Government 



(1,000) 


Per Cent of Total 


1,507.1 


100.0 


231.6 


15.4 


126.1 


8.4 


105.5 


7.0 


1,275.5 


84.6 


1.8 


0.1 


93.7 


6.2 


78.1 


5.2 


74.9 


5.0 


287.4 


19.0 


80.1 


5.3 


287.6 


19.1 


133.6 


8.9 


238.3 


15.8 



-3- 



MARYLAND HIGHLIGHTS 



PERSONAL INCOME; 1976 



Gross State Product 

(In billions of current dollars) 
Total Personal Income 

(In millions of dollars) 
Per Capita Personal Income 
Median Household Effective Buying Income 



6,880 
15,494 



LEADING MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
BY VALUE ADDED: 1975 
(In millions of dollars) 



All Industries 
Food and Kindred Products 
Electrical Machinery 
Primary Metal Industries 



5,583.0 
962.3 
657.7 
596.7 



STATE FINANCE: FISCAL YEAR 1976 
(In thousands of dollars) 



Total Receipts 
Total Available Revenues 
Total Expenditures 
Surplus and Fund Balances 



$ 3,531,548 

3,619,142 

3,504,293 

End of Year 114,849 



TOTAL RETAIL SALES ESTIMATED: 1976 
(In thousands of dollars) 



$13,628,353 



CASH RECEIPTS FROM FARMING; 1975 

All Crops 

Livestock and Livestock Products 

Government Payments 

Total Receipts 



($1.000) 
260,853 
405,490 
1,204 
667,547 



VALUE OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT AWARDS; 1976 
(In millions of dollars) $ 



2,027 



PORT OF BALTIMORE TRADE: 1976 



Imports 

Tonnage (2,000 lbs.) 

Value ($1,000) 
Exports 

Tonnage (2,000 lbs.) 

Value ($1,000) 



19,651,223 
$ 3,075,349 

14,944,604 
$ 5,173,876 



ASSESSABLE BASE FOR TAXATION: FISCAL YEAR 19 78 



Total Assessable Tax Base 

Real Property Tax Base 
(In billions of dollars) 



33.8 

25.4 



MARYLAND HICHLIGHTS 



ALL ACTIVE BANKS IN MARYLAND; DECEMBER 31, 1975 
(In millions of dollars) 

Total Assets $ 11,562 

Total Liabilities 10,592 

NUMBER OF MOTOR VEHICLES REGISTERED: 2,342,844 
FEBRUARY 14, 1977 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1977 

VOTOR REGISTRATION: DECEMBER 31, 1976 1,943,391 



POPULATION AND VITAL STATISTICS 

The population of Maryland is estimated to have grown by nearly six per 
cent since 1970, according to data furnished by the Maryland Department of 
Health and Mental Hygiene. 

State estimates for all fifty states for the period ending July 1, 1976 
indicate that the 5.9 per cent increase in Maryland's population from 1970 to 
that date is slightly above the percentage increase of 5.6 per cent nationally. 

As might be expected in an area as diverse as Maryland, there is con- 
siderable variance of growth among the political subdivisions of the State. 
Howard County was the fastest growing subdivision with a 69.6 per cent increase 
in population over the period from April 1, 1970 to July 1, 1976. Next were 
Calvert (35.9 per cent), Charles (31.3 per cent), Carroll (21.1 per cent), and 
Harford (20.7 per cent) Counties. At the opposite extreme was Allegany County 
(-2.1 per cent). Concurrently, Baltimore City showed the largest loss in 
population, with a drop of 8.1 per cent indicated. 

Consistent with national growth patterns, the population shifts have been 
urban in nature. The greatest increases are to be found in metropolitan 
Baltimore, with the exception of Baltimore City, and in extensions of suburban 
metropolitan Washington, Calvert and Charles Counties and Frederick. 
As is readily seen, with the exception of Baltimore City itself, and Prince 
George's County which has experienced a considerable decrease in its growth 
rate, the political subdivisions with below average growth are predominantly 
rural in their characteristics. Approximately 84 per cent of Marylanders 
reside in the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas, with the greater 
growth coming from Howard, Calvert and Charles Counties. 



More detailed demographic aspects are available as of this writing. 
Baltimore City contains by far the greatest concentration of non-white citizens 
in the State. Of the 901,170 non-white Marylanders, 442,570 or 49.1 per cent 
reside in that jurisdiction. The overall percentage of non-white persons in 
the State is 21.9 while in Baltimore City, 52.4 per cent of the population is 
non-white. Of the total population estimate for the State, 37.9 per cent are 
white male, 40.2 per cent white female, while non-white males comprise 10.4 
per cent and non-white females, 11.4 per cent. 

The birth rate of the general population in Maryland followed the declining 
national trend. All political subdivisions shared in this decline. The 
State's birth rate in 1975 was 12.8 per thousand population; with the white 
birth rate standing at 11.7 and the non-white at 16.8. At the same time, the 
death rate here was 7.8 per thousand, with the white death rate at 8.0 and the 
non-white at 7.1. 

There were 44,700 marriages in Maryland during 1975. Roughly 15,400 
divorces and annulments were granted during that year, with 63.6 per cent being 
decreed on the grounds of voluntary separation. 



-7- 



POPULATION; STATE OF MARYLA1^ID AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS, 
RANK BY PER CENT OF CHANGE: 1976 AND 1970 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



PROJECTION FOR 
JULY 1, 1976 



APRIL 1, 1970 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1970/1976 



MARYLAND 



4,153,900* 



3,922,399 



5.9 



Howard 

Calvert 

Charles 

Carroll 

Harford 

Anne Arundel 
Frederick 
Garrett 
Worcester 
Queen Anne's 

Montgomery 
St. Mary's 
Caroline 
Wicomico 
Talbot 

Cecil 

Washington 

Somerset 

Baltimore 

Kent 

Prince George's 
Dorchester 
Allegany 
Baltimore City 



105,000 
28,100 
62,600 
83,600 

139,300 

351,100 
98,800 
24,600 
27,600 
20,800 

580,900 
52,600 
21,900 
60,000 
25,900 

56,400 
109,600 

19,700 
642,400 

16,700 

681,600 
29,900 
82,300 

832,500 



61,911 


69.6 


20,682 


35.9 


47,678 


31.3 


69,006 


21.1 


115,378 


20.7 


297,539 


18.0 


84,927 


16.3 


21,476 


14.5 


24,442 


12.9 


18,422 


12.9 


522,809 


11.1 


47,388 


11.0 


19,781 


10.7 


54,236 


10.6 


23,682 


9.4 


53.291 


5.8 


103,829 


5.6 


18,924 


4.1 


621,077 


3.4 


16,146 


3.4 


660,567 


3.2 


29,405 


1.7 


84,044 


-2.1 


905,759 


-8.1 



Population projection for the State of Maryland differs from the provisional figure 
for July 1, 1976 provided by the U. S. Bureau of the Census as shown in Table No. 3 
due to a difference in methodology. 

Sources: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maryland Center for 
Health Statistics, Maryland Population Estimates, July 1, 1975 and 
Projections to 1981 , issued June 1977. 

U.S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Population 1970 , Number of 
Inhabitants , Maryland, PC (1)-A22. 



POPULATION OF THE 50 STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLWIBIA 
RANK BY PER CENT OF CHANGE: 1976 AND 1970 
(IN THOUSANDS) 



JURISDICTION 



JULY 1, 1976 


APRIL 1, 1970 


PER CENT CHANGE 


(PROVISIONAL) 


(CENSUS) 


1970/1976 


214,659 


203,235 


5.6 


2,270 


1,772 


28.1 


382 


302 


26.5 


610 


489 


24.7 


8,421 


6,789 


24.0 


390 


332 


17.5 


2,583 


2,207 


17.0 


831 


713 


16.5 


1,228 


1,059 


16.0 


887 


770 


15.2 


1,168 


1,016 


15.0 


12,487 


11,197 


11.5 


822 


738 


11.4 


2,329 


2,091 


11.4 


2,848 


2,591 


9.9 


2,109 


1,923 


9.7 


753 


694 


8.5 


4,970 


4,590 


8.3 


5,032 


4,648 


8.3 


2,766 


2,559 


8.1 


21,520 


19,953 


7.9 


5,469 


5,082 


7.6 


1,070 


994 


7.6 


4,214 


3,924 


7.4 


476 


445 


7.0 


3,428 


3,219 


6.5 


3,665 


3,444 


6.4 


2,354 


2,217 


6.2 


582 


548 


6.2 


3,612 


3,409 


6.0 


4,144 


3,922 


5.7 


3,841 


3,643 


5.4 


1,553 


1,484 


4.6 


1,821 


1,744 


4.4 


4,609 


4,418 


4.3 


3,965 


3,805 


4.2 



United States 

Arizona 

Alaska 

Nevada 

Florida 

Wyoming 

Colorado 
Idaho 
Utah 
Hawaii 
New Mexico 

Texas 

New Hampshire 

Oregon 

South Carolina 

Arkansas 

Montana 

Georgia 

Virginia 

Oklahoma 

California 

North Carolina 

Maine 

Tennessee 

Vermont 

Kentucky 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Delaware 

Washington 

MARYLAND 

Louisiana 
Nebraska 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Minnesota 



(continued on following page) 



NO. 3 

POPULATION OF THE 50 STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLWIBIA 
RANK BY PER CENT OF CHANGE: 1976 AND 1970 (Cont'd.) 
(IN THOUSANDS) 







JULY 1, 1976 


APRIL 1, 1970 




PEE 


CENT CHANGE 


JURISDICTION 




(PROVISIONAL) 


(CENSUS) 






1970/1976 


North Dakota 




643 


618 






4.0 


South Dakota 




686 


666 






3.0 


Connecticut 




3,117 


3,032 






2.8 


Kansas 




2,310 


2,249 






2.7 


Michigan 




9,104 


8,875 






2.6 


New Jersey 




7,336 


7,168 






2.3 


Missouri 




4,778 


4,677 






2.2 


Indiana 




5,302 


5,194 






2.1 


Massachusetts 




5,809 


5,689 






2.1 


Iowa 




2,870 


2,825 






1.6 


Illinois 




11,229 


11,114 






1.0 


Pennsylvania 




11,862 


11,794 






0.6 


Ohio 




10,690 


10,652 






0.4 


New York 




18,084 


18,241 






-0.9 


Rliode Island 




927 


950 






-2.4 


District of Columbia 


702 


757 






-7.3 


Source: U. S. 


Bureau 


of the Csnsus, Census of 


Population 1970, Number 


of 




Inhabitants 


United States PC (l)-Al. 


Current Population 


Reports, 





NO. 4 
POPULATION DENSITY IN THE UNITED STATES, BY STATE: 1975 



PERSONS PER 
SQUARE MILE 



PERSONS PER 
SQUARE MILE 



New England 




Maine 


34 


New Hampshire 


91 


Vermont 


51 


Massachusetts 


745 


Rhode Island 


884 


Connecticut 


637 


Middle Atlantic 




New York 


379 


New Jersey 


973 


Pennsylvania 


263 


East North Central 




Ohio 


263 


Indiana 


147 


Illinois 


200 


Michigan 


161 


Wisconsin 


85 


West North Central 




Minnesota 


50 


Iowa 


51 


Missouri 


69 


North Dakota 


9 


South Dakota 


9 


Nebraska 


20 


Kansas 


28 


South Atlantic 




Delaware 


292 


MARYLAND 


414 


District of Columbia 


11,738 


Virginia 


125 


West Virginia 


75 


North Carolina 


112 


South Carolina 


93 


Georgia 


85 


Florida 


155 



East South Central 
Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama 
Mississippi 

West South Central 
Arkansas 
Louisiana 
Oklahoma 
Texas 



Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 



Washington 

Oregon 

California 

Alaska 

Hawaii 



86 

101 

71 

50 



39 
47 



5 

10 
4 

24 
9 

20 

15 
5 



53 
24 

136 
1 

135 



Source: Statistical Abstract of the U. S. 1976. 



NO. 5 

POPULATION DENSITY OF MARYLAND SUBDIVISIONS: RANKED BY DENSITY: JULY, 1976 



SUBDIVISION 



LAND 




AREA IN 


POPULATION PRO J. 


SQ. MI. 


FOR JULY 1, 1976 


9,874 


4,153,900 


79 


832,500 


485 


681,600 


493 


580,900 


608 


642,400 


417 


351,100 


250 


105,000 


448 


139,300 


462 


109,600 


426 


82,300 


453 


83,600 


352 


56,400 


380 


60,000 


664 


98,800 


367 


52,600 


458 


62,600 


219 


28,100 


279 


25,900 


320 


21,900 


332 


19,700 


284 


16,700 


483 


27,600 


373 


20,800 


580 


29,900 


662 


24,600 



POPULATION DENSITY 
PEOPLE/ SQ. MI. 



MARYLAND 

Baltimore City 
Prince George's 
Montgomery 
Baltimore 
Anne Arundel 

Howard 

Harford 

Washington 

Allegany 

Carroll 

Cecil 
Wicomico 
Frederick 
St. Mary's 
Charles 

Calvert 

Talbot 

Caroline 

Somerset 

Kent 

Worcester 
Queen Anne's 
Dorchester 
Garrett 



420.7 

10,538.0 

1,405.4 

1,178.3 

1,056.6 

842.0 

420.0 
310.9 
237.2 
193.2 
184.5 

160.2 
157.9 
148.8 
143.3 
136.7 

128.3 
92.8 
68.4 
59.3 
58.8 

57.1 
55.8 
51.6 
37.2 



Land Area compiled by the Geography Division, Bureau of the Census, U. S. 
Department of Commerce, as reported in Maryland Manual , 1973-1974. 

Population projected by Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 
Maryland Center for Health Statistics, report issued June 1977. 



NO. 6 
MARYLAND POPULATION GROWTH: 1880-1976 





INCREASE OVER 


PRECEDING 


CENSUS 


PER CENT INCREASE OF 
U.S. POPULATION OVER 


YEAR 


POPULATION 


NUMBER 


PER CENT 


PRECEDING PERIOD— 

OF THE CONTERMINOUS 

UNITED STATES ^1) 


1976(Prov.) 


4,1A4,000 


22,000 


0.5 


0.8 


1975(Est.) 


4,122,000 


33,000 


0.8 


0.8 


1974(Est.) 


4,089,000 


15,000 


0.4 


0.7 


1973(Est.) 


4,074,000 


19,000 


0.5 


0.8 


1972 (Est.) 


4,055,000 


49,000 


1.2 


1.0 


1971(Est.) 


4,006,000 


83,601 


2.1 


1.4 


1970 


3,922,399 


821,710 


26.5 


13.3 


1960 


3,100,689 


757,688 


32.3 


18.4 


1950 


2,343,001 


521,757 


28.6 


14.5 


1940 


1,821,244 


189,718 


11.6 


7.2 


1930 


1,631,526 


181,875 


12.5 


16.1 


1920 


1,449,661 


154,315 


11.9 


14.9 


1910 


1,295,346 


107,302 


9.0 


21.0 


1900 


1,188,044 


145,654 


14.0 


20.7 


1890 


1,042,390 


107,447 


11.5 


25.5 


1880 


934,943 


154,049 


19.7 


26.0 



^^All years exclude Hawaii and Alaska. 

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census. Estimates for 1971-1975 and provisional for 
1976 from Population Estimates and Projections , Series P-25, Nos. 640, 
642, November 1976. 



COMPONENTS OF POPULATION CHANGE DUE TO MIGRATION AND NATURAL INCREASE 
BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1970-1974 



SUBDIVISION 



TOTAL CHANGE 



NATURAL CHANGE 



MIGRATION CHANGE 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Baltimore City 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne ' s 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



-0.6 

13.1 

2.0 

-4.6 

20.3 

5.1 

15.2 

5.7 

24.2 

-0.7 

11.0 

7.9 

16.3 

49.1 

3.8 

7.2 

2.6 

6.6 

8.0 

2.0 

6.3 

2.5 

6.7 

6.8 



0.7 
4.1 
2.2 
1.3 
4.2 
0.5 
2.7 
4.3 
5.8 
-0.1 
2.9 
3.0 
5.0 
4.6 
0.6 
3.2 
5.4 
0.4 
6.8 
-0.2 
-0.3 
2.2 
1.6 
0.7 



-1.3 

9.0 

-0.2 

-5.9 

16.1 

4.6 

12.5 

1.4 

18.4 

-0.6 

8.1 

4.9 

11.3 

44.5 

3.2 

4.0 

-2.8 

6.2 

1.2 

2.2 

6.6 

0.3 

5.1 

6.1 



STATE TOTAL 



4.4 



3.0 



1.4 



U. S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports, 
and Projections , Series P-25, No. 620, February 1976. 



Population Estimates 



-14- 



NO. 8 



MIGRATION TO AND FROM MARYLAND: 
BY STATE 



FROM MARYLAND 



TO MARYLAND 



New England 
Maine 

New Hampshire 
Vermont 
Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 



1,540 
1,386 
792 
8,387 
2,334 
6,084 



2,073 
1,170 
689 
11,785 
2,548 
6,242 



" Middle Atlantic 
New York 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 



18,258 
15,244 
31,686 



35,822 
20,051 
42,881 



East North Central 
Ohio 
Indiana 
Illinois 
Michigan 
Wisconsin 



11,397 
4,025 
8,677 
6,226 
2,303 



17,235 
5,299 

10,828 
7,599 
3,246 



West North Central 
Minnesota 
Iowa 

Missouri 
North Dakota 
South Dakota 
Nebraska 
Kansas 



2,129 

1,122 

3,347 

367 

244 

884 

2,222 



212 
889 
121 
767 
803 
065 
149 



South Atlantic 
Delaware 

MARYLAND (internal flow) 
District of Columbia 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Florida 



9,191 

116,600 

12,022 

43,293 

9,891 
13,020 

5,678 

7,181 
27,852 



6,492 

71,371 
50,002 
12,605 
14,070 
5,633 
7,303 
16,748 



(continued on following page) 



MIGRATION TO AND FROM MARYLAND: 
BY STATE (Cont'd.) 



FROM I-IARYLAND TO MARYLAND 



East South Central 

Kentucky 3,625 3,245 

Tennessee 4,852 5,427 

Alabama 2,910 4,348 

Mississippi 1,122 1,760 

West South Central 

Arkansas 1,110 1,123 

Louisiana 2,401 3,338 

Oklahoma 1,947 3,189 

Texas 11,241 12,290 



Montana 419 552 

Idaho 369 555 

Wyoming 240 423 

Colorado 4,719 3,798 

New Mexico 1,222 2,400 

Arizona 2,894 1,848 

Utah 841 1,194 

Nevada 819 710 



3, 


,625 


4, 


,852 


2. 


,910 


1, 


,122 


1. 


,110 


2. 


,401 


1. 


,947 


11. 


,241 




419 




369 




240 


4, 


,719 


1 


,222 


2 


,894 




841 




819 


3 


,596 


1 


,294 


25 


,551 


1 


,364 


3 


,161 



Washington 3,596 3,253 

Oregon 1,294 1,487 

California 25,551 24^487 

Alaska 1,364 1,320 

Hawaii 3,161 3,596 

MARYLAND TOTAL 332,479 448,041 
Source: Final Report PC (2) 2E, 1970, U. S. Bureau of the Census, Table 4. 



''U^l 



-r- 0=" tri ; 



] td o o m 



<; o o in 
H 3 r- r- 



^^ 






•^ CO 0> ON 



< Z <r -H rH 



o in ON m f*^ 



ON ON I iH 



m rH m r^ c 
<r CO vo 00 c 



<• o 00 m r 

ON d O ON f 



iH CO 00 CM SO 

vO rH ON CM CM 

CM in C3N ^ vD 

CJ^ CJN iH <■ 



iH ON r^ 00 vO 
<3N [^ CT^ ro iH 
CJN 00 O l~^ iH 



m Ah r-i o 00 
00 o in \£) o 



00 C7N <d- 00 r 



■• in m o 

^ en ,H 00 



r^ ON r~ ON 00 
00 <r 00 ON 00 


O r^ <!■ O ON 

CJN Ol ON <1- 00 

r-~ M nH cjN oj 


00 

00 


vD (N CO r-. 
o 00 r^ vD 
<f cN in -H 


CO r-- (N m cni 
CJ\ <r ON r^ 00 


CM m m 

CJN (N vO 


CM 


Ol <N <JN 00 CN 

00 ^D r^ CJN rH 


m vD o fn o 

.H so m CO CM 


00 


r-l in VO CM 

CM o in -H 


CO rH CO 00 rH 
CJN vO ^ CO rH 


r- o CM 

iH O -* 


so 



<r ON 

<- CO 

o m 


C3N r- 
in r^ 
r-- o 


00 


00 


o 
o 


ON 


00 


o 


CM 
ON 




00 


CT^ 




O 
00 


vO 


CM 00 
CvJ 00 
•^ CO 


CJ\ 


00 


ON 

00 


vD 


vr 


00 ON 


in rH 
O CM 
ON VD 


O 


CTN 


ON 


CO 

in 




<3N 


00 


s 


m 


vO 


VO 


s 


O 


00 r-- 

rH «J- 


00 


CM 


O 


^ 


CM 


o o 
<r in 
<r o 


C O 

r^ 00 
m ON 


O 


§ 


o 

CJN 
00 


o 

ON 


o 

vO 


o 


o 


o 


o 
m 


O 


O 
O 


o 


g 


8S 

CM vO 


o 


o 


^ 
r^ 


O 

CJN 


O 

o 


rH rH 


CM 1^ 


00 


<r 


(N 


Csl 


<r 


ON 


vD 




rH 


(N 


>a- 


\£> 


CM 


«3- ON 


r-- 


in 


>J- 


Csl 


00 



o o o o o 
o CO in r^ o 
CM so in vO r- 



o o o o o 



o o o o o 

rH 00 O O r^ 
On O rH 1^ in 



o o o o o 



o o o o 



00 O O O rH 



o o o o o 
<• 00 CM m <r 

SD \0 rH vO C3N 



o o o o o 



sD rH so O vO 



ON sr so 00 



o o o o 
00 m C7N m 
m 00 o o 



m 00 ON r-* 
CM o m CM 



CO < B e fi -H rH 



U CJ U O Q 







^ S C-" 


(2 


^ 




O 1-1 


•H 4J T3 




i"^^^ 


4-> O <U 
00 O 4J 


V^ 4J M -O 




as c^ 2 


4-) C tH CO 


<U Q) O l-i 




O -rt B OJ 


T) ^ MH to 




■w c <u g 


Xi JZ O O 


<U U U ^ 


c 




rH to CJ 1-1 


Vj to CO O 


0) 




to CO ^ O 


Pm O PC !I3 


1^ 


S Ph C W W 


H s :2 S 






^ ^1 






NO. 11 



COMPARATIVE POPULATION ESTIMATES AND VITAL STATISTICS DATA, 
FOR MARYLAND REGIONS: 1975 



RACE AND REGION 



Total 



Northwest Area 
i Baltimore Metro Area 
' National Capital Area 
: Southern Area 
; Eastern Shore Area 

■ White 

I Northwest Area 

: Baltimore Metro Area 

National Capital Area 
: Southern Area 
' Eastern Shore Area 

Nonwhite 

' Northwest Area 

; Baltimore Metro Area 
National Capital Area 
Southern Area 
Eastern Shore Area 





1975 


BIRTHS 


DEATHS 


4 


,121,610 


52,732 


32,071 




312,300 


3,793 


2,885 


2 


,142,360 


27,194 


18,723 


1 


,252,150 


15,987 


6,789 




139,140 


2,212 


902 




275,660 


3,546 


2,772 


3 


,220,440 


37,629 


25,688 




299,310 


3,611 


2,788 


1 


,593,980 


18,129 


14,090 


1 


,003,720 


11,637 


5,947 




106,570 


1,639 


690 




216,860 


2,613 


2,173 




901,170 


15,103 


6,383 




12,990 


182 


97 




548,380 


9,065 


4,633 




248,430 


4,350 


842 




32,570 


573 


212 




58,800 


933 


599 



INFANT 
DEATHS 



INFANT 
BIRTH DEATH MORTALITY 
RATE^l) KA.Te(I) RATe(I) 



12.8 



53 


12.1 


9.2 


497 


12.7 


8.7 


273 


12.8 


5.4 


37 


15.9 


6.5 


67 


12.9 


10.1 



587 



53 


12.1 


9.3 


277 


11.4 


8.8 


183 


11.6 


5.9 


27 


15.4 


6.5 


47 


12.0 


10.0 



- 


14.0 


7.5 


20 


16.5 


8.4 


90 


17.5 


3.4 


10 


17.6 


6.5 


20 


15.9 


10.2 



17.6 

14.0 
18.3 
17.1 
16.7 
18.9 

15.6 

14.7 
15.3 
15.7 
16.5 
18.0 

22.5 



24.3 
20.7 
17.5 
21.4 



Per 1,000 population. 
Per 1,000 live births. 



Note: The geographic regions of the State and the political subdivisions they include 
are: 



Northwest 


Southern 


Baltimore Metro 


National Capital 


Eastern Shore 


Area 


Area 


Area 


Area 


Area 


Garrett 


Calvert 


Baltimore City 


Montgomery 


Cecil 


Allegany 


Charles 


Baltimore 


Prince George's 


Kent 


Washington 


St. Mary's 


Anne Arundel 




Queen Anne's 


Frederick 




Carroll 

Howard 

Harford 




Caroline 

Talbot 

Dorchester 



Wicomico 
Somerset 
Worcester 
Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maryland Center for Health 
Statistics, Annual Vital Statistics Report , 1975. 

-19- 



ESTIMATED WHITE POPULATION, BY AGE GROUP AND 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: JULY 1, 1975 









WHITE POPULATION BY AGE 




REGION AND 














POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 


ALL AGES 


HINDER 1 


1-4 


5-17 


18-44 


45-64 


65+ 


I-IARYLAND 


3,220,440 


37,410 


170,290 


747,810 


1,273,220 


700,040 


291,670 


Allegany 


81,200 


880 


4,300 


17,890 


27,460 


19,700 


10,970 


Anne Arundel 


301,630 


3,810 


17,790 


76,400 


126,520 


58,870 


18,240 


Baltimore City 


402,550 


3,970 


17,070 


69,510 


142,080 


98,620 


71,300 


Baltimore 


601,670 


6,420 


28,360 


139,040 


228,170 


148,500 


51,180 


Calvert 


18,700 


260 


1,150 


4,240 


7,210 


4,030 


1,810 


Caroline 


17,460 


220 


940 


4,070 


5,930 


3,880 


2,420 


Carroll 


78,330 


970 


4,480 


19,110 


30,580 


15,360 


7,830 


Cecil 


52,990 


780 


3,640 


13,860 


20,220 


10,320 


4,170 


Charles 


45,730 


620 


3,320 


13,310 


19,480 


6,820 


2,180 


Dorchester 


20,420 


190 


870 


4,130 


6,700 


5,110 


3,420 


Frederick 


89,910 


1,140 


5,460 


22,140 


36,050 


17,420 


7,700 


Garrett 


24,080 


340 


1,530 


5,980 


8,500 


5,040 


2,690 


Harford 


124,100 


1,690 


7,970 


32,480 


51,760 


23,310 


6,890 


Howard 


85,700 


1,070 


4,890 


21,400 


39,630 


14,830 


3,880 


Kent 


12,570 


140 


660 


2,720 


4,560 


2,580 


1,910 


Montgomery 


516,010 


5,410 


25,130 


127,160 


203,540 


117,810 


36,960 


Prince George's 


487,710 


6,260 


28,100 


115,240 


217,280 


91,400 


29,430 


Queen Anne ' s 


16,220 


160 


800 


3,720 


5,720 


3,880 


1,940 


St. Mary's 


42,140 


790 


3,260 


10,720 


18,350 


6,660 


2,360 


Somerset 


12,210 


130 


580 


2,440 


3,940 


3,070 


2,050 


Talbot 


19,860 


180 


840 


4,070 


6,420 


5,040 


3,310 


Washington 


104,120 


1,240 


5,870 


24,470 


38,450 


22,990 


11,100 


Wicomico 


46,170 


540 


2,360 


9,940 


17,690 


10,340 


5,300 


Worcester 


18,960 


200 


920 


3,770 


6,980 


4,460 


2,630 


Source: Maryland Dep 


artment of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maryland Center 


for Health 


Statistics, 


Annual Vital Statistics 


Report, 1975. 









NO. 13 



ESTIMATED MARYLAND NONWHITE POPULATION, BY AGE GROUP AND 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: JULY 1, 1975 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 


ALL AGES 




NONWHITE POPULATION BY AGE 






UNDER 1 


1-4 


5-17 


18-44 


45-64 


65+ 


MARYLAND 




901,170 


14,460 


68,730 


254,150 


379,760 


135,260 


48,810 


Allegany 




1,440 


30 


140 


330 


560 


210 


170 


Anne Arundel 




41,050 


650 


2,900 


11,870 


16,740 


6,080 


2,810 


Baltimore City 




442,570 


7,020 


31,430 


124,120 


174,760 


77,390 


27,850 


Baltimore 




37,980 


690 


3,020 


9,570 


16,390 


5,940 


2,370 


Calvert 




8,240 


150 


660 


2,830 


2,960 


1,140 


500 


Caroline 




4,120 


60 


250 


1,070 


1,430 


900 


410 


Carroll 




2,890 


30 


190 


760 


1,120 


480 


310 


Cecil 




2,950 


60 


210 


730 


1,180 


510 


260 


Charles 




14,660 


230 


1,150 


5,410 


5,160 


1,980 


730 


Dorchester 




9,420 


140 


720 


2,590 


3,120 


1,890 


960 


Frederick 




6,750 


100 


510 


2,220 


2,380 


1,030 


510 


Garrett 




70 


- 


- 


50 


20 


- 


- 


Harford 




11,550 


210 


910 


3,290 


4,700 


1,770 


670 


Howard 




12,340 


160 


1,000 


3,660 


5,570 


1,560 


390 


Kent 




4,040 


50 


210 


1,120 


1,450 


730 


480 


Montgomery 




56,060 


960 


5,040 


15,080 


26,160 


7,150 


1,670 


Prince George's 




192,370 


3,110 


16,770 


54,730 


96,310 


17,550 


3,900 


Queen Anne ' s 




4,200 


50 


210 


1,070 


1,450 


860 


560 


St. Mary's 




9,670 


180 


810 


3,390 


3,450 


1,260 


580 


Somerset 




7,340 


110 


490 


2,000 


2,710 


1,250 


780 


Talbot 




5,720 


70 


330 


1,440 


1,940 


1,190 


750 


Washington 




4,730 


50 


220 


880 


2,810 


500 


270 


Wicomico 




12,920 


230 


1,020 


3,560 


4,560 


2,400 


1,150 


Worcester 




8,090 


120 


540 


2,380 


2,830 


1,490 


730 


Source: Maryland 


Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Center 


for Health 






Statistics, 


Annual Vital 


Statistics 


Report, 


1975. 









-21- 



MARRIAGE BY RESIDENT STATUS AND TYPE OF CEREMONY, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION OF OCCURRENCE: 1975 







MARRIAGE 


BY 


residence(i) 


TYPE 


OF CEREMONY 




POLITICAL SUB- 
DIVISION OF 




















TOTAL 


MARYLAND 
RESIDENTS (2) 


NOl 
NU] 


SI-RES 


IDENTS(3) 
PER CENT 


RELIGIOUS 




CIVIL 




OCCURRENCE 


^ER 


NUMBER 


PER CENT 


MARYLAND 


44,706 


33,761 


10 


,945 


24.5 


29,775 


14 


931 


33.4 


Allegany 


1,351 


783 




568 


42.0 


871 




480 


35.5 


Anne Arundel 


2,906 


2,656 




250 


8.6 


2,280 




626 


21.5 


Baltimore City 


7,599 


7,197 




402 


5.3 


5,404 


2 


,195 


28.9 


Baltimore 


5,471 


5,173 




298 


5.4 


4,363 


1 


,108 


20.3 


Calvert 


217 


203 




14 


6.5 


179 




38 


17.5 


Caroline 


426 


232 




194 


45.5 


366 




60 


14.1 


Carroll 


774 


652 




122 


15.8 


553 




221 


28.6 


Cecil 


5,025 


755 


4 


,270 


85.0 


1,652 


3 


,373 


67.1 


Charles 


576 


445 




131 


22.7 


323 




253 


43.9 


Dorchester 


271 


255 




16 


5.9 


250 




21 


7.7 


Frederick 


988 


820 




168 


17.0 


747 




241 


24.4 


Garrett 


954 


265 




689 


72.2 


565 




389 


40.8 


Harford 


1,368 


1,075 




293 


21.4 


865 




503 


36.8 


Howard 


946 


900 




46 


4.9 


611 




335 


35.4 


Kent 


187 


143 




44 


23.5 


144 




43 


23.0 


Montgomery 


5,433 


4,169 


1 


,264 


23.3 


3,786 


1 


,647 


30.3 


Prince George's 


5,887 


5,113 




774 


13.1 


3,741 


2 


,146 


36.5 


Queen Anne's 


157 


145 




12 


7.6 


130 




27 


17.2 


St. Mary's 


443 


413 




30 


6.8 


282 




161 


36.3 


Somerset 


210 


194 




16 


7.6 


185 




25 


11.9 


Talbot 


268 


241 




27 


10.1 


234 




34 


12.7 


Washington 


1,982 


1,034 




948 


47.8 


1,214 




768 


38.7 


Wicomico 


784 


621 




163 


20.8 


659 




125 


15.9 


Worcester 


483 


277 




206 


42.7 


371 




112 


23.2 



(l/Marriages refer to the number of ceremonies performed, not the number of persons 
married . 

(2) 

One or both partners residents of Maryland. 

(3)Both partners non-residents of Maryland. 

Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maryland Center for 
Health Statistics, Annual Vital Statistics Report , 1975. 



NO. 15 



BIRTHS AND BIRTH RATES BY RACE FOR MARYLAND AND POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISIONS: 1975 







NUMBER OF 


BIRTHS 




BIRTH RATES 


(1) 


POLITICAL 


























SUBDIVISION 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


MARYLAND 


52,732 


37,629 


15,103 


12.8 


11.7 


16.8 


Allegany 


902 


878 


24 


10.9 


10.8 


20.8 


Anne Arundel 


4,628 


3,936 


692 


13.5 


13.0 


16.9 


Baltimore City 


11,280 


4,031 


7,249 


13.3 


10.0 


16.4 


Baltimore 


7,053 


6,327 


726 


11.0 


10.5 


19.1 


Calvert 


384 


243 


141 


14.3 


13.0 


17.1 


Caroline 


286 


225 


61 


13.3 


12.9 


14.8 


Carroll 


1,073 


1,045 


28 


13.2 


13.3 


9.7 


Cecil 


872 


807 


65 


15.6 


15.2 


22.0 


Charles 


863 


631 


232 


14.3 


13.8 


15.8 


Dorchester 


329 


199 


130 


11.0 


9.7 


13.8 


Frederick 


1,279 


1,177 


102 


13.2 


13.1 


15.1 


Garrett 


344 


341 


3 


14.2 


14.2 


- 


Harford 


1,875 


1,672 


203 


13.8 


13.5 


17.6 


Howard 


1,285 


1,118 


167 


13.1 


13.0 


13.5 


Kent 


191 


141 


50 


11.5 


11.2 


11.9 


Montgomery 


6,478 


5,468 


1,010 


11.3 


10.6 


18.0 


Prince George's 


9,509 


6,169 


3,340 


14.0 


12.6 


17.4 


Queen Anne's 


241 


175 


66 


11.8 


10.8 


15.7 


St. Mary's 


965 


765 


200 


18.6 


18.2 


20.7 


Somerset 


272 


137 


135 


13.9 


11.2 


18.4 


Talbot 


254 


182 


72 


9.9 


9.2 


12.6 


Washington 


1,268 


1,215 


53 


11.6 


11.7 


11.2 


Wicomico 


794 


554 


240 


13.4 


12.0 


18.6 


Worcester 


307 


193 


114 


11.3 


10.2 


14.1 



(1) 



Per 1,000 population. 



Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maryland Center for Health 
Statistics, Annual Vital Statistics Report , 1975. 



-23- 



t3 U 



rH iH ON CO I 



■ rH iH OO ~a- M iH r 



~ vO vO CN vO 



^D LO OsJ ^ <t 

vO ro r~ CO 00 
CM CO O <f 



^^ rH -d- eg I 



o o m o o 

vO iH o r^ CM 



iH iH CTi CN O 



UO -* .H CO 



HCO.H ooco<y.oo<j- 



1-J o 




TS 








>-i 












>» o 


<u cn 




<: M 




(- 0) OJ 








(U 


M 










gcS 


C - 




O CO 


g 


>, 5 M ^j 




Q) 






o 










^ c: 




M M 


s^ g i 




c 




CD CO 






TJ 






B 


<u 


H > 


< 








0) OJ 


J-l 










o <u 


iS 






hJ 


ao 5 -H 


(U 




O rH 


■H 42 


01 


Q) 


O 






00 o 


c s 




hJ Q 


>-i 


(U 0) 4-1 U 


> 


o 


iJ -H 


1-1 O 


-o 








4J 


AJ C 


<u 


^ 


gg 


s 


rH C iH tH 








rt U 








& 


c 


C 'H 


2 • 


B 


^ 


:^^^5 


CO 


ca 


n) (U 


Xi o 


u 


CO 


CO 


O 


(U 


^^ 


3 j-i 


o 


CO 


O 


o 


o u 


u o 


f^ 


O 


P3 


PS 


;^ 


O- CO 


CO 



NO. 17 



SELECTED MORTALITY DATA BY RACE, MARYLAND AND THE UNITED STATES: 
1972-1975 









DEATH 


RATES (1) 








TOTAL 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


YEAR 


MARYLAND 


UNITED STATES 


MARYLAND 


UNITED STATES 


MARYLAND 


UNITED STATES 


1975 
1974 
1973 
1972 


7.8 
8.1 
8.1 
8.2 


8.9 
9.2 
9.4 
9.4 


8.0 
8.2 
8.2 
8.2 


9.0 
9.2 
9.4 
9.5 


7.1 
7.5 
7.8 
8.3 


8.3 
8.7 
9.1 
9.2 



INFANT DEATH RATES PER 1,000 LIVE BIRTHS 



(2) 



1975 


17.6 


16.1 


15.6 


14.1 


22.5 


24.2 


1974 


15.9 


16.7 


14.1 


14.8 


20.7 


24.9 


1973 


15.8 


17.7 


13.9 


15.8 


21.2 


26.2 


1972 


16.4 


18.5 


14.2 


16.4 


23.0 


27.7 



NEONATAL DEATH RATES PER 1,000 LIVE BIRTHS (^^ 



1975 


13.3 


11.6 


12.0 


10.4 


16.6 


16.8 


1974 


11.9 


12.3 


10.6 


11.1 


15.5 


17.2 


1973 


11.3 


13.0 


9.9 


11.8 


15.0 


17.9 


1972 


12.0 


13.6 


10.6 


12.4 


16.1 


19.2 



'■'■^Death Rates are per 1,000 population. 
^'^•'Death occurring to a person under one year. 
Death occurring to a person under 28 days. 



(3) 



Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maryland Center for Health 
Statistics, Annual Vital Statistics Report , 1975. 



> 


M 


p^ 


S 


w 


?^ 


H 




00 








PC 




H 


hJ 


M 




S 


^ 


pa 


z 




o 






u 


H 


Q < 



r>~ O CN 00 CM iH 
in -d- CM vD rO v£) 
00 u-i CM 



iH vo <■ rH m a> 



00 cyi 00 i~^ « 



vO O iH 00 00 U1 

m CM en CM ,H en 



- o o m en 



m o m en -* CM 
u-i en rH iH o en 
<■ CJ^ ^ en r^ r-~ 



en o 
I ^ (U 

O iH CO 



^-' w cn <f 



W CO (U 



J O Q) p. 
3 O rH 
H 00 a TS 



4J CO CD > CO 

I C > W N 

I CO O C ^ C 

I C >-i (U O Q) 



iH CM CO -* 



O f^ W 
CM >w o 



Q> O vO 

cn in CTN 
CO 00 w ^ 



-26- 



rH r>;rs| 


^ aj Q 


Q ^ 




ri OQ Q 


CN -d- l< 


»a- vo en 


rH C3^ 




CT\ CN rH 


CO <-{ <t 


rH rH 


















en rH O 


CM 00 en 


r-. m 




in en o 


00 vo in 


d CM CM 


vo cm' 




vO CM CN 


-3- 00 in 


vo CM CM 






CM rH VO 


CM rH 










<r 00 en 


O rH vo 


en r-~ 




<N CM 00 


-* d C3N 


cn CJ^ r^ 


ocj <T<. 




ocj r-^ rH 


00 vO vo 










o.^ 










CT\ O vO 


cn rH rH 


CM r-. 




•<)■ rH <3N 


rH 1^ r-H 


c^ r>.' 0C3 


-sT d 




en oi r^ 


r-~ 00 in 


<r CM rH 








en rH 










00 r-~ •«3- 


en vo vo 


CJN vo 




vo CM (jv 


rH O >^ 


cn 00 vo 


ocj C3^ 




d vo en 


vo in vo 








rH 












c^j 00 <a- 


r^ CM o 


r-» rH 




CM VO VO 


m vo CM 


rH vo O^ 


>* rH 




VO r^ ON 


<f 00 m 


m CM rH 


rH CM 






en r-\ 










rH rH vo 


C3> rH 00 


C3> CM 




en r^ m 


eg 00 oo' 


rH r-I r-^ 


vo in 




en rH rH 


O vo m 




rH rH 






en r-i 




































>. 




■<!■ 


^^ 




o 

c 




o 


vo 




CO 






00 








<r 






c 






en 00 




>> 




o 


CN Sj- 










00 




u 






W " 




CO 




00 


1 «d- 




(U 






O r-- 








o <3- 


rH Nd- 




c 




-^ ^-^ 1 


00 i 








CJ^ O 


w o 








^O en 


w r^ 




>. 




00 eg -* 


«* 










CD w 








en o 


U 








1 «3- (U 


ti cd 




CO 




o rH cn 


0) -H 


O r- 






(T, •>-' CO 






M 




en <u 


0^ -H O 




i 




w M CO 


s^ y i 




/-sOO 


6 iH 






a\ r-. 


4J W -O 


W CO <U 


CO <u 




m a\ 


^1 CO 


1 c 


3 > 


o 


ON W 


CO rH >^ 


O (U Ci- 


•U -H 




W 1 


0) P- CO 


O rH 






1 o 


JS O rH 


00 CJ -o 




0) 


O vD 


Q) 3 


W -H C 


rH 14-1 


CO 


m ON 


"JH C O 


^ J= CO 


0) o 


3 


/^ON w 


O CD 


Q) 


B 


CO 


00 w ^-^ 


JJ CO 


CO > CO 


CD 


o 




CO C > 


4J N 


CO -H 




r^ 0) 


<U CO O 


CMC 


Q) CO 


c 


1 <u -o 


CO C >-i 


0) O 0) 


W O 




O "O -H 


'O W 3 


0) x: 


CO 


vO -H O 


Q) -H QJ 


^ O rH 
O S MH 


^ M 




r- (J -H 


CD rH ^^ 


CO u 


(-1 


WH B 


•H eg (U 
P S o 


CJ c 




(U 


3 O 


< M 


O CJ) 


u 


W P3 


r4 Cs'fO 


>* in 


vo r» 


oo' 


O^d 



DEATHS AND DEATH RATES BY RACE FOR MARYLAND AND POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISIONS: 1975 







NUMBER OF DEATHS 






DEATH RATES 


(1) 


POLITICAL 


















SUBDIVISION 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NONWHITE 


MARYLAND 


32 


,071 


25 


,688 


6,383 


7.8 


8.0 


7.1 


Allegany 




902 




887 


15 


10.9 


10.9 


10.4 


Anne Arundel 


1 


,954 


1 


,708 


246 


5.7 


5.7 


6.0 


Baltimore City 


9 


,870 


5 


,879 


3,991 


11.7 


14.6 


9.0 


Baltimore 


5 


,126 


4 


,889 


237 


8.0 


8.1 


6.2 


Calvert 




228 




183 


45 


8.5 


9.8 


5.5 


Caroline 




233 




182 


51 


10.8 


10.4 


12.4 


Carroll 




603 




571 


32 


7.4 


7.3 


11.1 


Cecil 




418 




394 


24 


7.5 


7.4 


8.1 


Charles 




397 




286 


111 


6.6 


6.3 


7.6 


Dorchester 




375 




270 


105 


12.6 


13.2 


11.1 


Frederick 




765 




704 


61 


7.9 


7.8 


9.0 


Garrett 




232 




232 


- 


9.6 


9.6 


- 


Harford 




747 




670 


77 


5.5 


5.4 


6.7 


Howard 




423 




373 


50 


4.3 


4.4 


4.1 


Kent 




212 




162 


50 


12.8 


12.9 


12.4 


Montgomery 


3 


,306 


3 


,114 


192 


5.8 


6.0 


3.4 


Prince George's 


3 


,483 


2 


,833 


650 


5.1 


5.8 


3.4 


Queen Anne's 




211 




163 


48 


10.3 


10.0 


11.4 


St. Mary's 




277 




221 


56 


5.3 


5.2 


5.8 


Somerset 




212 




160 


52 


10.8 


13.1 


7.1 


Talbot 




284 




211 


73 


11.1 


10.6 


12.8 


Washington 




986 




965 


21 


9.1 


9.3 


4.4 


Wicomico 




568 




446 


122 


9.6 


9.7 


9.4 


Worcester 




259 




185 


74 


9.6 


9.8 


9.1 



(1) 



Per 1,000 population. 



Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maryland Center for Health 
Statistics, Annual Vital Statistics Report , 1975. 



EDUCATION 

Education has been standing in the spotlight of publicity throughout the 
Seventies. Nearly 861,000 people were enrolled in public schools throughout 
Maryland in 1976. Following the national trend, elementary school enrollment 
has been declining due to decreases in the population of persons of elementary 
school age. Despite the decreases in births, nursery school attendance has 
been climbing. While most formal education takes place in the public school 
environment, approximately three-fourths of nursery school enrollment is in 
private schools. 

On a statewide basis, the cost per pupil has risen to $1,458, and the 
number of pupils per teacher and administrator has declined to 18.3. 

Public high schools in Maryland graduated more than 56,000 students in 
1976, a figure more than 3.5 per cent higher than the one recorded two years 
earlier. And, A2.8 per cent of these graduates continued into higher education. 

Nearly 31,000 full time students were enrolled for the Fall 1976 term in 
the 20 two-year colleges here. If one includes part time students, the figure 
rises to almost 82,000. The 28 four-year colleges and universities compiled 
a full time undergraduate enrollment in excess of 69,000 students. Added to 
this figure are the more than 29,000 part time students and the 30,000 graduate 
students, bringing the total to over 211,000 students enrolled in institutions 
of higher education in Maryland. 



NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1976 



POLITICAL 






SUBDIVISION 


TOTAL 


ELEMENTS 


MARYLAND 


1,347 


912 


Allegany 


34 


23 


Anne Arundel 


107 


75 


Baltimore City 


200 


143 


Baltimore 


162 


109 


Calvert 


13 


8 


Caroline 


9 


4 


Carroll 


29 


16 


Cecil 


25 


16 


Charles 


27 


16 


Dorchester 


15 


7 


Frederick 


36 


24 


Garrett 


16 


11 


Harford 


39 


26 


Howard 


45 


26 


Kent 


8 


4 


Montgomery 


199 


141 


Prince George's 


234 


171 


Queen Anne ' s 


9 


5 


St. Mary's 


25 


18 


Somerset 


17 


9 


Talbot 


13 


8 


Washington 


45 


28 


Wicomico 


25 


16 


Worcester 


15 


8 



combined(i) 



22 

45 

45 

3 

4 
5 
6 
5 
3 



7 

1 

52 
62 

1 
3 
4 

3 
7 

7 
4 



3 

10 

12 

8 

2 



3 
6 
5 

4 
3 
5 
12 
3 

6 

1 
3 
4 
4 

2 
10 

2 
3 



^-'-^ Includes middle and other schools. 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Research, Evaluation, 

and Information Systems, Number of Maryland Public Schools by Organization , 
Enrollment, and Staff, September 30, 1976 , March 1977 report. 



o <^ 



vD ro O C 



00 O in v£) o^ oo 
O O iH 1— I vO vO 
O 0> CM LO -H r— I 



00 C30 ro m 

v£) 00 (N rH 

00 o cn .H 



O^O 00CMONa> t-HOvO 

oovo inoOiHCN) rgr^n^ 
a^ 00 ro <!• ,— I 



.-I 0^ O 
in <r r^ 



O 00 CN CN 00 - 

00 in CNi cr, in c 
o •<r vD r-- o r 



o o o 
ro <!• c^ 

CTN CN vO 






00 ,H 



(-1 I C "O ^ J-i I C ^3 

iTis-iPn-^T-ii-iPri 



^t^ WCOCtii WCO faajsxi- 



4J UK 



^— - * C/2 



^2 

H > 



I— I CNl vD ^ 00 



in o^ CJN o> r 



< iH tH LD iH 



vD CNi in cNi r~- 
ro in r^ O vo 



r- <r <r <r ro 

0> CN 1^ CTn CM 



1 vO ON CTi -d" 



o (— I I— I m ro 



cvj t-H -d- in m 
cNj iH <r CO <r 



00 ON r-~ o ^ 

iH CNJ O CM rH 



00 vo r^ -d" CO 

CO CM CM <H <-H 



rH in o cs o fo 



00 (^ 00 <r v£) 
CO <r CO <d- CO 

\0 O O 00 CM 



<r ON O r^ CN 
in cN I— I in CO 

rH 00 CO CO O 



00 <]■ in r^ ^i- 
in -cr in in -J" 

ON 00 ON ^ <J" 



CM iH 00 ON r-~ 

<r rH CM vo in 

vO 00 <-l rH I 



Or~»<rONvD O-*C0r 

co.<rooinoo o>-irHc 
vDr^ootHcM inoococ 



in ON CO I — vo 



CO ON O <1" CO 

CJN CM r-- r^ csi 

ON ON CO iH ON 



t^ o r^ in o 

<t 00 -3- CO o 
<r r^ 00 o vo 



r^ <f -d- csi ~d- 



cNoovooco inr^cMrH 
r~inincjN<t <roNCN<d- 

CMinl^CJNCO vOi— IvDCO 



00 in CO CO rH 



J in CO <r CO 



vocooot^r^- oor-~ooNvo 
-<ftHr^roo c^jOcM-^rr-j 
cocMcn<i-<f ONr-.\DOON 



H nO CJN 00 CO 00 r~ 

- in CM CO m \o o 

- 00 vD O O ^ NO 



in <r <r NO 



^ ^. 



•H JJ X) 

u -u u "O 

(U 0) O >-i 

x) >-i M-i nj -u 

(U >-i l-i 15 C 



j:^ x: o o 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL, 
MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1975-1976 SCHOOL YEAR 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



ELEMENTARY 



SECONDARY 



MARYLAND 



18.3 



19.6 



17.0 



Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 



18.7 
18.8 
19.0 
17.6 
17.8 



20.6 
20.5 
19.4 
19.2 
18.1 



17.2 
17.1 
18.5 
16.2 
17.5 



Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 



18.3 
19.1 
20.1 
19.5 
16.5 



20.2 
18.9 
19.0 
24.0 
16.9 



16.7 
19.3 
21.4 
15.7 
16.1 



Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 



19.4 
17.7 
18.4 
17.8 
16.2 



20.0 
17.1 
20.1 
21.6 
15.1 



18.8 
18.5 
16.7 
14.7 
17.4 



Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 



17.7 
18.2 
18.9 
17.8 
18.7 



20.2 
18.8 
19.1 
21.7 
20.8 



15.7 
17.6 
18.7 
14.3 
16.9 



Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



14.9 
18.0 
17.7 
16.2 



17.1 
19.3 
19.2 
16.4 



13.1 
16.7 
16.3 
16.1 



Source: Unpublished data furnished by Maryland State Department of Education. 



NO. 24 

ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY TEACHERS AND 
PRINCIPALS IN MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 
1974 Aim 1977 



POLITICAL PER CENT CHANGE 

SUBDIVISION 1977 1974 1974/1977 



MARYLAND 45,767 45,094 1.5 

Allegany 794 815 -2.6 

Anne Arundel 3,961 3,787 4.6 

Baltimore City 8,719 8,267 5.5 

Baltimore 6,528 6,589 -0.9 

Calvert 382 331 15.4 

Caroline 276 264 4.5 

Carroll 981 959 2.3 

Cecil 629 614 2.4 

Charles 845 789 7.1 

Dorchester 328 338 -3.0 

Frederick 1,062 1,076 -1.3 

Garrett 306 297 3.0 

Harford 1,784 1,722 3.6 

Howard 1,295 1,174 10.3 

Kent 192 205 -6.3 

Montgomery 6,531 6,627 -1.4 

Prince George's 7,467 7,636 -2.2 

Queen Anne's 246 239 -2.9 

St. Mary's 632 592 6.8 

Somerset 234 224 4.5 

Talbot 287 291 -1.4 

Washington 1,197 1,167 2.6 

Wicomico 749 722 3.8 

Worcester 382 369 3.5 



Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Administration, 
Staff Employed at School and Central Office Levels, Maryland Public 
Schools, 1976-1977. 



COST PER PUPIL BELONGING: CURRENT EXPENSES, MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, BY 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1975-1976 SCHOOL YEAR 



POLITICAL PER CENT RECEIVED 

SUBDIVISION TOTAL FROM STATE 



MARYLAND $ 1,458 35.2 

Montgomery 1,877 22.1 

Baltimore 1,518 28.6 

Prince George's 1,489 32.2 

Howard 1,466 28.5 

Baltimore City 1,445 47.2 

Talbot 1,422 28.5 

Dorchester 1,408 40.5 

Calvert 1,400 38.2 

Worcester 1,351 26.5 

Kent 1,342 40.2 

Allegany 1,306 42.3 

Anne Arundel 1,283 38.9 

Washington 1,270 39.1 

St. Mary's 1,253 46.9 

Frederick 1,245 43.1 

Harford 1,243 43.2 

Charles 1,215 44.5 

Wicomico 1,200 46.6 

Somerset 1,171 47.1 

Queen Anne's 1,169 41.7 

Carroll 1,142 42.7 

Caroline 1,140 51.2 

Cecil 1,137 47.6 

Garrett 1,037 52.3 



Maryland State Department of Education, Facts About Maryland Public 
Education , 1976-1977. 



-34- 



AVERAGE SALARY (1) PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL, MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, BY 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1975-1976 SCHOOL YEAR 





ALL PUBLIC SCHOOLS 


ELEMENTARY 




SECONDARY 




POLITICAL 




PRTN- 


TEA- 




PRIN- 


TEA- 




PR™- /9> 


TEA- 


SUBDIVISION 


TOTAL 


CIPALS^^^ 


CHERS 


TOTAL 


CIPALS^^^ 


CHERS 


TOTAL 


CIPALS^"^^ 


CHERS 


MARYLAND 


$14,507 


$22,277 


$14,075 


$14,005 


$22,090 


$13,494 


$14,997 


$22,512 


$14,633 


Allegany 


13,595 


18,770 


13,264 


13,146 


18,169 


12,812 


13,995 


19,349 


13,665 


Anne Arundel 


14,196 


21,717 


13,855 


13,956 


21,870 


13,527 


14,422 


21,509 


14,159 


Baltimore City 


12,890 


19,133 


12,590 


12,617 


18,982 


12,265 


13,186 


19,354 


12,937 


Baltimore 


16,005 


24,359 


15,473 


15,282 


24,931 


14,568 


16,651 


25,461 


16,260 


Calvert 


13,288 


21,258 


12,759 


13,512 


20,163 


12,995 


13,091 


22,552 


12,554 


Caroline 


11,493 


17,513 


11,185 


11,063 


17,536 


10,833 


11,932 


17,500 


11,557 


Carroll 


11,657 


19,290 


11,258 


11,118 


18,789 


10,723 


12,352 


19,915 


11,949 


Cecil 


12,843 


20,350 


12,393 


12,200 


20,058 


11,741 


13,466 


20,618 


13,026 


Charles 


13,042 


21,733 


12,596 


13,157 


22,706 


12,677 


12,947 


20,959 


12,529 


Dorchester 


12,855 


18,370 


12,490 


12,448 


17,995 


12,095 


13,395 


18,831 


13,021 


Frederick 


13,068 


21,785 


12,554 


12,164 


19,921 


11,568 


13,994 


25,223 


13,531 


Garrett 


10,846 


15,974 


10,491 


10,485 


15,481 


10,047 


11,395 


17,453 


11,137 


Harford 


13,205 


20,990 


12,828 


13,030 


20,256 


12,592 


13,380 


22,174 


13,059 


Howard 


14,241 


23,949 


13,746 


14,189 


25,468 


13,701 


14,285 


23,004 


13,783 


Kent 


11,858 


20,767 


11,215 


11,411 


21,349 


10,708 


12,395 


20,095 


11,827 


Montgomery 


18,122 


28,068 


17,591 


17,378 


28,428 


16,690 


18,745 


27,667 


18,334 


Prince George's 


15,177 


22,471 


14,677 


14,900 


22,688 


14,324 


15,471 


22,201 


15,049 


Queen Anne ' s 


11,860 


19,171 


11,478 


10,002 


19,201 


9,561 


13,393 


19,195 


13,387 


St. Mary's 


11,508 


17,747 


11,152 


11,374 


16,694 


11,084 


11,631 


18,642 


11,216 


Somerset 


10,470 


14,495 


10,139 


10,680 


15,030 


10 , 300 


10,311 


14,047 


10,018 


Talbot 


12,125 


17,940 


11,825 


11,913 


18,648 


11,659 


12,297 


17,587 


11,964 


Washington 


13,235 


19,542 


12,866 


12,126 


18,305 


11,732 


14,301 


20,953 


13,947 


Wicomico 


11,982 


17,900 


11,586 


12,027 


17,294 


11,569 


11,937 


18,956 


11,602 


Worcester 


12,558 


20,113 


12,201 


11,731 


19,248 


11,416 


13,396 


20,815 


13,005 



(1) 



Excludes aides. 



^^' Includes principals and assistant principals classified according to time spent in teaching 
and administrative responsibilities. 

Source: Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Administration, Selected 
Financial Data, Maryland Public Schools 1975-76 Part III (May, 1977) . 



HOLDING POWER OF PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS IN MARYLAND, 
BY POLICITAL SUBDIVISION: 1976 AND 1974 



SUBDIVISION 



1976 
PER CENT 



1974 
PER CENT 



MARYLAND 



79.8 



Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 



88.3 
72.6 
60.2 
86.0 
72.4 



90.9 
84.9 
63.9 
84.8 
64.8 



Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 



79.9 
88.2 
74.9 
71.7 
71.7 



76.9 
88.6 
71.0 
72.8 
73.7 



Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George ' 
Queen Anne ' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



83.8 
77.4 
79.1 
92.4 
67.3 

93.4 
76.3 
78.5 
62.4 
65.9 

74.5 
79.1 
75.9 
76.9 



91.3 
83.9 
73.6 
93.6 
83.0 

99.0 
74.4 
71.2 
64.1 
73.1 

75.4 
76.2 
73.7 
77.9 



Holding power refers to the number of graduates as percentage of ninth grade 
enrollment four years earlier. 

Source: Maryland Department of Education, Facts About Maryland Public 
Education, 1974-75 and 1976-77. 



-36- 



W 2 c 



O H 



en r^ r-- vo o 
00 o in vo 00 



O <1- CO vo O 



a^ <J- o vo in 



S O r 



\0 r^ CO CO \D 
r^ vO in in o 



rr^OCNi.-H ootnr 
1 00 vo <r O CM og c 



CO (Tv CO 00 in 



vO \0 0^ ^D 
rH <r> 00 in 



Pi Pi r 

PL, td r 



00 r^ ^ in in 


vo 1^ o <r CO 


CO CTi CO r^ vD 


m CM CTN vO ON 


N/A 
33.2 
38.7 
35.6 


O O CO o o 
<f in sj- in CM 


v£) vD vO 00 CM 
CM CO CO CO CSJ 


r-l <N vO -H -<r 

■^ CO in vD CO 


^D 00 CO r^ ON 

^D CO CO CN CO 



CO <r <r CO CM V 
00 o- iH 00 m r 
m cNi .H -^ vo c 



J 00 \£> v£> <r 



CO -vT 00 \0 00 

,H CO cvj r^ .H 



CO 00 tH O CM 

CO 00 ON iH r^ 



o o o -a t 



vD CO 00 >3- 


cN vo ON ^ in 




M 00 \0 CO 


CO in CM o 


CM .-H ON CM O 


00 c 


O vO rH CO 


-* 00 00 vt 






o ON in cN 



CO vo iH 00 VD 



H > 



g (U Qj 

>^ 3 !-i M 

C Vj O O -U 

CO <; e 6 Vj 

00 -H -H 0) 

(U 0) J-J AJ > 

iH C '-I fH rH 

r-j 5 to CO td 

<; ^ pa pQ u 



u u o o o 



T3 >-i "+-1 CO W 



pt, o K ffi 1^: 



0) o 



5 >^ -u 



; CL, o" w w 



cj a) CO (u 
u s u u 



SOURCE OF CURRENT FUNDS AND DISBURSEMENTS, MARYLAND 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS: SCHOOL YEAR 1975-1976 



INCOME SOURCE OR AMOUNT PER CENT OF 

DISBURSEMENT ($) TOTAL 



Income Source 

Federal Funds $ 84,692,139 6.4 

State Funds 467,057,247 35.2 

Local Funds 773,741,995 58.4 

Disbursements 

Instruction 858,026,134 65.9 

Maintenance and Operation 172,853,667 13.3 

Other^l) 178,355,536 13.7 

Pupil Transportation 57,927,169 4.5 

Administration 34,395,314 2.6 



^ -'Includes fixed charges, outgoing transfers, pupil personnel services, health 
services, food services, student body activities, community services, food 
service programs, teachers retirement and Social Security. 

Source: Maryland State Department of Education, Facts About Maryland Public 
Education , 1976-1977. 



CAPITAL EXPENDITURES, MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, BY 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1975-1976 SCHOOL YEAR 





POLITICAL 








^MINISTRATION 


SUBDIVISION 


TOTAL 


ELEMENTARY 


SECONDARY 


BUILDINGS 


MARYLAND $ 


202,478,441 


$ 71,382,330 


$ 127,652,301 : 


$ 3,443,810 


Allegany 


5,110,917 


4,425,895 


647,268 


37,754 


Anne Arundel 


24,483,006 


1,186,270 


23,107,591 


189,145 


Baltimore City 


26,660,908 


19,057,219 


6,581,813 


21,876 


Baltimore 


13,487,627 


4,130,674 


9,270,029 


86,924 


Calvert 


5,242,627 


302,383 


4,846,781 


93,463 


Caroline 


3,816,507 


1,604,443 


2,201,904 


10,160 


Carroll 


12,022,601 


7,757,638 


4,264,963 


- 


Cecil 


3,445,831 


1,450,703 


1,990,973 


4,155 


Charles 


10,563,251 


2,901,827 


7,641,358 


20,066 


Dorchester 


7,317,737 


2,960,306 


4,356,459 


972 


Frederick 


12,217,334 


3,178,525 


8,492,154 


546,655 


Garrett 


5,930,311 


2,701,698 


3,214,487 


14,126 


Harford 


1,876,807 


314,783 


1,562,024 


- 


Howard 


16,117,929 


363,701 


15,741,477 


12,751 


Kent 


1,213,544 


1,136,684 


54,883 


21,977 


Montgomery 


22,030,915 


8,131,524 


12,156,674 


1,742,717 


Prince George's 


11,224,374 


3,615,848 


7,161,285 


447,241 


Queen Anne's 


220,008 


55,427 


164,581 


- 


St. Mary's 


4,298,163 


2,146,052 


2,149,497 


2,614 


Somerset 


106,070 


33,758 


72,312 


- 


Talbot 


1,527,553 


18,574 


1,508,979 


_ 


Washington 


9,436,445 


1,645,258 


7,778,159 


13,028 


Wicomico 


1,772,668 


281,617 


1,490,955 


96 


Worcester 


2,355,308 


1,981,523 


195,695 


178,090 


Source: Maryland 


State Department of Education, 


Division of Administration, 


Selected 


Financial Data, 


Maryland Public Schools 1975-76 


, Part II 



(February 1977). 



-39- 



NO. 31 

ENROLLMENT IN STATE ACCREDITED TWO YEAR COLLEGES: 1976 



Allegany Community College 



(1) 



(1) 



Anne Arundel Coininunity College 
Bay College of Maryland(2) 
Catonsville Community College^ ^ 
Cecil Community College^-'-) 

Charles County Community College^!) 
Chesapeake College (l) 
Community College of Baltimore '■'■^ 
Dundalk Community College^-'-) 
Essex Community College (-'-) 

Frederick Community College ^-'-^ 
Garrett Community College^-'-) 
Hagerstown Business College^^^ 
Hagerstown Junior College^-*-) 
Harford Community College^-'-) 

Howard Community College (■'-) 

Montgomery College (1) 

Prince George's Community College^-'-) 

Villa Julie College(2) 

Wor-Wic Tech Community College (-'■) 





FULL TIME 


PART TIME 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


1,832 


1,287 


545 


6,544 


2,344 


4,200 


1,011 


947 


64 


10,327 


2,862 


7,465 


1,359 


546 


813 


2,180 


673 


1,507 


821 


325 


496 


9,451 


3,805 


5,646 


2,224 


680 


1,544 


9,496 


3,021 


6,475 


1,716 


621 


1,095 


519 


256 


263 


377 


377 





1,972 


901 


1,071 


3,400 


1,127 


2,273 


2,023 


564 


1,459 


13,984 


5,788 


8,196 


11,915 


4,060 


7,855 


590 


381 


209 


192 


64 


128 



(1) Public. 

(2)private. 

Source: Unpublished data from Maryland State Board of Higher Education. 



-40- 



r^ r-i 00 o o 
r^ O CNI 
oo ^ O 



O ^ CTl vD r 

00 a> 00 r 



in <r iH o vo r 

m r-l OO CM c 



in o ^ lo ^ 



oocyit^ooo <roinooo 
<r<^r^oocTN oom-HoovD 
CM <r <r vooooor^cTi 



r^ <3- oo ro <r 


ro vo O ON fO 


00 CM 00 O O 


r~- 00 r^ vx) >H 


CM 00 r^ .-1 CM 


.-1 CM ro ctn M 



^ %' 



CMOr^^^crr^ ONOrHrOvO 

<7\f^.-IO00 -d-CM^O^O 

CO.— looror^ oolna^oo.— i 



CTi m 00 in 00 

O in CTi iH rH 

CM in 00 .H ro 



C7N CTi rH m >— I 

<}■ <r 00 vo CO 

00 CTN in 00 in 

CM CO rH 



ctn <y> r^ I— I ON 

iH CM ON >— I CM 

o in C3N o <!■ 

o <r r^ rH 



(D N^ 



v_/ t3 Vj 



CO O <U O cfl 

S O bO Q 

S rH 4.) QJ 

(U (U rH 3 ■ 

bS) U O U 

dJ XI CJ -H O 

rH QJ 4-12 

rH ffi o; M 

O -u c •+^ 

U CU CO M o 

0) 



O -H CU 4-) (U 

•H 4-1 -iH -H rH 

4-1 rH 5 CU rH 

c rt o r3 o 

< PQ cQ a U 



QJrH (DO 
WS-' (U 

0) 0) rH 



W C U 



I 4-1 CO rH bO 

I 03 O tU 

4-1 bO U rH 



O 00 XI C rQ Q) U 



rH CL O 3 O 
O O S-i O O 

u a p^ o sc 



c <u 'O 0) 



I S to 4-J 



CO 
S T3 



(U q; i 

0) OO (30 ( 
4-1 OJ 0) I 



rH c w en en 

0) M - - - 

CO C >^ >^ 

tn T3 O CO CO 

M O •-) s s 

Vj CO • . . 

QJ QJ 4-1 iJ iJ 

2 Oi en CO (y^ 



I— I m <Ti O rH o> O f 



r-roinoO'— lOrou-irHcMCNi 



H-^CTivor^inc^^t 



^r^r-^r^oocNo-cMcNOa> 
^^r^<J•Lr|0^r^o^CNl0^c^JO^ 



^uir— It— ll^vtJCriCNII — i.')l 

r in >d- in vo cni c 



o 


4J 




t^ 




(U 


u 


(U 


CJ) 










tH 




00 




CO 


>. 


§ 






cu 


cu 


QJ^-N 


PQ 


4J 




QJ O 




rH 


■U.H 




•H 


o 


^ 


>-i o 


^ 




Ojw 


M-l 


O 


u 




O 


•H 


o 


+J <U 


O 






CO 


4= >N 


PQ 


CJ 


CAl 4-1 




0) 


(1) 


Ph 


W 4-1 






rt 


>^ 


>-i 


>-l 




•H 


C 


fl 


>% 4J 




1 




(U 


62 


o 


o 


M CO 


•H 




ao 




4-) 


3 


cn 






0) 


cu 0) 


ao 


ao 


^ C 


>-i 


4-1 






4J > 


p 


C 


CD O 


0) 


rH 






CO 'H 






•H m 


> 


CO 


CO 


o 


^^ 


42 


jn 


d g 




CQ 


PQ 


o 


to 


CO 



v-^ CO 



NO. 33 
FOUR YEAR STATE ACCREDITED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN MARYLAND: 1976 



COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY 



PUBLIC MEN (M) EARNED DEGREES 

OR WOMEN (W) NUMBER TYPeCD 
PRIVATE COED (C) DEGREES OFFERED 



Antioch College Private C 

Baltimore Hebrew College Private C 

Bowie State College Public C 

Capitol Institute of Technology Private C 

College of Notre Dame of Maryland Private W 

Columbia Union College Private C 

Coppin State College Public C 

Frostburg State College Public C 

Goucher College Private W 

Hood College Private W 

Johns Hopkins University Private C 

Loyola College Private C 

The Maryland Institute Private C 

Morgan State University Public C 

Mount St. Mary's College Private C 

Ner Israel Rabbinical College Private M 

Peabody Institute of the City Private C 
of Baltimore 

St. John's College Private C 

St. Mary's College of Maryland Public C 

St. Mary's Seminary & University Private M^^) 

Salisbury State College Public C 



110 


B, M 




14 


B, M 




521 


B, M 




40 


A, B 




147 


B 




150 


A, B 




446 


B, M 




712 


B, M 




237 


B, M 




218 


B, M 




2,256 


B, M, 


D, P 


914 


B, M 




245 


B, M 




913 


B, M 




281 


B, M 




45 


M, D, 


Rabbi 


97 


B, M, 


D 


68 


B, M 




166 


B 




45 


B, M, 


D, L 


595 


B, M 





(continued on following page) 



NO. 33 
FOUR YEAR STATE ACCREDITED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN MARYLAND: 1976 (Cont'd.) 



COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY 



PUBLIC 


MEN 


(M) 




E.\RNED DEGREES 


OR 


WOMEN 


(W) 


NUMBER 




type(i) 


PRIVATE 


COED 


(C) 


DEGREES 




OFFERED 


Public 


C 




2,158 


B, 


M 


Public 


C 




1,003 


A, 


B, M, D, P 


Public 


c 




12,145 


A, 


B, M, D, P 


Private 


c 




57 


B, 


M 


Private 


c 




196 


B, 


. M 


Private 


C 




578 


B, 


, M 



Towson State University 
University of Baltimore 
University of Maryland 
Washington Bible College 
Washington College 
Western Maryland College 



^■'-''A-Associate 
B-Bachelor 's 
D-Doctor 's 
L-Licentiate 
P-Professional School 
M-Master* s 

^•^^Evening classes are coeducational. 

Source: Maryland State Board for Higher Education, Trends in Degrees Awarded by 
Maryland Institutions of Higher Education . 



HEALTH SERVICES 

During the 1977 Fiscal Year Maryland's hospitals for the mentally ill 
treated over 15,000 patients, a decrease of 4 per cent from the number of 
patients treated during 1976. This decrease continues a trend observed for 
several years which may be due to shortened periods of hospitalization of new 
admissions and the gradual continuing decrease in the number of long term 
patients. The average daily size of the patient population declined 2.3 per 
cent during this period, from 4,205 in 1976 to 4,109 in 1977. 

It is generally believed that the rate of occurrence of most mental 
illnesses has not changed appreciably and that these expanding figures 
reflect the growing acceptance and usage of psychiatric hospitals and clinics 
for the short term intensive treatment of alcoholism and acute psychoneurotic 
and personality disturbances. 

This section of the Abstract is expanded from earlier editions to include 
general health care as well as mental health care. Overall, there were more 
than 21,500 hospital beds in the State as of March 31, 1977, and there were 
just over 22,800 beds in other types of health care facilities here. And, 
according to the most recent data available (1975), there were, on a State- 
wide average, 615 Marylanders per physician providing direct patient care. 
As one might expect, there is considerable variation among the political 
subdivisions of the State. 



NO. 34a 

DISTRIBUTION OF PHYSICIANS, AND NUMBER OF BEDS 
IN HOSPITALS IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 







NUMBER OF 


NUMBER OF 


PERSONS PER 




BEDS 


BEDS^^) IN 


PHYSICIAN PRO- 


POLITICAL 


IN 


LICENSED 


VIDING DIRECT 
PATIENT CARE (2) 


SUBDIVISION 


HOSPITALS (1) 


INSTITUTIONS (3) 


Allegany 


684 


288 


810 


Anne Arundel 


1,340 


789 


1,339 


Baltimore City 


8,370 


5,604 


273 


Baltimore 


3,084 


5,944 


1,287 


Calvert 


78 


97 


2,694 


Caroline 





52 


4,316 


Carroll 


1,874 


818 


1,128 


Cecil 


174 


136 


1,865 


Charles 


108 


121 


2,237 


Dorchester 


586 


181 


746 


Frederick 


216 


598 


1,421 


Garrett 


72 


199 


3,019 


Harford 


449 


395 


1,428 


Howard 


487 


16 


613 


Kent 


80 


29 


1,038 


Montgomery 


1,492 


2,908 


421 


Prince George's 


1,009 


2,236 


1,271 


Queen Anne's 





12 


4,080 


St. Mary's 


82 


66 


1,919 


Somerset 


36 


64 


1,955 


Talbot 


226 


330 


413 


Washington 


598 


1,197 


1,047 


Wicomico 


556 


762 


547 


Worcester 





45 


1,932 


MARYLAND 


21,601 


22,887 


615 



'-•-^Includes General Hospitals, Chronic Disease Hospitals, Mental Institutions, Tubercu- 
losis Institutions, hospitals in Penal Institutions and Special Hospitals. As of 



(2) 



(3) 



March 31, 1977. 

Based on population figures for 1975, from Department of Health and Mental Hygiene 
report issued June, 1977. Data concerning the number of physicians as of December 
31, 1975. 

Includes Nursing Homes, Intermediate Care Facilities, Domiciliary Care, and Resi- 
dential Treatment Centers for Emotionally Disturbed Children and/or Adolescents. 



Sources: Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Licensing 
and Certification, Directory of Acute General Hospitals and Special Hospitals , 
February 1977. 

Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Licens- 
ing and Certification, Directory of Licensed Institutions , March 31, 1977. 

American Medical Association, Physician Distribution and Medical Licensure 
in the U. S. , 1975 . 

-46- 



NO. 34b 

PATIENT POPULATION, STATE PSYCHIATRIC INPATIENT FACILITIES, 
FISCAL YEARS 1973-1977 



AVERAGE SIZE OF TOTAL NUMBER TOTAL 

FISCAL YEAR PATIENT POPULATION TREATED ADMISSIONS SEPARATIONS 



1977 






4,109 






15,480 






10,160 




10,073 


1976 






4,205 






16,118 






10,366 




10,318 


1975 






4,665 






17,918 






10,885 




10,898 


1974 






5,352 






20,660 






12,512 




12,592 


1973 






5,675 






21,987 






13,079 




13,152 


Source : 


Maryland Department of Mental Hygiene, Maryland Center for Health 
Statistics. Data for 1975, 1976 and 1977 obtained from Statistical Report 
for July 1, 1976-May 31, 1977. Data for 1973 and 1974 obtained from 
Statistical Report for July 1, 1973-June 30, 1974. 



CLIMATE OF MARYLAND 

Maryland lies in the region midway between the rigorous climates of the 
North and the mild climates of the South. Since it is located in the middle 
latitudes where the general atmospheric flow is from West to East across 
North America, it has a continental type of climate with its marked temperature 
contrast between summer and winter; however, two important bodies of water, 
the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean have an important modifying control 
on the climate, especially by moderating extreme temperatures of adjacent areas. 

The average annual temperature ranges from 48° F. in the Garrett County 
area to 59° F. in the lower Chesapeake Bay area. The highest temperature on 
record is 109° recorded at several places in Allegany and Frederick Counties 
while the lowest is -40° F. at Oakland, Garrett County. Based on the 1931 - 
1960 and 1941 - 1970 periods, the average annual precipitation ranges from as 
much as 46 to 49 inches at opposite ends of the State, Allegany Plateau and 
Southern Eastern Shore, to as little as 36 inches in the Cumberland area located 
in the "rain shadow" just to the east of the Allegany Plateau. Elsewhere over 
the State, the annual precipitation ranges monthly betwen 40 to 44 inches. 
Monthly distribution is quite uniform, averaging between 2 and 4 inches each 
month and reaching a maximum between 4 and 6 inches in July or August. Annual 
snowfall ranges from a minimum of 8 to 10 inches along the coastal areas of 
southern Eastern Shore to a maximum of near 100 inches in parts of Garrett 
County. 

Prevailing winds are mostly from the west-northwest to northwest except 
during the months of May through September when they become more southerly. 
Damaging or dangerous storms, such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and blizzards, 
are infrequent. 

-48- 



The climate of Maryland is a dependable natural resource which provides 
an excellent setting for the agricultural, industrial, commercial and recrea- 
tional activities of its citizens. 

Included within this section is a rather detailed table showing cloud 
cover conditions in Maryland. It is indeed interesting to note the variations 
in the amoimt of cloud cover from region to region. These conditions determine 
the feasibility of many horticultural projects. 



LOCATION OF MARYLAND WEATHER STATIONS FOR WHICH 
CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA ARE PRESENTED 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



LATITUDE 
(NORTH) 



LONGITUDE 
(WEST) 



ELEVATION 
(FEET) 



Annapolis (U. S. Naval 
(Academy) 

Baltimore Weather Bureau 
(City Office Customs 
House) 



Anne Arundel 38°59' 



Baltimore City 39°17' 



76°29' 



Baltimore Weather Bureau 
(Baltimore-Washington 
International Airport) 



Anne Arundel 



39°11' 



Boyds (2 miles northwest) 


Montgomery 


30^12' 


77°20' 


580 


Cambridge 


Dorchester 


38°34' 


76°09' 


5 


Centreville 


Queen Anne's 


39°03' 


76°03' 


46 


Chestertown 


Kent 


39°13' 


76°04' 


35 


Clarksville (3 miles 


Howard 


39°15' 


76°56' 


365 


north-northeast) 










College Park 


Prince George's 


38°59' 


76°56' 


70 


Conowingo Dam 


Harford 


39039. 


76°10' 


40 


Crisfield Dam 


Somerset 


37°59' 


75°52' 


7 


Cumberland 


Allegany 


39039. 


78°45' 


945 


Denton 


Caroline 


38°54' 


75°51' 


40 


Easton 


Talbot 


38°45' 


76°04' 


40 


Elkton 


Cecil 


3903Q. 


75°50' 


28 


Frederick 


Frederick 


39025. 


71°28' 


435 


Frostburg 


Allegany 


39039. 


78°56' 


2,035 


Glenn Dale Bell 


Prince George's 


38''58' 


76°48' 


150 


Hagerstovm 


Washington 


39033, 


77°41' 


560 


Hancock 


Washington 


39°42' 


78°11' 


428 



(continued on following page) 



-50- 



LOCATION OF MARYLAND WEATHER STATIONS FOR V7HICH 
CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA ARE PRESENTED (Cont'd.) 









POLITICAL 


LATITUDE 


LONGITUDE 


ELEVATION 


STATION 




SUBDIVISION 


(NORTH) 


(WEST) 


(FEET) 


La Plata 




Charles 


38°32' 


77°00' 


140 


Leonardtown 




St. Mary's 


38°19' 


76°40' 


40 


Millington 




Kent 


39°16' 


76°51' 


30 


Oakland 




Garrett 


39°24' 


79°24' 


2,420 


Ocean City 




Worcester 


38°20' 


75°05' 


17 


Owings Ferry Landing 


Calvert 


38°42' 


76°41' 


120 


Princess Anne 




Somerset 


38°13' 


75°41' 


20 


Salisbury 




Wicomico 


38°22' 


75°35' 


10 


Snow Hill 




Worcester 


38m' 


75°24' 


14 


Solomons 




Calvert 


38°19' 


76°27' 


12 


Towson 




Baltimore 


39024. 


76°37' 


410 


Upper Marlboro 




Prince George's 


33052 . 


76°47' 


98 


Washington 




District of 


38°51' 


77°02' 


10 


(National Airport) 


Columbia 








Westminster 




Carroll 


39035, 


77°00' 


770 


Wheaton Regional 


Park 


Montgomery 


39°04' 


77°02' 


330 


Woodstock 




Baltimore 


39°20' 


76°52' 


415 



hJ W O C/D 

N O >-i 

w w M <d 



o 


t", 


^ 


u 


^ 


^j 


O 


J 


> 


> 


OJ 


0) 




fl) 




CU 


0) 


OJ 


o 


C) 


















z 


IS 


m 


on 




o 


^ 


^ 


<t 


o 




m 


'"' 


iH 


00 




iH 


CN 




tH 


vD 


.H 



o o o o 



OOOJOOOOOOO 



Q W 

O PM 
M 

Pi W 



M PL, 



o o 






W C3 PQ 

*^ ^ ^ 

pJ M P^ 

Pi o 



< w ! 



S 13 Pj 

W O g c 



in 


m CTN 


vO 


-H 


^ 


00 


v£3 




CN 


.H CM 


CM ^-v CNJ 


CNl 


CSI 




^ 




J3 C 






Pm 


43 


C 
^ 


:2 



s :§ s - 



CO 




1 


^1 


!-i 


u 


CO (X O- 

S <d <! 


<r 


\o 


CN 


r^ 0^ 


:^ 


CN 


ro ON 


u 
a. 
< 


1 


3 




u 

ex 


1- 


5-1 >. M 



^S 



^^ 



' -a (u c c 



^ ^ 



wcocji— |ct3cO(UV-Ii— j 
PhD::c/3<:cjHOPm<!c 



w >^ x: • 

• <U Cd r 
tD Xl CU 

^-^ CO 12 f 

o ^ 



v-' o o 



J2 .Hv_x 0) a (1) o 

W 4-1 ^-N >H S t-H 

CO cO-l-J (U.H 0-— I >%C 



•H -U CO <U 



O T3 > J-i > -H r 



p. > -H )-i M . 



C( (u c 






3OC'Hj34-tC0>-'(UC000( 



-52- 



Q) 


.H^— ' 






.^ 


3 


d 


•H 


^ c 


c 


rl 


u 


.n 






cu o 


o 


o 


a) 




c 


cn 


•e -^ 






X) 


cn 


c 


•H 


6 C 


Cfl 


^ 


!" 


o 


01 



00>-i3CU 

OCJUOQWWIi^pMO 



ffi 


w 






c^ 








'<<: 








w 


1 






^ 


w 


Q 






M 


o 


>> 


w 


W 




< 






w 


Q 


w 








> 


M^ 






<: 


O 







: w S 



W c_> S 
> o w 
<: o H 



[/: O PQ 
< IS 

hJ M Pi 

C« O 

O W H 

W M C/3 CNI 



O O O O O (U o 
2; O 2; S Z O Z 



> 4-1 4-1 4-1 4-J 



o o o o o z o 



M)-i43 Xi ,a Xi XXX 

SSP^ pMpLHpLl (i(fl4pL| 



00 rn cTi in <— I 



, >, i-l V4 ^^ >-l M 

i< cfl ex (H. P< ctJ CX 

: g <: < < s < 









r^ 




M 


M 


en 








•H 


0) 


^ 




4:: 


x: 


!-4 






tn 


en 


01 








nj 


x: 


■u 


,aj 



4J 4J QJ O '■ 



:2;3uc/3w:2a c^pqcl, 



s^ I 





























rH 































03 































d 
















QJ 






>^ 


<^ 


1 





















C 









p^ 












g 






^ 




X 






03 




00 




C/-^ 




d >^ 






-H 


w 


T3 


fe 


tu 


<u 




13 CO 






4-1 


bO 




>-i 


>-i 


C 






»t-v 


^ 


0^ 


ca 






C 


cn 




CO 


QJ 


03 


j:: 


en 




U 


4-1 ^ 


4J 


t3 


&0 t_3 


•H 


CD 




s: 


> 







d 


CS-' 





m 


CO 


!-i 


c 




^3 


a; 


C 






^ 


u 


•H 


^ 




M 




CO 


•H C 


M 


C 


a 





j-i 


c 


03 


6 


4-1 M 


en 


<u 


PL. 


d 


rH CO 


d 


CO 


c 


m 


OJ 


5 


43 


0) 




03 03 


T3 


M C 







.H CU 




hJ 


•H 


'? 


p. 






en 




(U &4 





CO CO 


.3 


^ 


•^c^ 


a 




u 

PL, 



H 


a. 










g 


:i 



o 


H 


w 


O 


C/3 

< 


i 


pq 


hJ 


< 


w 


H 


(.'3 


^ 


^ 


W 


^ 


N 


< 


Ix 






n 


hJ 


^ 


^ 


o 


Pm 


0^ 



W I w 

hJ W O >H 

M o <d 

W W M Q 

O U Pd 

<^ S w z 

Pd pt, pL, M 

< o 



fe kJ Pi 
O Pi^ H 



g^ 



<: 3 

hJ M Pi 

Pi o 
p^ P-I 



^gl 



hJ o 

< M 

U CO 

M M 

H > 

o pa 

PL, ED 



> CJ o 
O <U 0) 

2: Q o 



4J > > u 
u o O OJ 

o ;z; 2 Q I 



CM CNJ OJ CN ON 



CX 4-1 J-1 > > 

(U o o o o 
w o o a a 



CO (1) QJ 

:s P^ p^ 



^:§^s ^ 



'^r' <r1 <n "^ V 



Q) e OJ (1) J-i i-H 

)-i O O > 4-1 O 

>-i a >-i .H m o 

0) -H O Cd -H 

o :3 :2 a Q 



4-1 c XI PC o q -u . 



HCQO >^2;^r^ OiH co^ 
3 O cfl cd C O CO 

5 pq o w c/D c/3 :2 



CO CT\ 



cfl 


c 


H 


(1) 




6 


i-H 




u 


u 




crt 


0) 


a 




«P 



s ^ 



^^ N_^ CO 



<r o 


en 


m on 


CO o 


00 


O 00 

ro d 





in 


o 


?^ 


v£> 
VD 


vC vD 


ON vO 
~d- CN 


in 


vO 


2 


in 

vO 


o en 

O 00 


.-H O 

LO en 


v£) 


rH 


o 


00 

in 


O vO 

C3^ 00 


CN <t 
00 vO 




t-H 
00 


H 




en in 

ON (JN 

<»■ in 



en ON 


ON 


00 

O 

en o 


00 vO 


in 


o 
<r o 


ON CN 

<r ON 

00 vO 


'~l 


00 
00 

en o 


en <t 
00 vO 


<7N 


o 
en CD 


r^ in 


M 


CN 


CN in 




en o 


00 ON 

CN en 


<3- 
CO 
in 


en o 


in T-f 
in en 


<r 


S" 


<r en 

-d- CN 


in 

en 


00 OvI 

CN <r 


in CN 
d r^ 

<3- CN 


CJN 

en 
en 


CO 

r-v 00 



ON 


r^ 


00 






C3N 


00 


ON 








in 


vO 


en 


o 


r^ 


m 


NO 


en 


O 


^ 


r^ 


CJN 


CN 




^. 


<r 


'^ 


O 




in 


<f 


<r 






m 


in 


in 






00 


vO 




<r 


o 


00 


NO 


r^ 


in 


o 


- 


-^ 


NO 


o 




o 


ON 


<3N 


in 




vO 


vO 


NO 






NO 


NO 


NO 






00 


vO 


■~" 


<r 


o 


00 


NO 


^ 


<r 


O 


CN 


NO 


<r 


[^ 




-^ 


^. 


r^ 


<r 




rn 












CN 








00 


NO 


r^ 


en 


o 


00 


NO 


■^ 


en 


o 


00 


-^ 


r^ 


vO 




^. 


>* 


^ 


in 




<r 










in 




<f 








in 


vO 


en 


o 




in 


NO 


en 


o 


CN 


<r 


GO 


O 




NO 


rH 


CJN 


;H 


CN 


in 


CN 








in 


<r 


<f 






vO 


<r 


in 


en 


o 


NO 


<r 


in 


en 


o 


o 


in 


00 


CJN 
NO 


r^ 


CN 


rH 


^. 


00 
C3N 


en 




CN 


CN 






«* 


•* 


<r 






in 




<r 


en 


in 


m 


cn 


■<r 


en 


en 


ON 


r^ 


00 


00 


-cr 


00 


NO 


r-. 


C3N 

00 


^ 




in 


■<r 






in 


r^ 


NO 






<r 


CM 


en 


CN 


NO 


<r 


CN 


cn 


04 


<r 


ON 


ON 


<r 


ON 


in 


^ 


o 


NO 


CJN 

o 


^ 




<r 


en 






<r 










<r 


CN 


en 


CN 


in 


<r 


CN 


en 


en 


<f 





5 3 












B e 
























X c 




M 






fe 


^g 












!>, 














c 




CO 






,c 


o 






(U 




4-1 


•H 


CO 


S 


u 


•H -H 


c 






o 


3 


ca m 


5 


CO 


o 


c 



4-1 O Q S 4-> H W 



B < < < (U < < 



c 




° 




u 


CU 


c^ 


C 


•H 


^ 


CO 




CO 


1 


^ 


^ 


0) 


J-i 


>-< 


o 


o 


p. 


B 






•H 


*-> 


<; 


CO 


rH 


S 


c 




o 


0) 


•H 


U 




o 




•H 


e 




01 






CO 


c 


CQ 


'-' 



)-l -H -H C 4-> 4-> O 

3 CO CO 6 CO O C 

4-1 Q O S 4J H W 

CO -H 

^4 . . . Q, . . 

(U 00 bO ao -H bO bO 

(X > > > o > > 

e <c <: < (u <: < 



^ X C M 

PL, ig -H N-' 

o S S >^ 

^ rH C 



~ -H CO 5 
C 4-> 4-1 O 

O CO O C 



0) bO 00 bC 'H bO bO 

o, > > p. a > > 
e <: <; <; cu < <; 



CO CD as 

r^ c-i <3- 
\£) <J- m 



r~» in vD ro o 



00 vo r-- ^r o 



vD 00 r^ 



a\ O ir, r-i 

• • • CO 

I — m \o fo o 



00 fn vo 

m IT) m 

00 vo r^ 

<} <-t m 

CO \£> r^ 

m CM 0^ 

CO es CM 

00 vo r- 

CO O CM 

in CO -d- 



r-- o a\ 

in CM CO 
00 vo r-. 



ON vo c 

in CM - 
vD <!■ I 



~3- r^ vo 
-d- v£> in 



J \o a^ 
H o o 



CO jj jj -u 



O CO O C O • rH 



OJ 60 60 00 tH 60 60 ^-^ 
(X > > > O > > 

e < < < <!)<:<: 





X 


c 




M 






fa 


^s 


K^ 


^ 




^ 










c 










>, 




o 








.H 








CO 


5 


u 




•H 


c 






o 


3 


CO 


CO 


^ 


CO 


o 


c 




Q 


o 


4J 


H 


C/D 
















V^ 








a 






<u 


OB 


60 


to 




60 


60 


o- 


> 


> 


> 




> 


> 


B 


<: 


<: 


< 


(U 


< 


<: 



J o S S >. -H VO 

^ w rH c CO I r- 

>^ >^ j= o iH >w as 

rHrHW-H CO STSrH 
. . -H -H C 4-J .U O M 

acocoocooco • 



^^ 



B < <3 < (U < < 



^ O CNI \D 

LO r~- vD • • 

•<r cNi rn mm 

• . • CN 00 

r-. in ^ . . 

in on <r mo 



CO OJ o 



r~- oo oo 

^ O 00 



oo 


LTl 


r^ 


o 

CO 


in 


vD 


m 


<r 


<js 


00 


>,o 


<T 



<j- CN m 

00 vo r~^ 

m rH CN 

in in in 

00 ^ r-- 

O CJN o 



00 v^ r-^ mo 



^ r^ ctn 
m vD <r 






r~- On m 
r-^ <r vo 



in 00 r~^ 

in r- ^o 

r-^ in ^ 

CN <J^ >— I 

o r~~ r^ 



O 00 ON 

a\ CD a\ 



a\ m 
m <t 



<r CN m 
<r vo in 



>^ >,^ O ,H 14-1 
^ ,H 4-1 -H CO 5 
•H -H C 4J -U O 



1 Q Q g U H c/: 



0) &0 00 GO -H 60 

a > > > cj > 



I -H -H C W 4-J O 
I CO CO O CO O C 
I Q Q S 4-1 H c/2 



e < < < <i) < < 



. . . a. • • 
0) cjo 00 00 -i-i 00 oo 

& > > > a > > 

e < < < £!;<:<: 



en 00 
en 00 



j in en 



vO oo 



a\ 


"^ 


f^-; 




ON 


ON 


<r 


^ 


vO 


en 


in 




vO 






in 




^D 






<r 


04 




m 


og 


<r 


^ 




en 


^ 


00 


vO 


<r 


r^ 


r-\ 


o 

00 




^ 


en 


^ 


in 




<r 


en 


^ 


in 


en 


<r 


en 


d 


ON 


vX> 


00 


CO 




■<r 


en 


ON 


vO 




o^ 










ON 


00 


00 







O O rH 

ON ro v£> 

r^ in ^o 

vo <H r^ 

in o cN 

00 vo r^ 

00 iH v£) 

^ rH CO 

00 vo r^ 

CM iH CNl 

m r- o 

00 in r^ 

<r in <r 



r- O <i- 
v£) CN <r 



00 in CM 

in ro <r 



\D r-i <y\ 

vo r-. vo 

00 vo r~~ 



vo en in 
r-« in VO 


en 


o 


vO O CO 

vo <r in 
vo ^ in 


en 


CN 

d 



fO 00 iH 

vo r^ r-. 



r^ O - 
CN <f f 



rH iH vO 

<r r^ in 
<r CN en 



:3 3 .-^ 



3D /-^ 



>. >> JC O t 
QJ .-I i-H 4J -H 



jjQQS-uHC/2 cjr-. 5 



(U &0 W) 60 T 



B < < < Qj <: <: 



<UrHrH4->-HcOST3 iH( 



Dcacoonjoco 



(U GOOOOO-H OOOO^ 

a, > > > o > > 
e <d < < <u <: < 



>. t^ ^ O ' 



I S -u E 



(U bO 00 
I CL > > 



> CJ > > 



in 


o 


n 


, 




rsi 


00 


"^ 


m 


vD 


m 


o 




<r 


<r 


00 


v£> 


o 




<r 


vO 


in 


ON 








ON 


00 


vO 




in 


m 


H 




0-) 


^ 


o 


v£) 


o 

o 


^ 


a^ 


"^ 












o 


ON 


LO 


CO 


<r 


•<r 


ro 


in 


CN 



in -H t^ 

r~~ in ^ 

i-H t^ ON 

00 in vx) 

m ON vD 



r^ in vo 



m 00 .-t 
ON o o 



S S >. 



' w Q Q S J-) H w 

M . . . ex • • 
(U 00 M) 60 tH 00 M 
D. > > > O > > 

g <; <; < 01 < <3 



) o 57^ : 



>^ >.x O r 



O CO o c 



M^ X C M 



00 3 m cd o 



OJOOOOOC-HOOOC U 

u > > > u > > 

i <c <: <: (!)<:< 



) Q O S 4-1 H CAl 



L, > > > O > > 



v£) 


en 


o 


vO 


<t 


in 


<r 


vD 


LO 


\0 


<r 


in 



<r o> r 



00 o 
ro en 



O I— I iH 

in ro 00 



• .— I 0^ 00 



in 


en 


<f 


r- 


en 


in 


r^ 


en 


in 


vO 


^ 


in 


in 


^ 


^ 


00 


en 


^ 



r-~ in rH 
^ rH -<r 



- 00 



ey\ 

■<t CO r-A 

00 in r-- 

in o 00 

r^ o CO 

t^ in >£) 

<3- 00 o 



^ <r in 
vC o <^ 



oo 


^ 


r-- 


00 


vD 


r- 


00 


s 




a^ 


r- 


00 


cs 


00* 


o 



O 00 

en vo 



MD 00 r-. 
O 00 0^ 



CM O 



•<r en 
en \o 



>^ >, Jd O rH M-( N-' 



3 Cfl n3 O 



a > > > u > > 

e < < < Qj <d <; 



>^ >^ ^ O r 



0- > > > 



o > ; 
oj <! < 



tJ 


1 


c 


CO 


d 


rt 


•H 


12 


^ 


1 


1 


>, 








o 


o 






cC 


>^ 




■u 


O 


•H 


XI 


m 


n3 


M 


►-1 


0) 






4-1 






C 





^ 






li, 


^ 


^ 


o 


u 


o 


o 


a 


u 


d 


c 


5 


^ 



O to O C O r 



> O P S 4-1 H ( 



CL > > ; 



00 00 ro 
O in 00 



en a\ 



o CO <r 



in r- vo . . 

■<r og t-o CO m 



r-- \£> r-^ <r 

<r c 
<sD r^ r^ 

in CO <r CO c 

cr\ r-^ GO 



1 ^j- 

) r~- <r o 

) v£) 00 

■ • <r 

) r^ <r o 






00 


vO 


r^ 


CO 


o 


CM 


o> 


^ 


<r 




f:: 


S^ 


in 


^ 


o 


o 

00 


<r 


in 


O 


o 


in 


^ 


00 


o 
en 


- 




v£) 


ro 


o 

00 


CO 



o\ m og 



in o CO 



00 




r- 


in 


^^ 


00 


00 


^O 


^ 



<r c^ <r 

in CO <r 

r^ M CM 

in r~^ ^ 

<r cN CO 

Cr> C7^ O 

cNj in <!■ 

<}■ CNj CO 



^'^ >.^ 



mwOOS-uHw 



P< > > > o > > 

e < <: < Qj < < 





,^ 




>i 






^ 


c 




D 


3 


o 


o 


o 




_Cfi 






01 


>. 




u 


H 


^ 






<J- 


J 






§ 


w 


o 


'w 


13 


(U 


U 


5 


n3 


^ 


c 


w 


O 


3 




o 



M -H -H C -U 4-1 O C 

SnJcOOcOOC O 

CC -H 60 

(-!...&•• C 

0) M 00 60 -H 60 bO -H 

CL>>>IJ>> rH 

B < < < <U < < .H 



>. >^ x; O r 



I 60 60 

U > > 



> O > > 



CN in CT\ 0^ 



in 00 

•<f CM 


i 


CO 


o 

CO 


00 


Cvl 


00 


CO 


ON 




r^ vo 


in r- 


C30 00 


CO 
00 


CM 


00 

o 


o> 


v£> 


00 


CO 


d 


ON 




o 

CO o 


CO ^ 


00 


o 




v£5 

o 


in 


00 


CO 




ON 


O 00 


vO 



■in CO o 



CO v£) I 

00 vo r 



CO CO 00 

CO CN eg 

00 vo r- 



in 


CO 

in 


vD 


-H 


in 


00 


\D 


<3- 


in 


VO 


o 


00 


in 


vO 


in 
<)■ 


ON 


v£) 


CO 


v£> 


VO 


r~ 


<r 




CO 


o> 


O 


O 




CN 


VD 



VO <r in CO H 

r-- o ^r ON 

• • • .H CO 

in CO <r . . 

in CO <r <r cN 

<r vo o 00 

. . . CO 00 

00 r^ 00 • • 



in vo iH 
vo in vo 



O ON 
CO (N 



1 VO ON 

'i <t CO 

■ CM CO 



m cNi 

CO o 



00 in 
CO in 



ON 00 



< .H -H C 4-J -U O 

! nj CO o rt O C 
J Q Q S 4-1 H W 



(X > > > O > > 
B < < < <V < < 



3 3 ^ 

e e 

•rj -H C 

>. i^x: o r 



g << <; < 0) <: <: 






d -U W O 1-1 M .H 



o 


o 


<u 


r^ 


u 


0^ 


CXrH 


.r. 


6 


00 


<!• 


vO 


ON 


ON 


-H 



CI, ;> ?> p> cj ?• p» 
B < < < Q) < < 



r~- 00 CO 

vO r-- r^ 
v£) <r in 



O O 
n in 



CM in - 
in o^ r 



O ON 



iH in 00 
v£) CO <r 



>cr in o 
CNl a^ .— t 



CNI o vO 

O rH d 

00 ^ vD 

VO v£) ^ 

v£) r^ 1^ 

00 v£) 1^ 



cN in 



o 


CN 


iH 


in 


CO 


in 


o 


VO 


CO 


VX5 


00 


1-^ 



>-. 


' 




•H 


g 




m 


nJ 




>-i 


pL, 




Q> 




■U 


> 
•H 


X 


§ 


C 


i-i 


o 


1=1 


(1) 




O 


Qi 




J-i 


»i 


QJ 


o 




M 


-n 


'O 


>-i 




J 


O 


1 


B 




M 


CO 




(U 


s 


c 


p. 




•H 


a 




u 


^ 


o 


CM 



► o S S >. -H 






P.VO ■ 

B in • 
<U CJ^ 



CO O (0 O C O 






! <; <: (u <: <: 



-^ iH C CO 

(U rH ,H 4-1 -H CO S 

t-i -H -H c -t-J +-• O 

3 CO CO O to O C 

iJ Q Q l^; 4.) H CO 

CO -H 

U ' • . (X ' . 

(U tiO 00 bO -H C»0 00 

a > > > o > > 

e < < < d) < < 



<f 0^ rsi 

r^ <r vD 

r- in sO 

00 vD r^ 

ro ^ CM 

00 vo r^ 

in oo <!■ 

00 vo r^ 

00 o <r 

rH c^ o 



00 o -d- 

<r o oj 

vo <!■ in 



00 r^ 00 
<t vo in 



sD 00 r^ 
\0 <3- in 



J vo <r sD 



-H on cN 

in ro <!• 

<r 00 o 

00 r-j in 



ON o 

r~~ in 


\D 


CO- 


o 


00 a^ 


CO 
in 


un 


H 


vo in 


CO 


o 


00 


00 vD 


<r 


a^ 


in 


■<r CM 


o- 


^D 


■JD 



CO in 



■-H a^ in 

O CN) i-H 



>s >. J2 O r-{ ^ 



I Q Q S W H en 



e < < < o < < 



>, >.^ O r 



:s "O a\ ^ 



) H CO o . 



Qj too bc ao T 
c a > > > 



oe<:<c<d (u<:<: 



. X C M 



0) rH rH 4-1 -H CO & 
>-i -H -H d -l-i -tJ O 



)-,... a • • 

0) bO 00 00 -H oo oo 

a > > > o > > 
B < < < <i) < < 



-64- 



o r^ <r 

in ro .vT 
vo <r in 



o ON in 
vo <t in 



o 


o 

CM 


^ 


vO 


in 


m 


O 

in 


00 


ON 


fn 


0^ 


vO 


<r 


v£> 


d 






rH O t-H 

00 vo r-- 



<r vD O 

ON -d" r^ 



~ in <o -J- o 



- O ON 
r rH CNI 

~ in vo 



t~- o CTn 

r-- cN <r 

r~- in vD 

O ro vD 



• • • On 00 

CN ^ -3- • • 

in fo <r ro <r 



o 


-J- 








vO 




-d- 


^ 


<r 


<r 


^ 


^ 


in 


o. 




<r 


vO 






■<r 






-3- 


in 


<r 


^. 


00 




^ 


d 


00* 


ON 






<r 


'"' 


OM 


m 


2 


o 


<t 


'"'. 


00 


CNJ 


ON 


CTn 


ON 







>^ >.^ O --H M-l ,-1 r 

.H >H 4-1 -f-l CO & n3 

•H -H C 4-t W O ^ 

CO CO o rt O C S 

Q Q S 4-1 H (/: O 

•H C 

• . . o- • « CO 

0) aooooo-H oooon-' 

'U > > > o > > 

■ <C < < (D < < 



t; 


^^ 




>^ 


o 


i-) 


2: 


C 




3 


en 


O 


<u 


U 


^^ 


>! 


e 




CN 


^ 








00 


CO 


4-1 


XI 


c 


>^ 


o 


o 


S 


CQ 





rH 4-1 -rH CO 5 ' 
•H C 4-1 4-1 O 



1 Q Q S -U H C/2 



> > CJ > > 



Pn CO -H N^ 



OJ bC (50 00 -H 00 00 

a > > > o > > 

e < < <: Qj < <: 



CM ro 00 

>d- <Ti \D 



ro ON vo 



o 


00 


<f 


in 


o 


ro 


d 


00 


ON 



W 13 
U 4-. 

W C 
hJ O 



O .-I ' 
oo' <f . 



§ 


00 


vO 


<!■ 


00 


^ 


i 


vO 


vO 


^O 


o 


m 


oo 


vO 


r^ 



00 ro i-H 



M W 





00 


in 


ro 


r^ 


Ul 


on 


<J- 


•<r 


<N 


O 


r-H 


<J- 


(N 


CM 


CTi 


ON 


ON 






<r 






CO 


m 


o 


^ 


r^ 




in 


00 


ON 


00 







. X C M 



, ?^x: o rH 1+-I 



I Cd -H ^ iH r 

■^ -^ >. ^ -H 



ao ON 

d rH 



CO O cfl 
Q S -iJ 



O C O rH rH 

(U M >.rH >, 



C 4-1 -U O >-l < 

O CO O C O 



6 <: < <d (u <: <3 



iJQQS-i-'HC/^ a CDJ-1 



(U 00 00 Ml T 

a > > > c 
B < < < c 



00 00 c^ 
O^ 00 o> 



r^ iH ON 
o r^ 00 



ON a\ < 
CO vo t 



00 vD t-- 

O CN t— I 

\£> CM -d- 

i-H O ^ 



>H m r-^ 

ON 00 00 



ON CO rH 

r~^ 00 oo' 



<r o 
CO CO 



ON CO 
CO CO 



'^g 



!-i -H -H C . 



(-1 • 

ex > 



> > u > > 



£<:<:<! <u <; <; 



■H in fo 

<!■ vo in 

in fo <J- 

r^ o o^ 

•<r CO CO 

o o in 

vO iH 00 

<r CO CO 



>. >. jn O r 



(1) OC 60 { 

Pu > > ; 

E <1 < < 



OcsirHi — oo^vDcxDr-~v^r^cNi<j-o>vr>aN cnc7>(— imoooc 



^vomm <rr~~vooooooo<N<romoov^ r^o>^<ra>o^ 



-~3--^<fcsiLnvDr~~vCvo ^cNt— icMc^i— ic 



vcr^iHoo I^moolnoa^vDo^ooo<J■( 



HOO<Dog^oor^roOrH(Tvc 



in 00 00 CTi 



■ c^ a> o r^ o I 






mocr>~* <rc3^OCT^^0^^Or^00OL^O^^0 rOLTiOiO' 



r~-ONroLn f^mvorsifn-vrvOLOOcMONvDLri oc 



^OO^o^l v£)<j-roCT\r^r^<j->Hr^cNr^rO(N inoov£)infn<ro 



mr^oooovooooocNiooN-<i-vo<r oa^mfoo^voo 



vCfOiHcN Lnoooc^r^^oooo<to>0'— iin o-<fr^<^00iHO 



^cNON^in^riHoocNini— ifo cNir^m<rf^r^cr> 



-co<Tv<rooa\oOiHcrir^r^r^Ln cNt 



1 vo ro o> CN O 



Ni— iCNjoOva-invor-^oocTiOrHrsi o^I— icNic^^mo 



<r f^ v£) vo ~ 



icNOOvor-^-j- -d-f^t— If 



)oovooNOO<rcr>in vo m 

liH.-! OJOslrHrHCM >H <r 



uoo cTiOfor^oo Oinor^-ooONOrocN^ooOc 






>-H<^ -J-LOVOOOCNJ^ O^CNlLOr 



^ rH o o 



■ o^m^cNIt— iLncr>f^ oo 



oSo Lno<roNCNoo 



1OvOOO<tOCN00^^^a^ 00 OJ 



ivo r--rsii— ir-cMCNr-~-a\oOi— iinooin m 



>H o 
o in 


CO 




1h 


<r 


<f 


^ 


^S 


•~- 


00 


"^ 


^ 


o 


^ 


g§ 


rH 


ON 


00 


00 


o 


eg 



inc^iHooinm^rCTNOomCTNvo 



a^ r^ o 00 ^D r 



oco LoinLOLniOLn 

(UO r-~00O^Or-ICN| 



- 00 0^ O iH CN 0> CTi 



rt 




^ 


c 


4J 


CO 








_o 


CO 




OJ 




m 






en 


^ 


c 


(1) 




CO 






o 


3 


CO 




>-i 










>-( 


(U 


W) 


•u 




W 


0) 


^ 


c 


rt 






^ 








o 






CO 




on 


a 


<u 


to 


(U 


c 






x; 


d) 


:s 


0) 


»-i 


•H 




s 




CO 


(1) 


<d 


CO 




rt 


0) 


x: 




QJ 


<u 





en 


>^ 


4-1 -H 


(U 


> 


C 


XJ 


CO ao Q 




o 


•H 


2 ^ 






•H 


CJ 






CO 






C > 


c 


^ 


CO 


OJ 


O 


o 


:2 




u 








cn 


o 


(50 ^ 


bo 






B 


C .H 


c 


CO 


w 


•H 


•H O 


•H 


c 


QJ 


4-) 


X: «4-l 


6 


•H 


^ 




CO M 




^ 




CO 


CO O 


•H 




CO 


CQ 


:s s 


13 


w 



NATURAL RESOURCES 

Maryland's 2,960,000 acres of forest land represent nearly 47 per cent 
of the total land area of the State. As one might expect, however, there is 
considerable variance among the political subdivisions. The vast majority of 
commercial forest land is held in private lands (approximatel6 9 3.4 per cent) 
while public ownership accounts for the remainder. 

Over 80 per cent of the timber in Maryland is of the hardwood varieties, 
and an estimated 183.6 million board feet of lumber were cut during the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1975. Forest fires are always a threat, and in the 1976 
fiscal year, 908 such blazes burned a total area of 3,555 acres. All counties 
suffered from these fires, and the causes were primarily carelessness in 
nature. 

Nearly $173 million worth of minerals were extracted during 1974. The 
leading commodities were bituminous coal and stone, accounting for 28.1 per cent 
and 27.6 per cent, respectively, of the total. Sand and gravel were next as 
these items accounted for another 17 per cent of the value extracted. Major 
producing areas were Baltimore, Frederick, Prince George's, Garrett, and 
Carroll Counties. 

Maryland touches both the Atlantic Ocean and the Chesapeake Bay. Seafood, 
therefore, becomes a vital resource. As impressive as the data reported herein 
appears to be, the user must be cautioned that there is a substantial under- 
count, what with the large number of sport fishermen active in our waters. 

Data indicate a Maryland catch in 1976 with a dockside value of nearly 
$31.3 million. The major share of this catch is credited to shellfish which 
account for almost $29 million of the total. Oysters led that year (over $16.4 
million), clams (approximately $6.6 million), and crabs (fnore than $5.6 million). 
Leading finfish catches by value were striped bass (rockfish), bluefin tuna, 
and flounder. 

-70- 



COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND AREA BY STAND-SIZE CLASS 
IN MARYLAND AND NEIGHBORING STATES 
AND THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES: 1970 



STAND-SIZE 
CLASS 



UNITED PENNSYL- WEST 

STATES MARYLAND VANIA DELAWARE VIRGINIA VIRGINIA 



Total 1,000 Acres 


499,697 


2,882 


17,478 


Per cent of U.S. Total 


100.00 


0.58 


3.50 


Sawtimber 


215,867 


1,791 


7,665 


1,000 Acres 








Pole timber 


126,693 


753 


6,081 


1,000 Acres 








Seedling & Sapling 


131,368 


297 


3,399 


1,000 Acres 








Not Stocked 


20,721 


40 


333 


1,000 Acres 









390 15,859 12,092 

0.08 3.17 2,42 

210 5,308 5,951 

128 5,981 3,297 

45 4,472 2,596 

6 96 248 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, The Outlook for Timber in the United States , pp. 231-232, 
July 1974. 

NO. 37 
FOREST LAND AREA IN MARYLAND AND NEIGHBORING STATES 
AND THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES: 1970 





UNITED 




PENNSYL- 






WEST 




STATES 


MARYLAND 


VANIA 


DELAWARE 


VIRGINIA 


VIRGINIA 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


TYPE 


ACRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


ACRES 


Total Land Area 


2,270,050 


6,369 


28,816 


1,268 


25,496 


15,413 


Forest Land Area 


753,549 


2,960 


17,832 


391 


16,389 


12,172 


% of all forest land 


33.2 


46.5 


61.9 


30.8 


64.3 


79.0 


Commercial Forest Land 


499,697 


2,882 


17,478 


390 


15,859 


12,092 


% of all forest land 


66.3 


97.4 


98.0 


99.7 


96.8 


99.3 


Non-Commercial Forest 


253,852 


78 


354 


1 


530 


80 


Land 














% of all forest land 


33.7 


2.6 


2.0 


0.3 


3.2 


0.7 


Reserved forest land 


17,246 


35 


194 


1 


313 


46 


Source: U.S. Forest Service, The Outl 


ook for Timber in the 


U.S., July 


1974. 





CO W 

Pi X 

W H 



M (U 


o m 0) 


O U] OJ 


o w oj 


o 


CO CU 


(U CJ) 


O (U o 


O 0) u 


o cu o 


o 


cu u 



r-{ <C 0) r-i <C d) iH<;(U 



r-. 00 


OO --H CO LO Ol 




m ^ 00 vr> <t 


^ <t 


in in c3^ ^ LO 



rH vO . 00 00 



Q CO 

< H 



^ 0> O 00 



o M 



J O O vO 1 

^ o r-- Lo c 



ON in 00 ^r r-- r 

csi <r m o 00 r 

CN LJ-l 00 o O L 



tH vD <r rH 



O 2 CO 

Cci kJ H 



Q H S 
< O kJ 



H < 2 

CO :Z) M 

o ■z ■z 

2; < o 



hJ CO 
O Pi 

> w 



o 


v£) 


in 


(Tv 


o 


o-i 


CM 


00 


.— 1 .— I 


o 


in 


in CO c^ 




OS 




cr. 


r^ 


CM 


vD 




00 00 






o in M 






00 


<r 








O 


Csl vX) 




CO 


vO o O 








>^ 


v£) 


a^ 


vD 




rH in 






vO 00 CO 








o 




00 












^ <r 
























rsi 








r^ 


•<f 


CO 


^O 


O 


o^ r-~- 


^ 


r^ 


^ m ctn 






<r 




in 


a^ 


vO 


O 




00 




O C^J CO 






o 


^ 


00 


r^ 


r~- 




CM <r 




O 






rH 


<j- 










d 


















vO 


o 


O 


o 








^ o> ^ 




00 




^ 


vO 


o 






O M 




vD 


CO I— 1 in 


r— 1 




^ 


in 


o 




<!• 




o^ in 


o 




rH CTN CM 








00 


o~ 


r^ 


CN 




.H 


t— 1 




-H o^ O 



coc:ooj::m(ucoc;5 

a)ooma»-u>c-U' 
aoo s s j-ixi co-H<;u-i 

•H S-iM-l J-J CP^COPl-i-UCO: 
S 0) O CO s OJ 

O P-i c/2 X o z 







rn 


C/l 


o. 


^ 








Ti 






cfl 




>-l 


C 


O 


o 


x: 




CU 


(1) 


0) 


o 


o 


(/) 


01 




XI 


(.J 


:5 


15 


j-i 


T3 


en 


Fi 






XI 


QJ 


tl) 






>-i 










en 




0) 


n 








5 


(1^ 




X 


O 







OJ CO O O 



CL, 4-) CO ffi 



-73- 



NET VOLUME OF LIVE SAWTIMBER IN SAWTIMBER STANDS 

ON COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND IN MARYLAND AND NEIGHBORING STATES 

AND THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES: 1970 



STAND-SIZE 
CLASS 



WEST 
UNITED STATES MARYLAND PENNSYLVANIA DELAWARE VIRGINIA VIRGINIA 



Sawtimber Million 


2,420,766 


6,962 


29,616 


Bd. Ft. 










Per Cent 


of U.S. 


100.00 


0.29 


1.22 


Total 










Softwood 




1,905,289 


1,281 


3,434 


Per Cent 


of U.S. 


100.00 


0.07 


0-18 


Total 










Hardwood 




515,477 


5,681 


26,182 


Per Cent 


of U.S. 


100.00 


1.10 


5.08 


Total 











1,361 39,227 35,686 

0.06 1.62 1.47 

460 11,885 1,836 

0.02 0.62 0.10 

901 27,343 33,850 

0.17 5.30 6.57 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, The Outlook for Timber in the United States , July 1974. 



NET VOLUME OF SAWTIMBER ON COMMERCIAL TIMBERLAND IN MARYLAND, 
SPECIES AS OF JANUARY 1, 1970 



SAWTIMBER 
MILLION BD. FT. 



GROWING STOCK 
MILLION CU. FT. 



Total Softwoods 

Shortleaf & Loblolly Pine 
Other Yellow Pine 
Eastern Hemlock 
Other Eastern Softwoods 



1,281 Eastern Softwoods, Total 531 

798 Shortleaf & Loblolly Pines 308 

432 Other Yellow Pines 192 

21 Eastern Hemlock 20 

30 Other Eastern Softwoods 11 



Total Hardwoods 
Select White Oaks 
Select Red Oaks 
Other White Oaks 
Other Red Oaks 
Hickory 
Hard Maple 
Soft Maple 
Beech 
Sweetgum 

Tupelo and Blackgum 
Ash 

Cottonwood and Aspen 
Yellow Poplar 
Black Walnut 
Other Eastern Hardwoods 



5,681 Eastern Hardwoods, Total 12,543 

755 Select White Oaks 341 

508 Select Red Oaks 191 

391 Other White Oaks 200 

1,008 Other Red Oaks 435 

240 Hickory 109 

21 Hard Maple 21 

132 Soft Maple 148 

173 Beech 75 

461 Sweetgum 229 

236 Tupelo and Blackgum 112 

72 Ash 56 

12 Cottonwood and Aspen 17 

1,319 Yellow Poplar 407 

59 Black Walnut 27 

294 Other 175 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, The Outlook for Timber in the United States , July 1974, 
Appendix I, Table 17, Table 19. 



ANNUAL CUT AND NET ANNUAL GROWTH OF GROWING STOCK ON 
COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND, MARYLAND, BY SPECIES GROUP: 1970 



ANNUAL CUT NET GROWTH 

CUBIC FEET CUBIC FEET 

SPECIES GROUP (1,000) (1,000) 

All Species 75,572 106,499 

Softwoods 30,774 16,576 

Hardwoods 44,798 89,923 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, Outlook for Timber in the United States , July 1974, 
Table 25. 



NO. 43 



ANNUAL CUT AND NET ANNUAL GROWTH OF LIVE SAWTIMBER ON 
COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND, MARYLAND, BY SPECIES GROUP: 1970 



ANNUAL CUT NET GROWTH 

BOARD FEET BOARD FEET 

SPECIES GROUP (1,000) (1,000) 



All Species 320,585 268,053 

Softwoods 126,837 43,0l9 

Hardwoods 193,748 225,034 



Source: U.S. Forest Service, Outlook for Timber in the United States , July 1974, 
Table 26. 



H W 
CO o 

o w 



J O I IOC 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 



o o o o 






o o o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 



- rH v^ O O 



J CO CT\ I 0\ 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 



O O O I 



O O O O O I 



o o o o 



o o o o 



o o o o o o 



o o o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 



H \0 0^ r-~ C30 00 o 



O .H r^ V 



5 ^ 00 r^ 00 c 



1 00 O vO O 



J00O>3-O OOO^TL 



M <; piH O 12 



4-1 C CO 42 O O ^J -I 
3 -5 U U SC S P-i c 



3 CO H :s :s 



^ 2^ 



4-1 cfl cd 0) CO (U 3 I 

CpQUOKI^CD' -Ut 



NO. 45 

NUMBER OF FOREST FIRES AND AREA BURNED ^^^ IN MARYLAND, 
BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: YEARS 1976 AND 1974 





NLT^ffiER OF 


AREA BURNED 


NUMBER OF 


AREA BURNED 


POLITICAL 


FIRES 


1976 


FIRES 


1974 


SUBDIVISION 


1976 


(ACRES) 


1974 


(ACRES) 


MARYLAND 


908 


3,555 


823 


2,271 


REGION I Western 


140 


753 


111 


214 


Allegany 


36 


356 


28 


136 


Frederick 


46 


87 


49 


28 


Garrett 


37 


193 


18 


25 


Washington 


21 


117 


16 


25 


REGION II Southern 


220 


541 


225 


1,195 


Anne Arundel 


36 


162 


55 


884 


Calvert 


11 


7 


7 


19 


Charles 


44 


58 


33 


40 


Howard 


26 


44 


22 


41 


Montgomery 


21 


62 


41 


62 


Prince George's 


35 


168 


56 


82 


St. Mary's 


47 


40 


11 


67 


REGION III Eastern 


219 


1,970 


244 


630 


Caroline 


36 


26 


29 


14 


Dorchester 


56 


1,085 


35 


114 


Somerset 


37 


767 


55 


215 


Talbot 


30 


15 


46 


22 


Wicomico 


47 


48 


56 


181 


Worcester 


13 


29 


23 


84 


REGION IV Central 


329 


291 


243 


232 


Baltimore 


137 


103 


120 


65 


Carroll 


28 


33 


12 


14 


Cecil 


57 


70 


44 


99 


Harford 


82 


52 


49 


33 


Kent 


3 


1 


5 


7 


Queen Anne's 


22 


32 


13 


14 



Woodland endangered not included. 

Source: State of Maryland, Fall Forest Fire Report , 1974 and 1976. 

State of Maryland, Spring Forest Fire Report , 1974 and 1976. 



-78- 



CT^ o n .H O r 



J O 00 O vO 



-jvOrHin^d-foroo <rfnmin<r^iH 



•J vO O m iH vO 



1 0^ VO CM vO 



■) O 00 r~ vO <M o 



00 m CM o iH 



^ iH O rH r 



J O iH -* rH vD r 



m m m vo CO iH m 



o H ^^_ 






O VD iH <!■ ^D r 



rH CO in CO ro <r r 



H > 
M M 

o pa 



^ § 


T3 >% O CD 

tug Sc5V 

M 4J CO 6 u 




>^ CJ 4-1 


M <U 4J 4-t 


C -ri 4-1 60 


C CD 0) 


Ic ^1 w C 


O OJ >H >J 60 CJ S 


S -rH 0) CD 


60 0) 0) -H 


O -H J= V4 


<u -^ U J^ 


M (U > )-i rt w C 


M O CJ 0) 


,H (U t-i to 


O C --< nj & C -H • 


O M >-. s 


H >-< ^ ^ 


§^c36^^^i^ 


W Cti O O 


<i fn o & 


Oi CJ Q W 



i w o u pa fc^ o- 



NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN AND GEAR IN MARYLAND: 
1974, 1972 AND 1970 



1974 



Total Fishermen 15,563 13,381 11,668 

Vessels - Motor 993 866 721 

Vessels - Sail 29 35 39 

Boats 11,366 8,986 8,856 

Haul Seines 69 88 9 7 

Gill Nets: Anchor, Stake or Set 2,813 2,978 1,961 

Drift Gill Nets 331 332 393 

Hand Lines 158 75 424 

Crab Trot Lines 9,272 7,984 5,583 

Fount Nets 234 194 219 

Fyke and Hoop Nets 1,356 1,218 306 

Dip Nets 150 155 110 

Crab Pots 109,650 94,795 86,160 

Eel Traps 10,150 9,750 9,386 

Fish Pots 4,817 2,607 2,309 

Conch Traps 150 

Lobster Pots 1,300 500 

Turtle Pots 130 80 75 

Scrapes 280 315 86 

Clam Dredges 263 183 277 

Crab Dredges _ _ - 

Oyster Dredges 79 132 122 

Oyster Tongs 4,452 3,798 4,263 

Other Tongs - 2 61 

Takes 7 6- 

Otter Trawls 15 10 25 

Source: Department of Commerce, National Marine Fisheries Services, Chesapeake 

Fisheries , Annual Summary 1974; Fishery Statistics of the United States , 
1972, 1970. 



NO. 48 
FISH CATCH IN MARYLAND, BY QUANTITY: 1974, 1975 AND 1976 



19 74 
(1,000 POUNDS) 



1975* 
(1,000 POUNDS) 



Total, All Species 

Finfish 
Alewives 
Bluefish 
Butterfish 
Carp 

Catfish and Bullheads 
Cod 

Crappie 
Croaker 
Drum, Black 
Eels, Common 
Flounder 
Gizzard Shad 
Hake, Red 
Herring, Sea 
Hickory Shad 
Mackerel, Boston 
Menhaden 
Scup (Porgy) 
Sea Bass 
Sea Trout 
Shad 
Sharks 
Spot 

Striped Bass 
Sturgeon 
Sun fish 
Tuna, Bluefin 
White Perch 
Whiting 
Yellow Perch 
Unclassified : 
Unclassified: 
Animal Food 
Other Species 



For Food 
For Bait, 



Reduction and 



66,844 

14,217 

1,388 

553 

13 

106 

279 

6 

1 

121 

2 

145 

710 

118 

10 

34 

12 

68 

5,516 

3 

237 

410 

221 

129 

37 

3,495 

5 

3 

510 
21 
36 

5 
2 

20 



L4,975 


13,626 


696 


122 


2 72 


489 


22 


21 


114 


93 


260 


230 


15 


9 


2 


1 


639 


1,072 


27 


6 


205 


166 


893 


693 


94 


47 


5 


4 


31 


6 


12 


6 


205 


224 


6,229 


6,106 


171 


35 


349 


296 


893 


429 


182 


111 


175 


80 


90 


15 


2,764 


1,814 


5 


2 


4 


2 


- 


1,098 


569 


408 


5 


7 


30 


23 


4 


6 


3 


0.3 



(continued on following page) 



-81- 



NO. 48 
FISH CATCH IN MARYLAND, BY QUANTITY: 1974, 1975 AND 1976 (Cont'd.) 



1974 
(1,000 POUIIDS) 



1975'"= 
(1,000 POUNDS) 



1976* 
(1,000 POUNDS) 



Shellfish 

Crabs, Blue 

Hard 

Soft and Peeler 
Lobsters 
Clam Meats 

Hard 

Soft 

Surf 
Oyster Meats, Market 
Other Species (2) 



52,627 

26,483 

24,662 

1,821 

37 

7,594 

69 

2,099 

5,426 

18,284 

228 



49,280 

25,918 

24,264 

1,654 

59 

6,671 

74 

1,246 

5,351 

16,402 

2 30 



45,875 

20,886 

19,413 

1,473 

117 

8,907 

29 

1,743 

7,135 

15,828 

138 



^Preliminary. 

Note: In addition 2,356,478 bushels of oysters were landed in 1976. A Maryland Oyster 
Bushel contains 2,800.7 cubic inches. 



^^ Include Hogchoker, King Whiting, Mullet, Red Drum, Spanish I-Iackerel, Suckers, and 
Tautog. 

(2) Include Conch Meats, Ocean Quahogs, Sea Scallops, Squid, Diamond-Back Terrapin, 
and Snapper Turtles. 

Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, National Marine Fisheries Service, in cooperation 
with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Maryland Landings , Annual 
Summary 1974, and December 1976 issue. 



NO. 49 
FISH CATCH IN MARYLAND, BY VALUE: 1974, 1975 AND 1976 



Total, All Species 

Finfish 
Alewives 
Bluefish 
Butterfish 
Carp 

Catfish and Bullheads 
Cod 

Crappie 
Croaker 
Drum, Black 
Eels , Common 
Flounder 
Gizzard Shad 
Hake, Red 
Herring, Sea 
Hickory Shad 
Mackerel, Atlantic 
Menhaden 
Scup (Porgy) 
Sea Bass 
Sea Trout 
Shad 
Sharks 
Spot 

Striped Bass 
Sturgeon 
Sunf ish 
Tuna, Bluefin 
White Perch 
Whiting 
Yellow Perch 
Unclassified: For Food 
Unclassified: For Bait, 

Animal Food 
Other Species 



Reduction and 



1974 


1975* 


1976* 


($) 


($) 


($) 


22,380,791 


22,844,710 


31,288,039 


1,698,213 


2,152,095 


2,312,747 


31,825 


16,075 


5,320 


44,604 


25,671 


28,589 


3,128 


4,880 


5,544 


2,625 


2,347 


2,452 


34,411 


30,485 


28,409 


1,438 


4,611 


2,874 


320 


449 


349 


18,505 


52,838 


117,557 


205 


1,933 


451 


42,952 


69,725 


58,004 


160,070 


268,789 


235,749 


1,284 


963 


542 


567 


213 


135 


756 


1,211 


130 


1,304 


1,623 


1,435 


9,611 


33,290 


20,743 


144,348 


166,003 


192,607 


660 


36,004 


6,990 


66,543 


89,212 


84,785 


54,277 


79,414 


46,283 


45,693 


44,606 


42,028 


6,555 


8,826 


4,457 


5,415 


8,314 


2,838 


916,287 


1,083,710 


990,863 


607 


1,073 


518 


260 


372 


221 


- 


- 


318,411 


94,930 


112,049 


107,046 


1,769 


689 


1,068 


5,279 


5,323 


4,973 


592 


372 


878 


37 


69 


7 



.(1) 



(continued on following page) 



-83- 



NO. 49 
FISH CATCH IN MARYLAND, BY VALUE: 1974, 1975 AND 1976 (Cont'd.) 



f 



1974 


1975* 


1976* 


($) 


($) 


($) 


20,682,578 


20,692,615 


28,975,292 


5,085,165 


5,149,768 


5,649,968 


4,054,663 


4,281,252 


4,575,475 


1,030,502 


868,516 


1,074,493 


65,408 


106,312 


230,395 


2,762,465 


2,241,525 


6,624,722 


44,390 


56,558 


27,591 


1,797,000 


1,174,340 


2,767,698 


939,075 


1,010,627 


3,829,433 


12,707,575 


13,126,666 


16,428,117 


61,965 


68,344 


42,090 



Shellfish 

Crabs, Blue 

Hard 

Soft and Peeler 
Lobsters 
Clam Meats 

Hard 

Soft 

Surf 
Oyster Meats, Market 
Other Species^ 



s(2) 



*Preliminary . 



(1) 



Include Hogchoker, King Whiting, Mullet, Red Drum, Spanish Mackerel, Suckers, and 



(2) Include Conch Meats, Ocean Quahogs, Sea Scallops, Squid, Diamond-Back Terrapin, 
and Snapper Turtles. 

Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, National Marine Fisheries Service, in cooperation 
with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Maryland Landings , Annual 
Summary 1974, and December 1976 issue. 



NO. 50 
SEAFOOD PROCESSED PRODUCTS, MARYLAND: 1975, 1974, AND 1970 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1974/1975 1970/1975 



Value (In thousands) 

Wholesale and 
Manufacturing 

Number of Establishments 

Persons Employed 

Average Per Season^ ■' 

Average Per Year 



$97,723 $83,344 $58,206 



4,264 


4,215 


4,812 


1.2 


-11.4 


3,395 


3,346 


3,790 


1.5 


-10.4 



^^ Derived from dividing the number of employees reported by the number of months of 
operation. 

Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, National Marine Fisheries Service, Processed 
Fishery Products, Annual Summary 1975 ; Chesapeake Fisheries, Annual 
1974; Fishery Statistics of the United States 1970 . 



HUNTING AND FISHING LICENSE SALES, MARYLAND: FISCAL 
YEARS 1973-1976 



TYPE OF LICENSE 1976 1975 197A 1973 

Hunting 256,810 283,087 276,680 266,612 



Statewide 


141,801 


150,594 


148,225 


146,083 


Junior Statewide 


18,434 


23,234 


23,520 


22,902 


Non-resident 


13,871 


12,259 


10,684 


10,168 


Regulated Shooting Area 


333 


322 


292 


353 


Duck Blind 


2,708 


3,274 


3,192 


3,305 


Pusher 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Sneak Boat 


Included 


in Duck Blind 


145 


148 


Deer - Turkey Stamps 


79,663 


93,404 


90,621 


83,652 



Fishing 

Total of All Types 

Resident Statewide 

Non-resident 

Seven Day Tourist 

Potomac River^-*-) 

Trout Stamps 24,723 22,608 24,563 24,710 

Cl)Virginia, West Virginia, and Potomac grouped together. 

Source: State of Maryland, Department of Natural Resources, Licensing Division. 



139,990 


141,837 


157,287 


145,949 


106,334 


109,843 


122,831 


112,344 


5,141 


5,574 


5,729 


5,256 


3,544 


3.716 


3,960 


3,230 


248 


96 


204 


409 



^^ 














o 


.H 




o 








w o 


O 




o 






^ 


» o 


in 








•H 


0^ 


u-T 




in 




CvT 


00 


> z> 














^ 


.H 












M 


^ 




^ 




o 


O 


H 














^ 










^ 


^ 


S 














o- 




























o 












<r 


g§ 


O 




o 






<r 






t"^ 




CT^ 


vO 


rH 




VO 




^ 


en 


> <«- 






o> 






















g 


X 




^ 






<T> 




X 






a^ 


00 


H 










c» 




^ 












^ 


P 














o- 


a- 


























o 


o 








vD 


o 


m o 


c» 




r^ 




v£) 




P o 


CX3 




^o 




O 


VO 


hJ « 














<: rH 












00 


> <2; 


r^ 




00 






<■ 




■to- 












g 


^ 




^ 




00 


Pi 












00 




^ 












e>r 


^ 














o- 










c 
o 


•u 
u 

1 




C 




C 


m 




o 




o 




o 






o 








•H 


CO 




o 




4-1 




J-) 




o 










O 










3 




3 


o 








-o 




T3 


Q 








o 




O 




o 




H 






U 




o 


CO 




PL. 


;ij 


fu 


C 
CO 


o 


o 


§ W 


.-H 


o 




iJ 






Pi 


n) 


Q 


cd 








II 








c 




3 


a) 




0) 


o 




o 


c 


c 


c 


u 




c 


hJ ^ 


s 


(U 


g 


f^ 


CD 


e 


« p^ 




^1 




vO 


?-. 


3 


-H 


3 




<T> 


CO 


4-) 


w o 


CO 


u 


CO 














4J 




u 


pa 


M 


O 




o 








s 


H 




H 









;^ ^ 



?^ ^ 



T3 O 4J 



w > 



^2 

H > 
O pq 



CMC 
O cfl 

■U T3 m 



C >-i 



e o c c e 



r- O vD 00 0^ S .-I r 



cd C O to O 
O cfl w ,H -UJ 
O c/D w U en 



S^OS00O^ 5S;S.h:3 



rH CD CO 1 

<-{ 0) Q) i 

O >H .H j: ' 



U U CJ Q pL< 



CO rt o <u o 



C5 >, J-) O CU 
J-i 60 CJ J-) 

0) eg c -d CO 



PL, C/i 13 IS IS 



LABOR FORCE, EMPLOYMENT, AND UNEMPLOYMENT 

More than 1.7 million Maryland residents were employed in 1976 as both 
the civilian labor force and the working members of that labor force continued 
to grow. On an average basis, the unemployment rate of 6.8 per cent in 
Maryland for 1976, reflecting the nationwide recession, was slightly down from 
6.9 per cent for 19 75, but still considerably higher than the unemployment rate 
for 197A (4.7 per cent). 

Annual average employment figures in Maryland for 1976 indicate gains over 
1975 in all sectors with the exceptions of transportation and utilities, and 
federal government employment. Those major areas of employment hardest hit 
by losses during the 1974 - 1975 period were manufacturing, contract construction, 
transportation and utilities, and finance, insurance and real estate. From 
1975 to 1976, the larger gains were reported in the non-manufacturing sectors, 
contract construction (3.1 per cent), services (2.9 per cent), and state and 
local government 2.7 per cent). 

The role of federal government civilian employment in Maryland should not 
be overlooked. More than 131,000 Marylanders were employed by various federal 
agencies at the end of 1975 and this figure places Maryland third among all of 
the jurisdictions of the Nation in terms of resident population in relation to 
federal emplo3nnent. An additional 49,156 civilian and military employees work 
for the Department of Defense. 

Included in this section are tables showing commutation patterns of workers. 
Both interstate and intrastate destinations are shown. It is interesting to 
note that nearly 40 per cent of our labor force works outside its subdivision 
of residence. 



Labor relations have continued good in Maryland. In conformity with 
historical trends, the per cent of estimated work time lost by stoppages in 
Maryland was again lower than corresponding national figures. 



CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE, TOTAL EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT 
IN MARYLAND BY REGION AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1976 
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE 





POPULATION ' 


CIVILIAN 


LABOR FORCE 


TOTAL 










AS PER CENT 






PROJECTION 




OF 


EMPLOY- 


UNEMPLOYMENT 




(JULY 1) 


NUMBER 


POPULATION 


MENT 


NUMBER 


RATE 


MARYLAND 


4,153,900 


L, 900, 000 


45.7 


1,772,000 


128,000 


6.8 


Western Maryland 














Allegany 


82,300 


32,228 


39.2 


28,665 


3,563 


11.1 


Garrett 


24,600 


10,174 


41.4 


9,138 


1,036 


10.2 


Washington 


109,600 


47,819 


43.6 


43,321 


4,498 


9.4 


Frederick 


98,800 


40,157 


40.6 


37,700 


2,457 


6.1 


Baltimore SMSA 


2,153,900 


964,000 


44.8 


888,000 


76,000 


7.9 


Anne Arundel 


351,100 


147,441 


42.0 


137,478 


9,963 


6.8 


Baltimore City 


832,500 


338,000 


40.6 


303,000 


35,000 


10.3 


Baltimore 


642,400 


353,915 


55.1 


331,118 


22,79 7 


6.4 


Carroll 


83,600 


37,274 


44.6 


35,101 


2,173 


5.8 


Harford 


139,300 


55,447 


39.8 


50,896 


4,551 


8.2 


Howard 


105,000 


31,938 


30.4 


30,421 


1,517 


4.7 


Washington SMSA 














Charles 


62,600 


21,220 


33.9 


20,050 


1,170 


5.5 


Montgomery 


580,900 


280,526 


48.3 


270,149 


10,377 


3.7 


Prince George's 


681,600 


352,874 


51.8 


337,740 


15,134 


4.3 


Southern Maryland 














Calvert 


28,100 


12,058 


42.9 


10,973 


1,085 


9.0 


St. Mary's 


52,600 


14,960 


28.4 


13,781 


1,179 


7.9 


Eastern Shore 














Cecil 


56,400 


21,585 


38.3 


19,980 


1,605 


7.4 


Kent 


16,700 


7,801 


46.7 


6,851 


950 


12.2 


Queen Anne ' s 


20,800 


8,476 


40.8 


7,697 


779 


9.2 


Caroline 


21,900 


7,695 


35.1 


6,956 


739 


9.6 


Talbot 


25,900 


13,659 


52.7 


13,072 


587 


4.3 


Dorchester 


29,900 


15,347 


51.3 


14,225 


1,122 


7.3 


Wicomico 


60,000 


27,039 


45.1 


24,533 


2,506 


9.3 


Worcester 


27,600 


13,370 


48.4 


12,036 


1,334 


10.0 


Somerset 


19,700 


9,011 


45.7 


7,132 


1,879 


20.9 


Source: Maryland 


Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 


Maryland 


Center for Health 


Statistics, Itoryland Population Estimates, July ] 


., 1975 and 


Projections 


to 1981, 



issued June, 1977. 

Maryland Department of Human Resources, Research and Analysis Division. 



^ Pil C3^ 13 



O Q >• 



^3 






<ru-^o^o^oocNa^r 



csi o r^ 



O <r cN en O r 

ON O r- CM o r 



in o vo iH 

CO <r f^ o 



N ON -H oo o o <r 
^ in t^ o cN CM o 



- 1— I 00 <r ON o f^ o 
1 ON .H in o cNj r^ o 



r-~or^\£>r^ONCO<roNOO 


vO ON >H 


OvO^TiHiHOOOfOi— ION 

fOcNOm ONf^r^oor^ 


ON CO CN 



r-- CO c 
00 CO r 



T3 


^ 




C 


.;^ 


!-i 


(1) 


tn 


^ 


TD 


<i) 


O (U 


3 




o 






TJ 


C 


CO 


d 


> 


O .H 






a 


01 




CO 


•iH 




CO 


o 


GO XI 


C) 








0) 






tfl 




w 


m 


m 




w 


u 


rH 






CU 


CO 




CU !-i 






o 


o 


CO 




dJ 




<u 




rH 3 


3 


w: 


CO 


Cu 


en 


rH 


(J 


rH 


a 


CO 


X T3 


r: 


C 






0) 




C 


CO 






cfl 1 


S 


•H 


4-1 


C 




CO 


^ 


QJ 


> 


<D 



C O 2 c S U H ! 



q; qj ■ 



■ <r CT> ^ r^ ^ 
> I— I vD o <r f^ 



r-4 d r 



W 0^ 



CX3 cNi a> u~i 00 r^ 

0^ CM in CN o o 



1 0> .-H 0^ 00 

1 ^ <r o o 



W 0^ 



OOrHiH-crcO ,-( rOOr 



00 00 ON 
CM O CN 






rH <r r-- <r o in r^ 



^ < hJ 
B S9 P^ 
<; w >H 
pq 
w w 

^ s 



un o 
r-- o 
a\ o 



00 0> CTn ^ 


ON in 


CO 


CO 00 vo in 


00 ON 00 


rH ON <r CJN 
vD vO vD (~^ 


<r CM 


J^ 


vO ON Csl 00 

-cr <r <r 


<f •<)■ rH 



^ o 
r- o 
On O 



^O O ^ CO vD C 



vD O -vT 00 



t-l O vC 

ON in in 



00 O OJ 3 O • 



•H -u CO >-i <u m . 



CO -ra 'H a . 



ao 43 CJ JJ CQ 

COCO-US^OSPJ'O.H- 



3 3 CO &,r- 



o ^ T3 C )-i en • 



■UCCOMOrHiHCfl 



c n Z d O H 



PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF NONAGRICULTURAL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT 
IN MARYLAND: 1974, 1975, AND 1976 
BY PLACE OF WORK 



TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT 



1974 



NONAGRICULTURAL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT 



100.0% 



Manuf act uring 
Durable goods 
Non-durable goods 

Nonmanufact uring 
Mining 

Contract construction 
Transportation and utilities 
Wholesale trade 
Retail trade 

Finance, insurance and real estate 
Services and miscellaneous 
Federal government 
State and local government 



15.4 


15.6 


17.0 


8.4 


8.5 


9.4 


7.0 


7.1 


7.6 


84.6 


84.4 


83.0 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


6.2 


6.1 


7.1 


5.2 


5.3 


5.4 


5.0 


5.0 


4.8 


19.0 


19.0 


18.6 


5.3 


5.4 


5.4 


19.1 


18.9 


18.2 


8.9 


9.0 


8.9 


15.8 


15.6 


14.5 



Totals may not add due to rounding. 



Sources: Maryland Department of Human Resources, Research and Analysis Division, 
Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Employment . 



hJ Q O 

<3 z :2 
CO <: 



o ^ pa 



Pil O O 



\0 fO to iH O 



CN O 

un o 



J cN o in in 



H OO \£) vd" O 



in 00 

O rH 



in r-- iH 
rsj O O 



ON 00 
00 rH 



E m 3 0) o -u • 



M M fc^ 
PCS Pi S 



w o n3 cj rH cxr- 



g-^ 



i § 



> O M C C >-i 



-95- 



NO. 59 

PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION^!^ IN MAJOR CATEGORIES OF 
NONAGRICULTURAL WAGE AND SALARY EMPLOYMENT 
BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION AND THE BALTIMORE SMSA: 1975 
BY PLACE OF WORK 





§ 


o- 


z 


o 
1— 1 


3 


Pn^ 






M 








o 


H 


< 


S en 




> 


hJ 




g 










M W 




O 


H 




3 




H CO 


W 






O 


II 






< 


H 






" hJ 








u 




o 


O M 


U S 


w 


kJ 








^ 


pL, H 




o 


^ 








S 




CxJ W 


2: cd 




U @ 


subdivision(i) 


p 




H 


2 ^J 


hJ Q 


< 


> 


w 


H W 


1 


Z 

s; 


3 

s 


gy 






en 


o 


< > 
CO 8 


Baltimore SMSA 


20.1 


* 


4.9 


5.9 


23.0 


6.0 


17.3 


6.6 


16.2 


D. C. Area 




















Charles 


6.8 


0.0 


8.6 


7.1 


27.3 


3.2 


10.3 


19.0 


17.6 


Montgomery 


3.7 


* 


6.2 


1.7 


18.9 


5.8 


21.5 


32.4 


9.9 


Prince George's 


4.9 


0.1 


6.8 


2.5 


27.1 


3.6 


12.1 


20.8 


22.0 


Frederick 


24.2 


* 


9.9 


3.8 


24.9 


3.6 


12.6 


4.5 


16.5 



Western Maryland 



Allegany 


31.9 


1.1 


6.1 


5.4 


21.8 


3.6 


14.5 


0.8 


14.7 


Garrett 


18.8 


6.8 


7.6 


3.6 


24.9 


3.5 


18.6 


0.4 


15.9 


Washington 


31.9 


0.1 


6.2 


5.3 


23.8 


2.6 


13.8 


3.3 


13.0 


Southern Maryland 




















Calvert 


3.9 


0.0 


39.5 


2.6 


19.4 


4.7 


13.8 


0.2 


15.9 


St. Mary's 


1.9 


0.1 


7.4 


5.5 


24.6 


3.3 


16.3 


27.7 


13.2 


Eastern Shore 




















Cecil 


20.4 


0.9 


3.7 


5.3 


22.0 


2.5 


12.5 


16.1 


16.5 


Kent 


18.3 


0.0 


7.7 


8.8 


24.0 


4.8 


20.3 


0.4 


15.6 


Queen Anne's 


24.5 


0.7 


11.3 


4.2 


26.4 


2.2 


9.2 


0.3 


21.3 


Caroline 


21.2 


0.4 


4.5 


22.2 


21.5 


2.7 


5.8 


0.6 


21.1 


Talbot 


23.2 


0.0 


7.7 


5.0 


25.8 


3.3 


20.5 


0.7 


13.9 


Dorchester 


42.3 


0.1 


7.1 


5.4 


15.6 


1.7 


9.0 


0.4 


18.4 


Wicomico 


23.6 


* 


6.9 


5.7 


31.6 


3.7 


15.4 


0.7 


12.4 


Worcester 


22.8 


0.0 


5.7 


3.5 


31.7 


4.6 


16.3 


0.9 


14.6 


Somerset 


37.6 


0.0 


2.6 


2.9 


14.9 


2.8 


7.8 


0.5 


30.9 



^^Totals may not add to 100.0% due to rounding. 

(^^Baltimore SMSA includes Baltimore City, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, 
and Howard Counties. 
* Less than 0.1%. 

Source: Maryland Department of Human Resources, Research and Analysis Division. 

Based on data obtained from Employment and Payrolls Covered by the 

Unemployment Insurance Law of Maryland, 1975 , and unpublished figures. 



PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF MAJOR CATEGORIES 
OF SELECTED NONMANUFACTURING EMPLOYIIENT : 1974 
BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



ESTIMATED 
NUMBER 

EMPLOYED IN TRANSPORTATION 
SELECTED AND OTHER PUB- 



PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION* OF ESTIMATED EMPLOYMENT 
IN SELECTED NONMANUFACTURING CATEGORIES 



SUBDIVISION 


CATEGORIES 


Lie UTIL 


Allegany 


11,233 


9.9 


Anne Arundel 


37,854 


8.9 


Baltimore City 


222,354 


12.6 


Baltimore 


109,230 


6.6 


Calvert 


1,629 


10.1 


Caroline 


3,254 


53.8 


Carroll 


7,599 


7.9 


Cecil 


4,283 


10.2 


Charles 


6,310 


12.3 


Dorchester 


3,357 


14.9 


Frederick 


14,447 


7.4 


Garrett 


2,326 


8.7 


Harford 


12,352 


7.9 


Howard 


16,952 


5.0 


Kent 


1,499 


16.0 


Montgomery 


121,715 


4.2 


Prince George's 


102,511 


7.8 


Queen Anne ' s 


1,604 


5.8 


St. Mary's 


4,824 


14.6 


Somerset 


1,249 


4.2 


Talbot 


4,898 


10.7 


Washington 


16,228 


11.6 


Wicomico 


12,601 


14.2 


Worcester 


3,989 


8.2 



raOLESALE 


FINANCE, 




AND RETAIL 


INSURANCE & 




TRADE 


REAL ESTATE 


SERVICES 


48.8 


7.3 


34.0 


57.5 


5.9 


27.6 


37.6 


13.9 


35.8 


51.8 


7.9 


33.7 


48.9 


6.5 


34.6 


28.1 


3.5 


14.6 


53.7 


8.7 


29.7 


54.5 


6.6 


28.7 


64.5 


5.3 


17.9 


52.3 


5.8 


26.9 


49.0 


14.9 


28.7 


59.5 


7.0 


24.8 


56.8 


6.7 


28.7 


42.1 


7.9 


45.0 


69.9 


10.2 


3.9 


38.6 


14.2 


42.9 


55.8 


8.8 


27.7 


70.7 


7.0 


16.5 


50.4 


7.5 


27.5 


67.4 


7.7 


20.7 


45.3 


5.8 


38.2 


52.6 


5.8 


29.9 


51.9 


6.2 


27.6 


54.3 


11.9 


25.6 



*Percents may not add to 100.0 due to rounding. 

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, County Business Patterns 1974, Table 2. 



-97- 



FEDERAL CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 
DECEMBER 31, 1975 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 



TOTAL STATE 131,290 

Allegany 315 

Anne Arundel 8,844 

Baltimore City 16,690 

Baltimore 20,639 

Calvert 259 

Caroline 95 

Carroll 190 

Cecil 1,806 

Charles 2,387 

Dorchester 142 

Frederick 1,411 

Garrett 94 

Harford 8,662 

Howard 271 

Kent 82 

Montgomery 41,167 

Prince George's 23,034 

Queen Anne's 125 

St. Mary's 3,009 

Somerset 85 

Talbot 176 

Washington 1,285 

Wicomico 348 

Worcester 167 

Unspecified 7 



Source: U. S. Civil Service Commission, Distribution of Federal Civilian 
Employment in the United States , December 31, 1975. 



iH vo \o in c 

CTl ON T 



iirtmrocjvoirii-iooNr^vi-voinro-^fONCNONin 



W hJ l>-i 
Q M O 
W > hJ 



vOcnr^OONiHiHH-vTOC 



m«*fOcsvDioir)inrofnr^ONr 



J-l 


M 






CU 




m 


0) 








m 


t/i 


>^ 


n1 


•H 




3 


en 


^si 


en 




C3 




^ 


^ 


m 




4:: 


!-i 


M 


•H 


ce) 








-to 


en 


cn 





fl) 








'O 


x: 


<u 


3 


CTi 


•H 


m 


rt 


'-) 


>> 


•S 






Td 




u 


Cfi 




w 






(-1 


d 


o 


d 


n 


CO 


C 


en 


!? 


[^ 


■H 





n 


n 


0) 




•H 


tS 


cfl 


01 




rH 


rH 


en 


c^ 


i^ 


13 


S 


:s3 


2 


Z 




P4 



J U ^ 
5 <! O 



enss-iC'OdSOen 
(U O O 'H d o o -H -H 



CX3 in CN <f t 



lONCOvOOOOOtHOOONOONC 



I 00 CO CO 00 CX5 00 



-CO>d-tHNd->a->*C>lCS|VOr 






r-tHi^oocMONiHcMinvDC3Nor^OiH<i-<rm<i-oocooooovOiH 

vX)fOvOaNvDOCr>ONOiHvDr^OOOOOOv£)fOrH<|-(NrHCOCOiHvO 

r^ooocs^cMocsJoo^~«^>.^^^~»omooo^LnCT^I^oo»d■<^cNlvocoo 

oooom'^mc^mvooo^^cN^^voooo<^fOooo^r^vou-^oo^o^cM 
rooi— iforo»d"CNcN<r<J"iHio lOi— ir^co ONvomt— !<}• iH 



c^3 bO (50 eg o CO 



5 g- 



oetJwxiE.^'t-'J-iNi 
ISiHiHCienottJSO'H 
eUO,i«iOC0>MHOQJ>-i 



i^60ox),r:M-io<uffieoo(U 



N^ c/o 



-99- 



PROPORTION OF LABOR FORCE WORKING OUTSIDE 
COUNTY OF RESIDENCE: 1960 AND 1970 



SUBDIVISION 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne ' s 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



1960 


1970 


PER CENT 


PER CENT 


9.7 


6.7 


34.9 


38.6 


13.0 


25.3 


52.1 


51.7 


24.5 


39.7 


25.3 


34.6 


28.1 


37.1 


25.6 


30.0 


22.5 


41.0 


13.3 


13.3 


15.3 


23.7 


18.5 


24.9 


15.3 


31.7 


62.0 


66.6 


11.0 


18.0 


54.2 


46.5 


62.4 


57.4 


22.5 


34.0 


3.6 


10.3 


20.2 


25.8 


6.0 


10.5 


8.6 


12.0 


9.4 


11.4 


14.2 


20.4 



STATE OF MARYLAND 32.4 



U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Population 1970 , General Social 

and Economic Characteristics , Final Report PC (1) C22, Maryland. 

U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Population 1960 , General Social 

and Economic Characteristics , Final Report PC (1) 22C, Maryland. 



NO. 64 
DESTINATION OF COMMUTERS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1970 



(BALTIMORE SMSA) 



FROM ANNE ARUNDEL 



(BALTIMORE SMSA) 



FROM CARROLL 



Places of Work 


Commuters 


Places of Work 


Commuters 


Baltimore City - CBD 


2,691 


Baltimore City - CBD 


194 


B. City - remainder 


18,299 


B. City - remainder 


1,976 


Baltimore Co. 


7,725 


Baltimore Co. 


3,921 


Anne Arundel Co, 


69,480 


Anne Arundel Co. 


514 


Carroll Co. 


77 


Carroll Co. 


16,096 


Harford Co. 


15 3 


Harford Co. 


66 


Howard Co. 


1,410 


Howard Co. 


513 


Washington, D. C. 


4,622 


Washington D. C. 


231 


Prince George's Co. 


5,261 


Montgomery Co. 


690 


Montgomery Co. 


1,165 


Prince George's Co. 


53 


D. C. SMSA - Va. part 


545 


D. C. SMSA - Va. part 


12 


Calvert Co. 


151 


York, Pa. 


20 


Charles Co. 


180 


York Co. - remainder 


116 


Frederick Co. 


87 


Adams Co. , Pa. 


415 


York, Pa. 


21 


Frederick Co. 


505 


York Co. - remainder 


32 


Washington Co. 


23 


St. Mary's Co. 


40 


New Castle Co. , Del. 


6 


Talbot Co. 


36 


Lancaster Co. , Pa. 


11 


Queen Anne's Co. 


5 


FROM HARFORD 




FROM BALTIMORE CO. 




Places of Work 




Places of Work 




Baltimore City - CBD 


439 


Baltimore City - CBD 


15,536 


B. City - remainder 


3,712 


B. City - remainder 


89,666 


Baltimore Co. 


6,493 


Baltimore Co. 


117,412 


Anne Arundel Co. 


394 


Anne Arundel Co. 


7,991 


Carroll Co. 


70 


Carroll Co. 


1,602 


Harford Co. 


30,257 


Harford Co. 


1,741 


Howard Co. 


119 


Howard Co. 


3,199 


York, Pa. 


23 


Washington, D. C. 


1,385 


York Co. - remainder 


456 


Montgomery Co. 


727 


Frederick Co. 


7 


Prince George's Co. 


1,004 


Lancaster, Pa. 


5 


D. C. SMSA - Va. part 


23 


Lancaster Co. , Pa. - remainder 43 


York, Pa. 


78 


Wilmington, Del. 


42 


York Co. - remainder 


259 


New Castle Co. , Del. - 


remainder 176 


Adams Co . 


16 


Cecil Co. 


1,323 


Frederick Co. 


15 3 


Washington, D. C. 


103 


Calvert Co. 


30 


D. C. SMSA - Md. part 


98 


Wilmington, Del. 


63 


Philadelphia, Pa. SMSA 


76 


New Castle Co. , Del. - 


remainder 47 


Pa. part 




Cecil Co. 


72 


Philadelphia, Pa. SMSA 


5 


Lancaster Co. , Pa. 


40 


N. J. part 





(continued on following page) 



NO. 64 
DESTINATION OF COMMUTERS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1970 (Cont'd.) 



(BALTIMORE SMSA) 




(FREDERICK COUNTY) 




FROM HOWARD 




FROM 




Places of Work 


Commuters 


Places of Work 


Commuters 


Baltimore City - CBD 


391 


Washington, D. C. 


546 


B. City - remainder 


3,404 


Montgomery Co. 


3,995 


Baltimore Co. 


3,048 


Prince George's Co. 


147 


Anne Arundel Co. 


2,272 


Loudon and Pr. William's 


75 


Carroll Co. 


406 


Cos. , Va. 




Harford Co. 


116 


D. C. SMSA - remainder (Va.) 


122 


Howard Co. 


7,386 


Baltimore City 


141 


Washington, D. C. 


824 


Baltimore Co. 


200 


Montgomery Co. 


1,572 


Carroll Co. 


760 


Prince George's 


2,113 


Howard Co. 


196 


D. C. SMSA - remainder 


178 


Anne Arundel Co. 


38 


Frederick Co. 


98 


Harford Co. , Pa. 


62 


Washington Co. 


11 


York Co. , Pa. 


16 


Charles Co. 


17 


Adams Co. , Pa. 


95 


York, Pa. 


6 


Frederick Co. 


24,671 


York Co. - remainder 


8 


Washington Co. 


705 


Lancaster Co. , Pa. 


6 


Franklin Co. , Pa. 


116 






Jefferson Co. , W. Va. 


34 


FROM BALTIMORE CITY 




Harrisburg, Pa. SMSA 


20 


Places of Work 








Baltimore City - CBD 


26,199 


(WESTERN MARYLAND) 




B. City - remainder 


205,040 






Baltimore Co. 


60,306 


FROM ALLEGANY 




Anne Arundel Co. 


8,709 


Places of Work 




Carroll Co. 


384 


Somerset Co., Pa. 


35 


Harford Co. 


1,019 


Allegany Co. 


24,836 


Howard Co. 


2,295 


Bedford Co. , Pa. 


33 


Washington, D. C. 


1,628 


Fulton Co. , Pa. 


5 


Montgomery Co. 


576 


Washington Co. 


177 


Prince George's Co. 


1,167 


Morgan Co., W. Va. 


29 


D. C. SMSA - remainder 


216 


Hampshire Co., W. Va. 


45 


York, Pa. 


42 


Mineral Co., W. Va. 


866 


York Co. - remainder 


67 


Garrett Co. 


100 


Frederick Co. 


150 


Grant Co. , W. Va. 


17 


Calvert Co. 


7 


Pittsburgh, Pa. SMSA 


27 


Wilmington, Del. 


121 


Franklin Co. , Pa. 


7 


New Castle Co., Del. - 


remainder 43 






Cecil Co. 


55 






Charles Co. 


39 







(continued on following page) 



NO. 64 
DESTINATION OF COMMUTERS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1970 (Cont'd.) 



(WESTERN MARYLAND) 

FROM GARRETT 
Places of Work 
Johnstown City, Pa. 
Somerset Co. , Pa. 
Garrett Co. 
Preston Co. , W. Va. 
Tucker Co . , W. Va. 
Grant Co. , W. Va. 
Mineral Co. , W. Va. 
Allegany Co . 
Fayette Co. , Pa. 
Monongalia Co., W. Va. 

FROM WASHINGTON 



(SOUTHERN MARYLAND) 



Places of Work 



(SOUTHERN MARYLAI>ID) 



FROM CALVERT 



Places of Work 
Washington, D. C. 
Prince George's Co. 
Montgomery Co. 
D. C. SMSA - Va. part 
Baltimore City 



Commuters 


Places of Work 


6 


Anne Arundel Co. 


112 


Baltimore Co. 


4,338 


Carroll Co. 


117 


Howard Co. 


38 


Calvert Co. 


110 


Charles Co. 


84 


St. Mary's Co. 


712 


Dorchester Co. 


72 




26 


FROM CHARLES 



Baltimore City 


141 


Baltimore Co. 


74 


Balto. SMSA - remainder 


140 


Washington, D. C. 


193 


Loudoun Co. , Va. 


15 


Prince William Co., Va. 


7 


D. C. SMSA - Va. part 


74 


D. C. SMSA - Md. part 


298 


York, Pa. SMSA 


71 


Harrisburg, Pa. SMSA 


25 


Washington Co. 


32,234 


Frederick Co. 


917 


Franklin Co., Pa. 


1,056 


Fulton Co. , Pa. 


50 


Allegany Co. 


43 


Morgan Co. , W. Va. 


141 


Berkeley Co., W. Va. 


531 


Jefferson Co., W. Va. 


125 


Bedford Co. , Pa. 


7 



599 

1,009 

107 

129 

21 



Places of Work 

Washington, D. C. 

Prince George's Co. 

Montgomery Co. 

Fairfax Co. 

Prince William Co., Va. 

Arlington Co. , Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Charles Co. 

St. Mary's Co. 

Calvert Co. 

King George Co. , Va. 

Baltimore SMSA 

Culpeper Co. , Va. 

FROM ST. MARY'S 
Places of Work 
Washington, D. C. 
Prince George's Co. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Arlington Co., Va. 
Montgomery Co. 
St. Mary's Co. 
Charles Co. 
Calvert Co. 
Baltimore City 
Balto. SMSA - remainder 



291 

39 

6 

6 

3,799 

153 

93 

5 



2,789 

2,333 

191 

121 

8 

134 

189 

15 

9,156 

191 

115 

51 

123 

6 



274 

198 

28 

26 

26 

14,763 

534 

218 

207 

32 



(continued on following page) 



NO. 64 
DESTINATION OF COMMUTERS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1970 (Cont'd.) 



(EASTERN SHORE) 



FROM CECIL 






Places of Work 


Commuters 


Wilmington, Del. - CBD 




72 


Wilmington - remainder 




797 


New Castle Co., Del. - remain 


ider 2, 


,521 


Cecil Co. 


13 


,926 


Salem Co., N. J. 




22 


Baltimore City 




79 


Baltimore Co. 




141 


Harford Co. 


1 


,320 


Balto. SMSA - remainder 




4 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




48 


Chester Co. , Pa. 




181 


Delaware Co. , Pa. 




63 


Phila. SMSA - remainder 




123 


Pa part 






Phila. SMSA - remainder 




44 


N. J. part 






Lancaster, Pa. 




18 


Lancaster - remainder 




79 


York, Pa. 




54 


Kent Co. 




56 


Kent Co. , Del. 




64 


FROM KENT 






Places of Work 







Wilmington, Del. 




163 


New Castle Co. , 


Del. - remainder 


274 


Cecil Co. 




120 


Baltimore City 




45 


Anne Arundel Co. 




12 


Baltimore Co. 




7 


Harford Co. 




16 


Kent Co. 




4,862 


Queen Anne's Co. 




165 


Kent Co . , Del . 




112 


Caroline Co. 




22 


Talbot Co. 




13 


Sussex Co. , Del. 




6 


Dorchester Co. 




13 


D. C. SMSA - Md. 


part 


7 



( EASTERN SHORE) 

FROM QUEEN ANNE'S 
Places of Work 
Baltimore City 
Anne Arundel Co. 
Baltimore Co. 
Balto. SMSA - remainder 
Wilmington, Del. 
New Castle Co. , Del - 

remainder 
Queen Anne's Co. 
Kent Co. 
Kent Co. , Del. 
Caroline Co. 
Talbot Co. 
Sussex Co. 
Dorchester Co. 
Washington, D. C. 
D. C. SMSA - remainder - 

Md. part 
D. C. SMSA - remainder - 

Va. part 

FROM TALBOT 
Places of Work 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore Co. 
Anne Arundel Co. 
Balto. SMSA - remainder 
Washington, D. C. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Talbot Co. 
Queen Anne's Co. 
Caroline Co. 
Dorchester Co. 
Kent Co. , Del. 
Sussex Co. , Del. 
Wicomico Co. 
Kent Co. 



Commuters 

41 

496 

149 

29 

24 

107 

4,469 

769 

170 

94 

212 

7 

28 

54 

71 

14 



55 

26 

28 

29 

19 

20 

8,182 

138 

188 

227 

6 

46 

42 

49 



(continued on following page) 



-104- 



NO. 64 
DESTINATION OF COMMUTERS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1970 (Cont'd.) 



(EASTERN SHORE) 



FROM CAROLINE 




Places of Work 


Commuters 


Baltimore Co. 


33 


Balto. SMSA - remainder 80 


Caroline Co. 


4,574 


Queen Anne's Co. 


87 


Talbot Co. 


533 


Dorchester Co. 


221 


Sussex Co. , Del. 


480 


Kent Co. , Del. 


686 


Wicomico Co. 


23 


Wilmington, Del. 


5 


New Castle Co. , Del. - 


remainder 60 


Cecil Co. 


7 


Kent Co. 


104 


Prince George's Co. 


17 


Montgomery Co. 


42 


Somerset Co. 


10 


FROM DORCHESTER 




Places of Work 





Dorchester Co. 
Talbot Co. 
Caroline Co. 
Sussex Co. , Del. 
Wicomico Co. 
Somerset Co. 
Worcester Co. 
Accomack Co. , Va. 
Queen Anne's Co. 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore Co. 
Anne Arundel Co. 
Balto. SMSA - remainder 
Washington, D. C. 
Prince George's Co. 

FROM WICOMICO 
Places of Work 
Wicomico Co. 
Dorchester Co. 
Sussex Co. , Del. 
Worcester Co. 
Somerset Co. 



9,790 

245 

301 

456 

230 

6 

13 

4 

51 

6 

28 

72 

16 

24 



17,521 
155 
821 
660 
168 



(EASTERN SHORE) 



FROM WICOMICO (Cont'd.) 
Places of Work 



Caroline Co. 
Talbot Co. 
Accomack Co. , Va. 
Kent Co. , Del. 
Queen Anne's Co. 
Anne Arundel Co. 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore Co. 
Balto. SMSA - remainder 
Washington, D. C. 
Prince George's Co. 
Montgomery Co. 

FROM SOMERSET 



Places of Work 

Somerset Co. 

Wicomico Co. 

Worcester Co. 

Accomack Co. , Va. 

Sussex Co. , Del. 

Talbot Co. 

Caroline Co. 

Queen Anne's Co. 

Kent Co. 

Anne Arundel Co. 

Baltimore Co. 

Balto. SMSA - remainder 

Washington, D. C. 

FROM WORCESTER 
Places of Work 
Worcester Co. 
Sussex Co. , Del. 
Accomack Co. , Va. 
Somerset Co. 
Wicomico Co. 
Dorchester Co. 
Caroline Co. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Cecil Co. 



22 
34 
13 
45 
16 

6 
34 
48 

7 
29 
11 
50 



4,527 

995 

210 

53 

61 

12 

7 

5 

9 

25 

16 

20 

5 



6,746 

303 

235 

135 

678 

22 

6 

17 

226 



(continued on following page) 



NO. 64 
DESTINATION OF COMMUTERS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1970 (Cont'd.) 



(WASHINGTON, D. C. SMSA) 



FROM PRINCE GEORGE'S 
Places of Work 



CBD 



Washington, D. C. 
D. C. - remainder 
Montgomery Co. 
Prince George's Co. 
Arlington Co., Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Fairfax Co. , Va. 
Loudoun Co. , Va. 
Prince William Co. 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore Co. 
Anne Arundel Co. 
Howard Co. 

Balto. SMSA - remainder 
Charles Co. 
Calvert Co. 
St. Mary's Co. 



Va. 



(WASHINGTON, D. C. SMSA) 

FROM MONTGOMERY 
Commuters Places of Work 



23,384 


Washington, D. C. - 


CBD 


20,240 


74,567 


D. C. - remainder 




47,665 


21,418 


Montgomery Co. 




110,587 


111,239 


Prince George's Co. 




12,668 


7,917 


Arlington Co. , Va. 




5,259 


2,182 


Alexandria, Va. 




806 


304 


Fairfax, Va. 




240 


275 


Falls Church, Va. 




291 


3,561 


Fairfax Co. , Va. 




2,861 


52 


Loudoun Co. , Va. 




113 


147 


Prince William Co., 


Va. 


109 


1,362 


Baltimore City 




438 


1,258 


Baltimore Co. 




413 


8,438 


Anne Arundel Co. 




1,454 


1,087 


Howard Co. 




743 


27 


Balto. SMSA - remainder 


55 


1,627 


Frederick Co. 




335 


145 


Fauquier Co. , Va. 




22 


121 


Washington Co. 




27 



Source: Maryland Department of State Planning. 



-106- 



NO. 65 
ARMED SERVICES PERSONNEL IN MARYLAND AND UNITED STATES: SEPTEMBER 30, 1975 



TOTAL MILITARY 
JURISDICTION MILITARY CIVILIAN AND CIVILIAN 



Maryland 

Army 13,571 14,721 28,292 

Navy(l) 11,200 6,A73 17,673 

Air Force 1,899 405 2,304 

Total Department 26,670 22,486^2) 49,156 
of Defense 

United States 

Army 504,812 334,798 839,610 

Navy(l) 429,684 294,705 724,389 

Air Force 479,853 241,736 721,589 

Total Department 1,414,349 941,665^2) 2,356,014 
of Defense 



(1) 



Includes Navy and Marine Corps. 



^'^ ■'Civilian column will not add due to employment by other defence activities, e. 
Defense Supply Agency and Office of the Secretary. 

Source: Department of Defense, Distribution of Personnel by State and by 
Installation , Sept. 30, 1975. 



-107- 



Z W r^ 
W O o> 

O Z rH 






CO C^ 






iH i-H 
CM O 



in rn 
CO <r 



T3 4J w 



T) CO o cr 



x) (U trj c 



a M j-i 



C c 3 (U !-t 



o M J-i C ■ 



o P-( >< <d a 



cx,<i;cgecox:ccl 



C 4-) 

m CO 



-o o 


•H 
4-) 


d) 


M iH 
CO 


u 


^ 




c,:^ 


O rH 




CO (U 


^ 


O 


CD T3 


o 


•H 


0) CO 


C T3 




.H 








Xi 


O H 


C CO 



O On 



M <r r^ o 
m ^ 00 u-i 
o o ON o 



OO On un o-| 
<r m ro r^ 
O ^ -vT iH 



^ o c^ 00 <r <r 



LD iH O < ^r CO 

in \D 00 ^ t^ m 

O r-- • 2; f^ >-t 

00 O ON vo 

On .-I mo 



. QJ C QJ W 



PL< .H C > W J_) 

CO O -H 3 CO 

>. -H -H (U CO 3 

x) .-I -u -u <J j:: CO 

0) ^ S-i CO 0) X X 





U 


(U rH 


(U 


d 


c 


d 


M -H 




(50 O 


60 


1 


CO 




•H -O 


CO 


CO X 


CO 


6 


u 


l-i T3 


^ 


M w 


i-l 




•H 




O < 


<u 


a) vw^ 


QJ 


CO 


CO 


S-J 



o 


0) 0) 




•H 


U H 


TD 




c 


QJ 


CO 


M Vj 


O 


M 


OJ 


CO 




bO^ 




CO 


d 6 


P-I 


•H 


•H 3 




(JO 


-H S 


CO 


0) 


(U 


1-1 


oi 




cu 




§2 


4«i 


s 


V-i 



QJ O O O 



CO 4-J 0) 00 OJ ^ 



j-i d <u ^ ^ 



0) (U (U QJ 4-1 ' 



1 <: <: 1 



r~~. in ro <; r^ o 
eg in ro ;z: o o 









M 
> 


CO 


a^ 








H 


w 


p 


CJ 


H 




< 


> 


< 


W 




vO 


CJ 


Q 






2 


ON 


> 


<; 




rci 






w 


an 


c/^ 


C/5 


z 


c^ 




o 


< 




CO 


w 




pci 


>-' 


g 




»-l 


>-■ 




< 


o 


^J 


o 


t^ 


hJ 


CO 



^:^ 






NO. 69 



DISTRIBUTION OF MARYLAND STATE EMPLOYEES, 
SUBDIVISION: APRIL 1977 



(1) 



BY POLITICAL 





POLITICAL 


NUMBER OF 


POLITICAL 


NUMBER OF 


POLITICAL 


NUMBER OF 


SUBDIVISION 


EMPLOYEES 


SUBDIVISION 


EMPLOYEES 


SUBDIVISION 


EMPLOYEES 


Maryland 


46,280 










Allegany 


1,121 


Frederick 


751 


Talbot 


291 


Anne Arundel 


6,029 


Garrett 


242 


Washington 


1,375 


Baltimore City 


13,839 


Harford 


858 


Wicomico 


1,273 


Baltimore 


7,081 


Howard 


1,143 


Worcester 


325 


Calvert 


182 


Kent 


176 






Caroline 


210 


Montgomery 


1,188 


Other 


2,965 


Carroll 


2,038 


Prince George's 


2,544 






Cecil 


322 


Queen Anne's 


431 






Charles 


287 


St. Mary's 


494 






Dorchester 


832 


Somerset 


283 







(1) 



Does not include employees of the State Roads Commission or employees of the 
University of Maryland. 



Source: Unpublished data furnished by the Central Payroll Bureau, April 1977. 



DISTRIBUTION OF MARYLAND STATE ROADS COMMISSION 
EMPLOYEES, BY WORKING LOCATIONS: JUNE 1977 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 



Maryland 4,363 

Total Districts 2,001 

District l^^) 178 

District 2^2) 339 

District 3(3) 337 

District 4^^) 293 

District S^^) 424 

District 6(6) 224 

District 7(7) 206 

Toll Facilities (S) 632 



Includes Dorchester, Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester Counties. 
Includes Caroline, Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne's, and Talbot Counties. 



(-'■'Includes Montgomery and Prince George's Counties. 

(^) Includes Baltimore and Harford Counties. 

(^) Includes Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary's Counties. 

("■'Includes Allegany, Garrett, and Washington Counties. 

(^Includes Carroll, Frederick, and Howard Counties. 

(^) Includes all personnel at the Chesapeake Bay, J. F. Kennedy, Potomac River, 
and Susquehanna River Bridges and the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel. 

Source: Department of Transportation, Payroll Department, unpublished information. 



NO. 71 

WORK STOPPAGES IN MARYLAND AND UNITED STATES: 1970-1976 



STOPPAGES BEGINNING 
IN YEAR 



MAN DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR 













PER CENT OF 








WORKERS 




ESTIMATED TOTAL 


YEAR 


JURISDICTION 


NUMBER 


INVOLVED 


NUMBER 


WORKING TIMe(1) 


1976 


United States (2) 


5,648 


2,420,000 


37,859,000 


.19 




Maryland 


52 


21,000 


390,900 


.10 


1975 


United States^2) 


5,031 


1,746,000 


31,237,000 


.16 




Maryland 


58 


22,900 


590,900 


.16 


1974 


United States (2) 


6,744 


2,778,000 


47,991,000 


.24 




Maryland 


69 


36,300 


487,200 


.14 


1973 


United States (2) 


5,353 


2,250,700 


27,948,400 


.16 




Maryland 


69 


19,800 


250,100 


.09 


1972 


United States *^2) 


5,010 


1,714,000 


27,066,000 


.17 




Maryland 


65 


21,000 


289,100 


N/A 


1971 


United States(2) 


5,138 


3,280,000 


47,589,000 


.32 




Maryland 


79 


46,300 


558,400 


N/A 


1970 


United States (2) 


5,716 


3,305,000 


66,414,000 


.44 




Maryland 


91 


43,100 


782,000 


.28 



N/A Not available. 
(l)private nonfarm. 



(2) 



Stoppages extending across state lines have been counted separately in each 
state affected; workers involved and man days idle were allocated among the 
states . 



Source: U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Analysis of Work- 
Stoppages , for years stated. 



-113- 



MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLLS 

While the primary cause of economic growth has been in the non-manufacturing 
sector, certainly manufacturing represents a major factor in Maryland's economy, 
with 15.4 per cent of the non-agricultural wage and salary employment. Annual 
average employment in manufacturing was 231,600 employees in 1976, or approxi- 
mately 13.1 per cent of the total employment in I-Iaryland. 

Despite a declining manufacturing employment level, payrolls increased 
significantly in the period from 1972 to 1975. Manufacturing payrolls increased 
by 19.7 per cent during this period, a figure attributable primarily to wage 
and salary increases. The largest manufacturing payrolls in Maryland during 
1975 were in the primary metals industries, electrical equipment and supplies, 
and transportation equipment. 

Average weekly earnings for all manufacturing in the State rose from 
$157.58 in 1972 to $218.59 in 1976 while average hourly earnings rose from 
$3.92 to $5.52 during the same period. 

Value added^-*-^ figures for 1973 were led by primary metals, food and 
kindred products, electrical machinery, transportation equipment and chemicals 
and allied products industries. While ranking somewhat below certain other 
mid-eastern states in value added, Maryland experienced a percentage growth 
of more than 24 per cent over the 1968 to 1973 time period. 

Historically, Baltimore City has been the dominant location for manufac- 
turing firms in Maryland. In 1976 that political subdivision had virtually 36 
per cent of the firms in the State. Next in order, in terms of number of firms, 
but far behind, are Baltimore (262), Montgomery (208), Prince George's (198), 
Anne Arundel (103), and Washington (91) Counties. 



(■'■'The difference between the value of goods and the cost of materials or 
supplies that are used in producing them. Value Added is derived by subtracting 
the cost of raw materials, parts, supplies, fuel, goods purchased for resale, 
electric energy, and contract work from the value of shipments. 

-114- 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES IN MANUFACTURING 
MARYLAND AND SELECTED OTHER AREAS: 1958-1973^1) 



IN THOUSANDS 



SOUTH 
ATLANTIC (2) 



BALTIMORE 
SMSA 



WASHINGTON 
SMSa(3) 



1973 


19, 


,871. 


,0 


1972 


19. 


.026. 


,8 


1971 


18, 


,363. 


,1 


1970 


19, 


,217. 


.2 


1969 


20. 


,035. 


.5 


1968 


19. 


,527. 


,6 


1967 


19. 


,323. 


,2 


1966 


19, 


,024 


.0 


1965 


18, 


,010, 


.2 


1964 


17, 


,268 


.5 


1963 


16, 


,958, 


.4 


1962 


16, 


,748, 


.9 


1961 


16, 


,323, 


.8 


1960 


16, 


,744, 


.1 


1959 


16. 


,657, 


.0 


1958 


16, 


,025 


.2 



2,861.5 
2,739.1 
2,580.2 
2,618.0 
2,673.3 
2,572.4 
2,501.5 
2,415.5 
2,285.2 
2,182.0 
2,124.8 
2,029.2 
1,956.0 
1,981.4 
1,959.0 
1,884.9 



263.4 
255.6 
254.4 
272.4 
289.4 
284.7 
287.6 
288.6 
270.7 
263.0 
263.7 
252.2 
254.3 
257.2 
257.0 
259.1 



184.9 
180.1 
178.5 
194.8 
208.0 
206.7 
209.7 
206.5 
193.7 
190.2 
190.5 
185.8 
191.8 
194.0 
194.5 
197.8 



58.9 
55.6 
52.8 
55.2 
57.3 
55.1 
55.5 
55.1 
53.1 
52.5 
50.1 
40.4 
40.2 
39.2 
37.6 
34.7 



^"'''^1972, 1967, 1963, and 1958 are census years and are recorded in the Census 
of Manufactures . All other years represent estitnates derived from a 
representative sample of manufacturing establishments canvassed in the 
Annual Survey of Manufactures and may therefore differ from results that would 
have been obtained from a complete canvas of all manufacturing establishments. 



(2) 



Includes : 
Maryland 
Delaware 
West Virginia 
Virginia 



District of Columbia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Florida 



^■^^The definition of this SMSA was revised for 1972. Historical data prior to 

1972 are based on the old definition. Data tabulated under the new 1972 

definition differ by 5 per cent or less from 1972 data tabulated under the old 
definition. 



Source: 



U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Manufactures: 1972, Area Statistics , 
issued August 1976. U. S. Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of 
Manufactures: 1973, Statistics for States, Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Areas, Large Industrial Counties, and Selected Cities , 
M 73 (AS) -6, issued February 1976. 



-115- 



NO. 73 

MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND BY STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION, ^^^ 
BY PLACE OF WORK, ANNUAL AVERAGES: 1972, 1974, AND 1976 
(RANKED BY NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES IN 1976) 



SIC 



INDUSTRY 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 

(IN THOUSANDS) 
1976 1974 1972 1974/1976 



PER CENT CHANGE 



All Manufacturing Total 
Durable Goods Total 

33 Primary Metal Industries 

36 Electrical Equipment 

37 Transportation Equipment 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

32 Stone, Clay & Glass Products 

38 Instruments & Miscellaneous Manufacturing 

24 Lumber and Wood Products 

25 Furniture & Fixtures 
Non-durable Goods Total 

20 Food & Kindred Products 

27 Printing and Publishing 

23 Apparel & Related Products 

28 Chemicals & Allied Products 

26 Paper and Allied Products 

30 Rubber & Miscellaneous Plastic Products 
22 Textile Mill Products 

31 Leather & Leather Products 

29 Petroleum & Coal Products 



231.6 


254.5 


248.8 


-9.0 


-6.9 


126.1 


140.8 


130.8 


-10.4 


-3.6 


29.8 


36.1 


34.4 


-17.5 


-13.4 


24.1 


24.5 


21.5 


-1.6 


12.1 


21.7 


23.5 


21.2 


-7.7 


2.4 


13.6 


16.2 


14.0 


-16.0 


-8.7 


12.0 


13.6 


12.9 


-11.8 


-7.0 


10.4 


11.5 


10.6 


-9.6 


-1.9 


6.4 


6.5 


6.0 


-1.5 


6.7 


4.2 


4.4 


4.3 


-4.5 


-2.3 


3.9 


4.5 


5.0 


-13.3 


-22.0 


105.5 


113.7 


118.0 


-7.2 


-10.6 


31.4 


33.5 


35.9 


-6.3 


-12.5 


19.2 


20.3 


19.7 


-5.4 


-2.5 


17.6 


18.5 


20.6 


-4.9 


-14.6 


13.3 


15.8 


16.6 


-15.8 


-19.9 


10.1 


10.4 


9.5 


-2.9 


6.3 


9.6 


10.5 


10.4 


-8.6 


-7.7 


1.5 


1.4 


1.8 


7.1 


-16.7 


1.5 


2.1 


2.3 


-28.6 


-34.8 


1.3 


1.2 


1.2 


8.3 


8.3 



^-■-^Based on 1972 SIC Industry Title. 

Source: Maryland Department of Human Resources, 
ment , issued May 1977. 

-116- 



Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Employ- 



NO. 7A 

MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN THE BALTIMORE SMSA BY SELECTED STANDARD 
INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION^^) 
ANNUAL AVERAGES: 1972, 1974, 1976 
(RANKED BY NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES IN 1976) 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 
(IN THOUSANDS) 



PER CENT CHANGE 



SIC 



INDUSTRY 



All Manufacturing Total 
Durable Goods Total 

33 Primary Metal Industries 

36 Electrical Equipment 

37 Transportation Equipment 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

32 Stone, Clay & Glass Products 

38 Instruments, Miscellaneous Manufacturing 

25 Furniture & Fixtures 
24 Lumber & Wood Products 
Non-durable Goods Total (2) 

20 Food & Kindred Products 

27 Printing & Publishing 

23 Apparel & Related Products 

28 Chemicals & Allied Products 

26 Paper & Allied Products 

30 Rubber & Miscellaneous Plastic Products 

22 Textile Mill Products 

29 Petroleum & Coal Products 



1976 


1974 


1972 


1974/1976 


1972/1976 


161.6 


179.1 


178.2 


-9.8 


-9.3 


96.0 


109.4 


104.5 


-12.2 


-8.1 


28.6 


34.8 


33.5 


-17.8 


-14.6 


18.2 


17.9 


16.5 


1.7 


10.3 


14.6 


15.7 


15.2 


-7.0 


-3.9 


10.7 


13.3 


12.4 


-19.5 


-13.7 


8.7 


10.4 


10.0 


-16.3 


-13.0 


7.0 


7.6 


6.8 


-7.9 


2.9 


3.2 


3.6 


3.6 


-11.1 


-11.1 


2.7 


3.6 


4.0 


-25.0 


-32.5 


2.3 


2.5 


2.5 


-8.0 


-8.0 


65.6 


69.7 


73.7 


-5.9 


-11.0 


16.6 


17.4 


19.6 


-4.6 


-15.3 


11.2 


11.9 


12.6 


-5.9 


-11.1 


11.0 


11.8 


13.5 


-6.8 


-18.5 


10.6 


11.7 


11.6 


-9.4 


-8.6 


7.7 


7.7 


6.9 


0.0 


11.6 


5.8 


6.4 


6.4 


-9.4 


-9.4 


1.1 


0.9 


1.0 


22.2 


10.0 


1.0 


0.8 


1.0 


25.0 


0.0 



Based on 1972 SIC Industry Title. 
(^^Non-additive. Data withheld for disclosure reasons. 

Source: Maryland Department of Human Resources, Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Employ- 
ment , issued May 1977. 

-117- 






Pi hJ 

H M 
U IS 



W ON 
PL. r-\ 



H CM CN CN I CO m CNl 



1 00 r-. (T\ o 00 



H o r-^ o in a^ csj 00 

H O <r> ON CT\ <r vD 00 



O^Om0^^^vO^OOCOOI^I^ 

cNiOLni^or^oo-<}-vDOooin 
ooocoooin<T>r~~r^cMOr~- 



oofO,— i>d-CNj<roocNvOLnoor-- 
r--crNvoor-»oor~>.cNfOcNooin 

O(TiOCN<rr0C0fsJCMrH00 



CNj ro CO iH r 



<d-'HcMfOr^CNt^'H<J-C^fOcsj 
OOOOrHvDCNJOiHmCri^rvD 

CNjco<rro>d-vDr^incocMcT\ 



cs n ro iH rH 



3 M-l B M (-1 



(U CU (1) 4J 



•H 0) •> 
4-1 4.) >^ 

13 rt (-1 



> n3 0) C 



U CO M M (U 

I 4-1 3 -H 

I +J >-l ». 4J >-l 

I O O Q) .H Q) 

I CO Cu O 3 ,r: (30 

I >-i m G o M C 

I 4J C cd -H -H -H 

I C to C >-i ft^ c 

: O V4 .H 00 -H 

: O H fe <: S 



4-14-10) 



CO 00 4J 



MANUFACTURING PAYROLLS IN MARYLAND, RANK BY 
DOLLAR VALUE IN 1975: 1975 AND 1972 



PER CENT 

CHANGE 

1972/1975 



All Manufacturing Total 
Durable Goods Total 
Non-durable Goods Total 



$2,711,014,780 $2,265,118,547 19.7 
1,652,439,764 1,355,012,820 22.0 
1,058,575,016 930,105,727 13.8 



33 Primary Metal Industries 472,101,397 392,808,522 20.2 

36 Electrical Equipment and Supplies^) 322,998,858 128,324,521 NA 

37 Transportation Equipment 311,425,455 243,445,531 27.9 
20 Food and Kindred Products 293,479,177 261,425,872 12.3 

27 Printing and Publishing 231,479,473 184,913,476 25.2 

28 Chemicals and Allied Products 184,166,192 161,123,130 14.3 
35 Machinery, except Electrical 170,928,114 143,061,792 19.5 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 142,578,663 123,669,732 15.3 
32 Stone, Clay, and Glass Products 117,840,880 102,712,226 14.7 

23 Apparel and Related Products 112,292,195 122,237,976 -8.1 
26 Paper and Allied Products 101,697,131 80,630,554 26.1 
30 Rubber and Plastics Products, N. E. C. 98,024,569 84,063,350 16.6 

24 Lumber and Wood Products 31,627,353 26,820,724 17.9 

25 Furniture and Fixtures 28,858,567 37,158,221 -22.3 
22 Textile Mill Products 12,482,074 11,885,861 5.0 

All Other Durable Goods^^^ 54,080,677 156,981,551 NA 

All Other Non-durable Goods 22,691,389 23,825,508 -4.8 

NA - Not Applicable. 

^ ^The data for 1975 and 1972 are not strictly comparable due to revisions in the 
Standard Industrial Code in 1972. The two digit classification experienced one 
major revision: SIC 19, "Ordnance and Accessories" was incorporated into SIC 36, 
"Electrical Equipment and Supplies." The 1972 figures are based on the 1967 
SIC while data for 1975 are based on the 1972 SIC. 

Source: Maryland Department of Human Resources. Employment and Payrolls Covered 
by the Unemployment Insurance Law of Maryland , for years stated. 



-119- 



NUMBER OF MANUFACTURING FIRMS IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: 1976, 1970, 1960, 1950 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



Maryland 



Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



55 


56 


81 


67 


105 


99 


104 


59 


879 


1,100 


1,513 


1,738 


262 


244 


208 


130 


10 


17 


20 


7 


27 


33 


49 


52 


52 


67 


89 


83 


40 


52 


64 


57 


23 


22 


30 


18 


58 


65 


82 


67 


69 


67 


83 


78 


17 


23 


36 


33 


51 


47 


71 


54 


54 


39 


24 


18 


15 


20 


26 


21 


208 


168 


131 


79 


198 


178 


145 


71 


18 


21 


24 


9 


14 


23 


39 


20 


32 


41 


61 


50 


41 


51 


58 


44 


91 


103 


114 


124 


66 


77 


102 


112 


31 


38 


55 


70 



Nondistributable 



18 



N/A 



Maryland Department of Human Resources, Employment and Payrolls Covered by 
the Unemployment Insurance Law of Maryland , first quarter issue for the 
stated years. 



MANUFACTURING PAYROLLS, MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES, REGIONALLY 
RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH: 1971 AND 1976 



REGION AND STATE 



1976 
($1,000,000) 



1971 
($1,000,000) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1971/1976 



United States 



$271,138 



$181,117 



New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 
MARYLAND 
Delaware 
New York 



11,363 

19,220 

3,284 

1,244 

21,600 



8,424 
13,488 

2,422 

891 

17,345 



34.9 
42.5 
35.6 
39.6 
24.5 



Kentucky 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Tennessee 
Georgia 
Alabama 
Virginia 
West Virginia 



3,603 
7,663 
3,868 
5,461 
5,216 
3,973 
4,537 
1,854 



2,207 
4,892 
2,301 
3,492 
3,412 
2,456 
2,843 
1,196 



63.3 
56.6 
68.1 
56.4 
52.9 
61.8 
59.6 
55.0 



Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, 
August 1977, August 1974. 



Survey of Current Business , 



NO. 79 

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ENGAGED IN MANUFACTURING, MARYLAInTD AND SELECTED 
EASTERN STATES, REGIONALLY RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH IN TOTAL EMPLOYEES: 
1968 AND 1973 



TOTAL EMPLOYEES 



1973 



1968 



REGION AND STATE (1,000) (1,000) 



PRODUCTION WORKERS 



1973 



1968 



(1,000) (1,000) 



PER CENT GROWTH 



TOTAL EMPLOYEES 
1968/1973 



United States 



19,871 19,528 



New Jersey 
Delaware 
Pennsylvania 
MARYLAND 
New York 

Southeast 



Kentucky 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Tennessee 
Georgia 
Alabama 
Virginia 
West Virginia 



852 


874 


71 


75 


1,465 


1,554 


263 


285 


1,712 


1,911 


277 


2 32 


781 


669 


366 


320 


493 


434 


484 


429 


334 


298 


386 


355 


128 


123 



560 


591 


39 


40 


,059 


1,131 


184 


203 


,105 


1,264 


217 


183 


635 


556 


299 


266 


389 


345 


382 


345 


272 


242 


301 


280 


98 


95 



-2.5 
-5.3 
-5.7 



19.4 
16.7 
14.4 
13.6 
12.3 
12.1 
8.7 
4.1 



Sources: U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of 
Manufactures: 1973, Statistics for States, Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Areas, Large Industrial Counties, and Selected Cities , 
M 73 (AS) -6, issued February 1976. 



-122- 



VALUE ADDED BY l^IANUFACTURE , MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES, 
REGIONALLY RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH: 1968 AND 1973 



VALUE ADDED 

($1,000,000) PER CENT CHANGE 

REGION AND STATE 1973 1968 1968/1973 



United States 



Pennsylvania 26,818 20,318 32.0 

New Jersey 17,754 13,503 31.5 

MARYLAND 5,257 4,084 28.7 

New York 33,610 26,931 24.8 

Delaware 1,448 1,203 20.4 



405,393 


284,863 


26,818 


20,318 


17,754 


13,503 


5,257 


4,084 


33,610 


26,931 


1,448 


1,203 


5,853 


3,394 


8,619 


5,103 


12,593 


7,575 


6,471 


4,061 


8,773 


5,542 


6,875 


4,627 


5,841 


3,982 


2,884 


2,220 



South Carolina 5,853 3,394 72.5 

Georgia 8,619 5,103 68.9 

North Carolina 12,593 7,575 66.2 

Kentucky 6,471 4,061 59.3 

Tennessee 8,773 5,542 58.3 

Virginia 6,875 4,627 48.6 

Alabama 5,841 3,982 46.7 

West Virginia 2,884 2,220 29.9 



Sources : 



U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of 
Manufactures: 1973, Statistics for States, Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Areas, Large Industrial Counties, and Selected Cities , 
M 73(AS)-6, issued February 1973. 



-123- 



VALUE ADDED BY PRINCIPAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES IN MARYLAND, RANK 
BY DOLLAR VOLUME: 1973 AND 1967 



1973 
($1,000,000) 



1967 PER CENT CHANGE 
($1,000,000) 1967/1973 



All Industries 

33 Primary Metals Products 
20 Food and Kindred Products 

36 Electrical Machinery 

37 Transportation Equipment 

28 Chemicals and Allied Products 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 

27 Printing and Publishing 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

23 Apparel and Related Products 

32 Stone, Clay, and Glass Products 

26 Paper and Allied Products 

30 Rubber and Plastic Products, N. E 

24 Lumber and Wood Products 

38 Instruments and Related Products 

25 Furniture and Fixtures 
22 Textile Mill Products 



$5,257.1 


$3,781.3 


39.0 


780.9 


524.6 


48.9 


715.1 


525.6 


36.1 


585.0 


367.2 


59.3 


490.0 


460.5 


3.9 


450.5 


422.5 


6.6 


443.4 


202.3 


119.2 


364.5 


209.9 


73.7 


281.4 


211.3 


33.2 


244.9 


193.7 


26.4 


243.2 


160.7 


51.3 


184.2 


.133.6 


37.9 


169.3 


113.2 


49.6 


93.2 


36.7 


154.0 


49.6 


29.5 


68.1 


42.5 


38.8 


9.5 


Not shown 


21.1 


N/A 



U. S. Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1972 , A 
Statistics, issued August 1976. 

U. S. Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufactures: 1973 , 
Statistics for States, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas , 
Large Industrial Counties, and Selected Cities , M 73(AS)-6, issued 
February 1976. 



-124- 



AVERAGE WEEKLY AND AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
IN MARYLAND BY PLACE OF WORK: 1976 AND 1972(1), 
(RANKED BY 1976 DOLLAR VALUE OF AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNING) 



All Manufacturing Average 
Durable Goods Average 
Non-durable Goods Average 

33 Primary Metals Industries 
37 Transportation Equipment 

28 Chemicals and Allied Products 

32 Stone, Clay and Glass Products 

27 Printing and Publishing 

35 Machinery, Except Electrical 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

36 Electrical Equipment 

20 Food and Kindred Products 

26 Paper and Allied Products 

22 Textile Mill Products 

23 Apparel and Related Products 
31 Leather and Leather Products 



WEEKLY EARNINGS HOURLY EARNINGS 
1976 1972 1976 1972 



in the SIC codes, and estimates based on different Benchmark dates. 

arce: Maryland Department of Human Resources, Nonagricultural Wage and Salary 
Employment . 



$218.59 


$157.58 


$5.52 


$3.92 


246.83 


177.55 


6.14 


4.32 


186.03 


136.02 


4.77 


3.47 


306.59 


201.81 


7.57 


4.91 


287.75 


212.76 


7.07 


5.09 


241.12 


161.87 


5.66 


3.91 


234.99 


177.24 


5.86 


4.21 


227.40 


173.66 


6.00 


4.43 


221.91 


169.74 


5.69 


4.12 


218.29 


169.31 


5.43 


4.16 


194.25 


141.92 


4.82 


3.47 


185.02 


131.99 


4.72 


3.35 


182.74 


138.51 


4.49 


3.37 


133.90 


100.88 


3.46 


2.58 


128.49 


100.18 


3.64 


2.83 


118.01 


97.93 


2.98 


2.43 



TRADE 

Trade activity encompasses retail trade, wholesale trade, and selected 
services. Figures developed by the United States Bureau of the Census in its 
business censuses are quite interesting. 

More than 31,000 retail establishments were situated in Maryland in 1972, 
and their aggregate sales were approximately $9.5 billion. These figures 
represent a 25.3 per cent increase in the number of establishments and a 63.3 
per cent increase in dollar volume from the data reported five years earlier. 
Eating and drinking places, food stores, and gasoline service stations were 
the more frequently reported types of establishments of those categorized, 
while food stores, automotive dealers, and general merchandise group stores 
reported for higher dollar volumes. 

The number of wholesale trade establishments grew by more than 20 per cent 
over the same period, and a 71.4 per cent dollar volume increase was shown. 
Establishments dealing in machinery, groceries, and motor vehilces and auto- 
motive equipment were the more frequently reported, and dollar volume rankings 
showed motor vehicle and automotive equipment, groceries, and machinery 
establishments leading the list. 

The reader is cautioned to read the note on page 134 before comparing the 
data concerning selected service industries activity reported for earlier years. 
Nearly 64 per cent more in terms of numbers of establishments were reported 
in 1972 than in 1967, and their receipts were up nearly 98 per cent over the 
period. 



-126- 



NO. 83 

TRADE ACTIVITY IN MARYLAND, ESTABLISHMENTS WITH PAYROLL ONLY: 



TYPE OF ACTIVITY 



NUMBER OF 
ESTABLISHMENTS 



SALES OR 
RECEIPTS 
1972 ($1,000) 



APPROXIMATE PER 

CENT CHANGE 

1967/1972 

SALES PAYROLL 

OR ENTIRE 

RECEIPTS YEAR 



Retail Trade 19,431 

Buildinp, Materials, Hardware, Garden 709 

Supply and Mobil Home Dealers 

General Merchandise 627 

Food Stores 2,891 

Automotive Dealers 1,223 

Gasoline Service Stations 2,622 

Apparel and Accessory Stores 1,694 
Furniture, Home Furnishings, and Equipment 1,225 

Eating and Drinking Places 4,376 

Drug and Proprietary Stores 742 

Miscellaneous Retail Stores 3,322 



$9,049,817 
314,759 



1,479,083 
1,964,487 
1,758,179 
650,938 
495,343 
442,925 
693,316 
383,188 
867,599 



61 
51 

55 
53 
72 



93 
65 
58 
92 



50 
79 
83 
96 
79 



49 
125 



Wholesale Trade 4,746 10,212,246 71 72 

Durable Goods 2,912 6,090,804 N/A N/A 

Motor Vehicles and Automotive Parts and 522 2,135,508 142 87 

Supplies 

Furniture and Home Furnishings 151 186,623 95 92 

Sporting, Recreational, Photographs and 92 112,877 89 92 

Hobby Goods, Toys and Supplies 

Metals and Minerals, except Petroleum- 82 497,872 -5 -5 

Nondurable Goods 1,834 4,121,442 N/A N/A 

Apparel, Piece Goods ill 152,308 56 100 

Groceries and Related Products 550 1,370,225 45 46 

Farm Product Raw Materials 75 228,298 81 30 

Petroleum and Petroleum Products 224 865,503 41 30 



Selected Services 11,085 

Hotels, Motels, etc. 462 

Personal Services 3,254 

Business Services 2,272 

Automotive Repair and Services 1,292 

Miscellaneous Repair Services 792 

Amusement and Recreation Services 1,095 

Dental Laboratories 85 

Legal Services 1,291 

Architectural, Engineering, and Land- 542 
Surveying Services 



2,058,343 
118,853 
231,789 
809,967 
206,181 
110,326 
198,332 
12,054 
150,790 
220,051 



91 

77 

23 

87 



96 

89 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 



119 

79 

21 

99 

102 

81 

78 

N/A 

N/A 

N/A 



N/A - Not available. 



U. S. Bureau of the Census, Area Statistics, Maryland, 1972 Census of Retail Trade , 
RC 72-A21. U. S. Bureau of the Census, Area Statistics, Maryland, 1972 Census of 
Wholesale Trade , WC 72-A-21. U. S. Bureau of the Census, Area Statistics, Maryland, 
1972 Census of Selected Service Industries , SC 72-A21. U. S. Bureau of the Census, 
Census of Business . 1967, Retail Trade: Maryland, BC 67-RA22 (Revised). U. S. 
Bureau of the Census, Census of Business , 1967, Wholesale Trade: Maryland, BC 67-WA22. 
U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Business , 1967, Selected Services; Maryland, 
BC 67-SA22. 



0-) a^ 



vO 00 vO vO 00 O 



o rH 00 r- 



■CMOiH00<r-<l-ONOC 



\cNrHvDv£)ro<j-^r-~r 



00 r-- 
in vo 




r~- a^ o 

00 VO rH 


m 


00 


in 


in 


5^ 


vC 


ro 00 P^ 
OO 00 rH 


00 


rHoovDvooina\<r 
.Hoovorsir^-<rcMrH 


O M 
00 OJ 


LO 


O rH O 
lO ro O 

en o <t 


in 


in 


CM 


S 


00 


in 


r- M r^ 
in 00 in 

0^ 00 CM 


ON 


voinr--cNjvx)in<J-<r 

-J"CNC0r^vDCNiH\O 
0> rH ~;r M vO in vO 



O 00 
00 00 
<f en 



o r^ o vo <r <i- 

On r-~ 00 00 O vD 

<t o r^ ^D in -Cl- 



in o VO CN) 



c^ 00 <r r~- 



cMincnrocNrMininooooinr 

rsiin<rcNiooo<rcNvor--LnrH 
1— iro<rinr-^cNioooNvooNvooo 
csiiHrsit— irncNioooiro<roo 



^rl 



1 O CO CN O 0> 
\ r^ CO ON 00 On 



CN 00 O 00 



icMvooovoo>-crco<r-j-cN 



<r(Ti-<roovo<r vdcmcocvi 
oooooinin<r r^for~-a\ 
ONvocor^-incNi ooooin 



invD iHi-HvOCM'-HC 

CNtH Csl\DOiHON~ 

COO OOCOl—OCTiT 



vDCNCMiHOmor^-v^CvJ- 

<fcNCNi— iLnr~~ONOOcoooc 
r^u-i'-HrHin cocsicTv c 



2 >,g 



00 u I 



cu m >-i d m -i-J 0) 
omojo-H-ucniH 

•H (U 6 -U ^ CU 'H 

>(JO(/)C-H mm 



-S^' 



H C .H r 

•H a- 

rH -O &, 



bO <4) iH O 



3 0) 'T3 O O 

j cn d o -u M 



CT3 f- cr -H OO 
CU C W 4-1 3 






> eu 

•H X) (X 

4-1 oj <; 



x: ^ o 

dj 0) u o 



• P-i M 

. e m 

: 3 -H 

0) Vj 

•^ rH OJ 
1 O 4-J 

) 4^ S 

i o CO 

CD 
> 1^ 

< O PU 



< 4-) 3 0) O >-i (U VJ 
) O »-l -H >-l m rH CO 

: s P p^ o P^ fxq in ; 



O ON 



o^ CM vo <: <; <: 

in 00 vD z S IZ 



^ in o <: <: <; 

s <r rH ■--- -^ ^ 
< ^ ^ Z 2 S 



^ 


^ 


o 


m 


(TnI 


o-i 


P^ 


r-^ 


r~- 


<r 


CN 


<r 


00 


in 


in 


0> vO 


o 


ON 








o 


r^ 


ro 


LO 






no 


o> 


ON 








o 


vO 


a> 


v£l 


o 


ON 


v£) 


ON 


ON 


■-1 


■-• 


sO 


00 




v£> 


O 


CI 


00 


o 


rsi 


vO 


r^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


oo 


rsi 


r-. 


C7N 


in 


r-) 


00 


^ 


(-, 






o 


00 


^ 


m 


vO 






viJ 








i~^ 




ON 




>— 1 


m 






<r 


o 




1—1 


CN 


00 


CN 


.-1 




iH 






CN 



CTN O CTN 00 

CM r-i m r~- 

■H in i-H 00 



00 <r v£) 
CO ON <r 



<! C^ CO C3> iH <3 <3 <! 

■ vD -H r^ in Z Z 2: 



(-- o r^ in 




<r o csi CO 


<N O 


rH M (N CO 


a> r^ 



Hr~^ cococo<<C<C 

HON i-HOi-H^^------- 

gr-. ON<>oooZ22 

-co ,-1 nH rH 



. in in CO ON 
I CO <r vo v£) 



o :2 >-i i^) 3 



> > >-i -H QJ 0) 



I W O <U 
I O W CJ 



P 3 e S-i U ct! 

O 4-1 <U O -H >-i 00 

<u o cn ^ ?> =) c 



C -H J-l 



^ t 



\ o ^ <i) <i) i-i 

; s o Q kJ < 



ca ^ o 
I pa 



fl) 






CU 




a 


>-i 


H 




XI 


CO 


OJ 




CO 


CIJ 


ex x: 








en 




•H 


OJ 


O 


15 


o 


Cfl 


rH 


CIJ 


CD 




4-1 


o 






13 
CO 


P5 


§ 


01 
CAl 


C 










CT3 












(0 


vO 


^ 


v^ 


- 


QJ 


ON 


C7N 


ON 



(X X) o 



TD O C ^ OJ 



CU T3 X) 



Cfl CO Cfl 



pt; 


0) 




X) 




CO 


0) 


(-1 


-a 


H 


CO 






(U 


H 






CO 




UJ 




CI) 






4-t 


o 


^ 


g 


U-l 


14-1 


o 


o 




en 

3 


en 


cn 


ri 


c 


<D 


dj 


u 


u 


CM 


rsi 






ON 


ON 







CO 


cn 


CIJ 


QJ 


C 


C 






cn 




3 


3 


PQ 


pq 


14-1 


i« 


O 


O 


cn 


cn 


3 


3 


cn 


cn 


c 


C 


0) 


cu 


u 


u 



O T3 

o c 


cn 


cn 


cn 


cn 


cn 


cn 


M CO 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 




cn 


tn 


cn 


CO 


C/J 


cn 


00 cn 


n 


c 


C 


C 


PI 




c X) 


CU 


CU 


CU 


.^ 


<u 


.<v 



o o o o o o 

3 3 3 3 3 3 



CO M !-4 S-i 1-1 
CU 4-1 3 3 3 3 



CU J (U (U (U 



iH CsJ CO 



MARYLAND RETAIL TRADE, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1972 







ALL ESTABLISHMENTS 




ESTABLISHMENTS WITH PAYROLL 






















PAYROLL 




POLITICAL 








SALES 








SALES 


ENTIRE YEAR 


PAID 


SUBDIVISION 


NUMBER 




($1,000) 


NUI-IBER 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


EMPLOYEES (1) 


Maryland 


31 


,325 


9 


,480,043 


19 


,431 


9 


,049,817 


1,186,746 


228,243 


Allegany 




818 




192,364 




510 




178,383 


20,429 


4,257 


Anne Arundel 


2 


,340 




742,245 


1 


,399 




710,003 


90,079 


17,533 


Baltimore City 


7 


,000 


1 


,811,264 


4 


,744 


1 


,719,471 


261,800 


52,393 


Baltimore 


4 


,992 


1 


,621,012 


2 


,952 


1 


,551,125 


195,677 


39,854 


Calvert 




188 




37,733 




124 




35,069 


3,765 


724 


Caroline 




206 




29,398 




108 




25,053 


2,587 


542 


Carroll 




740 




130,541 




356 




117,007 


13,920 


2,784 


Cecil 




451 




90,984 




289 




82,227 


8,749 


1,630 


Charles 




505 




124,091 




296 




117,299 


14,159 


2,816 


Dorchester 




321 




61,640 




208 




55,923 


7,084 


1,359 


Frederick 




877 




206,868 




564 




196,190 


25,064 


4,750 


Garrett 




206 




44,625 




128 




40,860 


4,468 


914 


Harford 




940 




232,929 




568 




220,925 


26,109 


5,152 


Howard 




583 




138,526 




338 




120,869 


18,757 


4,039 


Kent 




198 




35,100 




116 




31,162 


3,535 


749 


Montgomery 


3 


,520 


1 


,513,142 


2 


,116 


1 


,469,025 


192,565 


33,756 


Prince George's 


4 


,073 


1 


,727,757 


2 


,466 


1 


,681,003 


213,577 


38,797 


Queen Anne's 




218 




32,931 




121 




28,140 


3,295 


741 


St. Mary's 




457 




81,625 




267 




76,002 


8,836 


1,840 


Somerset 




206 




25,000 




103 




19,541 


2,033 


447 


Talbot 




349 




77,073 




203 




70,593 


8,906 


1,664 


Washington 




991 




238,715 




604 




224,951 


2,510 


54,597 


Wicomico 




618 




192,532 




396 




183,043 


22,771 


4,245 


Worcester 




522 




91,948 




397 




88,953 


10,689 


1,789 



(1) 



For week including March 12, 1970. 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Area Statistics, Maryland, 1972 Census of Retail Trade , 
RC 72-A-21. 



Pi ^ >> 
>< o 
<: Pi w 



CO o 

w o 



H > 



oo o -* iH <r 
CO vo <r ro m 
r- r^ m <r r- 



O vO in vO 0^ 

r^ rH C30 t-H ON 

ro on <r m fo 



00 ro O O 



on cN 00 vo <r 
r^ O r-^ in 00 

VOVOON OOOQCOOOOO 



CN r^ r^ O ON 
00 o r-^ fo in 

00 00 00 (~n in 



1 vc 00 cnJ <r ro CO vo 

< ^r o r^ r^ <r vD 00 

1 in <r CO r^ ON vo o 

> I— I in rH in ON CO in 



ON ON O CNl -d" 

in m vo m in 

ON O ON CO <i- 



-Cf OJ CO -^ -vj 



CM 00 in in r 



iH 00 ON ON CM 



oo^ooooco cMinmiH 

r^coc3N<a-vo ctnO'-hcm 

vOCOCOr^OO vOOOCM^ 

ocNinr^^^ r^ino^ 

vOON.H<trH CsJ^rH<r 
00 00 rH rH 



C3N <r VO iH rH 

00 r^ o 00 rH 

ON 00 o o in 

C7N 00 ON O CJN 

CM O CO CO rH 

rH <r in 00 



00 in ON <r I 



^ CO in 00 rH 

O rH rH <f t-- 
CM VO -<1- CO CM 



H VO CM rH C3N 

^ o CM <r vo 

- O CO CM CM 



00 C7N v£) r^ C3N 



rH CO in CO r 

CO vD CO ON r 

CO <r CM O r 



CM ON CJN VO 



0) (U 4-1 4.) > 

rH d ^ rH -H 

rH C to CO CO 

<; < pq pq O 



H rH QJ Q) 



cc cd 0) ^ o 



rn x: O o 



UOUUQ PMOffiffit^ SPhO-OOCO HISIS:^ 



NO. 87 
MARYLAND WHOLESALE TRADE, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1972 











PAYROLL ENTIRE 




POLITICAL 


NUMBER OF 


SALES 


YEAR 


PAID 


SUBDIVISION 


ESTABLISHMENTS 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


EMPLOYEES (1) 


Maryland 


4,746 


$10,212,246 


$580,399 


62,923 


Allegany 


109 


101,918 


6,774 


818 


Anne Arundel 


194 


585,853 


22,809 


2,367 


Baltimore City 


1,400 


3,497,791 


220,906 


23,892 


Baltimore 


704 


1,639,332 


91,343 


8,980 


Calvert 


8 


10,549 


664 


104 


Caroline 


36 


39,491 


1,720 


252 


Carroll 


80 


56,476 


4,187 


600 


Cecil 


43 


28,429 


2,271 


360 


Charles 


50 


53,947 


3,248 


484 


Dorchester 


46 


25,493 


1,835 


304 


Frederick 


107 


102,183 


9,883 


1,182 


Garrett 


32 


16,841 


1,306 


231 


Harford 


79 


90,398 


7,511 


942 


Howard 


106 


423,282 


15,364 


1,453 


Kent 


36 


23,181 


1,444 


261 


Montgomery 


604 


1,376,178 


64,148 


5,657 


Prince George's 


567 


1,643,922 


81,383 


9,006 


Queen Anne's 


27 


25,342 


1,880 


433 


St. Mary's 


28 


32,599 


2,500 


307 


Somerset 


38 


16,163 


1,483 


333 


Talbot 


57 


84,659 


7,241 


1,188 


Washington 


171 


147,713 


15,141 


1,794 


Wicomico 


157 


157,363 


12,781 


1,618 


Worcester 


67 


33,143 


2,577 


407 



(1) 



For week including flarch 12, 1972. 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Area Statistics, Maryland, 1972 Census of 
Wholesale Trade, WC 72-A-21. 



-132- 



MARYLAND WHOLESALE TRADE, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1967 











PAYROLL ENTIRE 






POLITICAL 


NUMBER OF 


SALES 


YEAR 


PAID 
EMPLOYEES ^^'' 


SUBDIVISION 


ESTABLISHMENTS 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


Maryland 


3,943 


$5,957,830 


$338,410 


50 


,889 


Allegany 


107 


55,799 


3,860 




701 


Anne Arundel 


120 


288,851 


10,716 


1 


,589 


Baltimore City 


1,700 


2,823.661 


171,274 


25 


,484 


Baltimore 


441 


897,924 


43,492 


5 


,935 


Calvert 


5 


2,203 


203 




53 


Caroline 


28 


33,223 


1,020 




203 


Carroll 


47 


31,409 


2,040 




400 


Cecil 


24 


13,036 


932 




198 


Charles 


37 


41,928 


2,350 




425 


Dorchester 


42 


23,963 


1,255 




312 


Frederick 


71 


61,259 


4,874 




822 


Garrett 


22 


10,017 


526 




130 


Harford 


43 


24,556 


1,739 




313 


Howard 


33 


40,191 


1,817 




311 


Kent 


22 


9,485 


614 




120 


Montgomery 


400 


738,393 


27,467 


3 


,832 


Prince George's 


348 


558,707 


38,947 


5 


,634 


Queen Anne ' s 


20 


9,716 


1,003 




200 


St. Mary's 


17 


10,978 


1,129 




184 


Somerset 


33 


15,391 


1,381 




326 


Talbot 


54 


32,862 


1,998 




405 


Washington 


151 


102,515 


9,998 


1 


,517 


Wicomico 


137 


110,924 


8,273 


1 


,469 


Worcester 


41 


20,839 


1,502 




326 



(1) 



For week including 1-Iarch 12, 1967. 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Business, 1967 , ^^olesale Trade: 
Maryland, BC 67-WA22. 



NOTE CONCERNING COMPARABILITY OF 

THE 1967 AND 1972 CENSUSES OF SELECTED SERVICE 

INDUSTRIES* 



The 1967 and 1972 censuses were conducted under similar conditions and 
procedures. However, strict comparability of the data for the two censuses 
is limited. In both 1967 and 1972, classifications were based on the 
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Manual; however, there were major 
revisions to the SIC structure in 1972 which limit the comparability of 
data between these two censuses. It was not possible to retabulate 1967 
data based on the revised 1972 classifications for comparative purposes, 
since in many cases the necessary information was not available for 
assigning the new 1972 classifications to the 1967 records. In the following 
tables which deal with the Maryland Selected Services Industries, data for 
the State as a whole are presented for both 1972 and 1967 based on the 1967 
classifications. However, tables presenting 1972 data by political subdivision 
are not comparable with the 1967 breakdowns by political subdivision. 



^Abbreviated note from the Bureau of the Census, 1972 Census of 
Selected Services Industries , Maryland, SC 72-A-21, Appendix A, page A2. 



-134- 



NO. 89 
SELECTED SERVICES (D IN MARYLAND BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1972^2) 







ALL ESTABLISHMENTS 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 


[ PAYROLL 














PAYROLL 




POLITICAL 




SALES 




SALES 


ENTIRE YEAR 


PAID ^^^ 


SUBDIVISION 


NUMBER 


($1,000) 


NUMBER 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


EMPLOYEES (3) 


Maryland 


27,727 


2,261,677 


11,085 


2,058,343 


818,257 


177,859 


Allegany 


490 


19,900 


225 


16,808 


4,994 


1,261 


Anne Arundel 


1,747 


114,089 


649 


101,202 


37,573 


6,071 


Baltimore City 


5,920 


599,778 


2,836 


564,143 


197,405 


34,671 


Baltimore 


4,110 


245,796 


1,524 


212,639 


80,810 


14,139 


Calvert 


124 


4,182 


46 


3,393 


1,065 


211 


Caroline 


149 


4,970 


49 


3,596 


1,303 


256 


Carroll 


499 


16,237 


153 


12,153 


3,595 


705 


Cecil 


318 


10,946 


124 


8,670 


2,418 


626 


Charles 


264 


10,349 


99 


8,288 


1,957 


445 


Dorchester 


216 


5,819 


74 


4,472 


1,307 


337 


Frederick 


622 


24,779 


224 


20,340 


6,582 


1,188 


Garrett 


144 


3,499 


47 


2,503 


770 


205 


Harford 


671 


26,786 


265 


21,728 


7,048 


1,554 


Howard 


504 


90,014 


172 


86,093 


46,708 


4,896 


Kent 


145 


4,059 


65 


3,128 


954 


224 


Montgomery 


5,780 


683,246 


2,117 


633,456 


295,611 


30,208 


Prince George's 


3,645 


293,646 


1,397 


267,082 


100,658 


15,347 


Queen Anne's 


100 


2,576 


28 


1,667 


311 


85 


St. Mary's 


222 


7,398 


91 


6,035 


2,141 


498 


Somerset 


112 


1,644 


38 


902 


185 


51 


Talbot 


251 


12,015 


107 


10,400 


3,313 


801 


Washington 


711 


30,036 


283 


25,333 


8,265 


1,727 


Wicomico 


541 


21,620 


204 


17,993 


6,091 


1,223 


Worcester 


442 


28,283 


268 


26,319 


7,193 


1,130 



(1) 



Includes Hotels, Motels, Tourist Courts, Camps; Personal Services; Miscellaneous 
Business Services; Auto Repair, Auto Services, Garages; Miscellaneous Repair Shops; 
Amusement and Recreation Services, including Motion Pictures; Dental Laboratories; 
Legal Services; Architectural, Engineering and Land-Surveying Services. 

See note on previous page concerning comparability of 1967 and 1972 data. 



For week including March 12, 1972. 

irce: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Area Statistics, Maryland, 1972 Census of Selected 
Service Industries. SC 72-A-21. 























w 




















m 




















w 




as 




<r <t 


CO 00 ON 




00 O C3N vD CO 


CO rH vo O r^ 


m 00 CM o 


w 




in 


0^ 


CM in 


O vD r-- 


CSJ rH VO r^ rH 


rH r^ O CO ON 


O CO ON rH <■ 




Q >- 




00 




CJN rH 


OO^O^rH 


rH O" CM VD CM 




CM o <r 


in rH 00 m 


M O 




















< hJ 




r^ 




CO 


r^ r^ 




rH 


r-'o" 




Pm ^j 




r- 


1^ 














P(5 




















^^ 


o 


r^ 


^ 


in so 


vO O 00 


rH o- r^ <r \£) 


r-. vo i^ O CO 


ON CM ON 00 m 


<r CO rH 00 


!ij >^ 


o 




O 


CJN o 




in 00 ON o m 


m o o in v£> 


CO 00 <r ON CM 


o ON <!■ m 




o 




CO 


O ON 


in rH 00 


CO f^ rH CO VO 


NO vo rH <r in 


m NO CM iH rH 


00 ON o sr 


oi w 




















>-i ps; 




00 


<!• 


co" co" 


r^ ON 






<JN ON rH 


rH CO CO CO 


< M 


<ry 






r-\ 


r-\ CN 






cs -sj- 








CO 


CO 




iH 
































(T) 




vD vO 


r-. ON 00 


(^ 00 r-. CO CM 


in <7N 00 1^ ON 


O rH rH in CO 




o 




<r 


vO 


o o 


00 O CO 


o in o o 00 


O rH VD r^ rH 


ON in CM ON r-. 


r- CO cjN >* 


l§ 






LO 


r^ r-l 


O^-J- rH 


rH CO O ON rH 


ON ON o CO r~ 


CO rH o 00 <r 


00 NO rH ON 




00 


in 


oo" .H 


ON >-l CO 


rH in <f 00 CM 


00 rH rH ON rH 


CO CO rH CO 


-d- CM ON CO 


<: rH 








-<3- 


-3- 00 






NO CM 


rH T-^ 






o^ 


o^ 


















<r>- 
















P£5 




^ 


CN 


O vD 


.£> v£) rH 


vC CM O CO O 


ON 00 r^ CM ON 


in ON in CM o 


VO in rH -* 


W 




00 






CO <r CO 


CO rH CTN 00 in 


<j- -d- r-. 00 vr 




r^ rH in o 


s 




O^ 


in 


CM CO 


<r^ON 


r-\ 




o^oo 


CM rH CM 


g 




^ 


r^ 




cvT 






^ 




3 


























CO 


-J- -vT 


<J- Csl NX) 


CONCO-. 


^cMr^cooo 


m <r cjN in vo 


O^CNC 








-^ 


-^ 00 


C^J rH O 




<r 5^ 00 o vo 


o ON 00 in CN 


NO <t 00 ON 


c/2 o 

w o 

1-4 - 




vO^ 




ON r-- 


CM ^D in 


VD rH rH O- r-. 


<r CO ON CO o 


r^ CTN rH ■<)■ 00 


<■ m NO NO 




^ 


CO 


(jC >^ 


r~r ,H CO 


rH r^ in ON CN 


O CM CM O Csl 


C7N O rH <t 


in <r o <r 


<: M 




VO 


^ 


^ 


vD ON 




rH rH rH 






w <0- 










■<t 














i 


-^' 














Pi 






CO 


r^^ 


rH vD ON 


NO (3N CM vD O 


NO CO <r vo r- 


CO vd- CO 00 <r 


r^ CO CO m 


w 










CM in 00 


rH in CO vo r^ 


O CM O ON O 


00 rH NO <r 00 


0^ <■ r- CM 






""--^ 


ON 


•<r ON 




rH CO Cvl rH .H 


<r rH <f rH rH 


(N ON rH 


rH in CO CO 


5 




1-^ 


vO 




in CM 






CM rH 




2 






iH 

ON 




>^ 






tn 








iH 






•H 






00 en 




2 










o 










hJ o 








^3 




u 




>> o (U tn 


c 










>.s 


(U 0) 


(U 


^ 


u <a c 


o u 






X) 


•o 


>-l (-1 


QJ 4-1 




g"^er^ 


4-. O <U 






c 


c 


C t-i 


O O U 


C rH tn en 


•H 4J 13 


bO u 4-1 


H > 




CO 




l5 < 


S B ^ 


•H rH (DO) 


^j +J }-i -o 


as cl 2 


4J d -H CO 


M M 




iH 




00 


•H -H OJ 


rH O rH rH X: 


(U QJ C >-" 


O -rl e CU 


hJ O 




>, 


^ 


(U (U 


u u > 


O ^^ -H Vj O 


X) >-l l4-{ CO 4-1 


4-1 C (U (U 


^ jr o cj 


O « 

pu b 








r-{ r-\ r-\ 


u u o <a u 


cii u u "» C 


c -H <u • e 


rH en O >H 




1 


CO 


31 


CO CO CO 


CO CO (U ^ O 


J-i CO CO O 0) 


O )-i 3 4-) O 


CO CO -H O 






s 


pq PQ O 


O U (J u o 


fa O pel K t^ 


S PM O-CO W 


H s :2 s 



NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS, BY SELECTED KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUPS 
MARYLAND SELECTED SERVICES 
BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1972 









SELECTED 


KIND-OF-BUSINESS GROUPS 






HOTELS , 


AUTO 




AMUSEMENT 






MOTELS, 


REPAIR, 


MISCEL- 


& RECREATION 






TOURIST 


AUTO 


LANEOUS 


SERVICES 




POLITICAL 


COURTS, 


SERVICES, 


REPAIR 


INCLUDING 


LEGAL 


SUBDIVISION 


CAMPS 


GARAGES 


SERVICES 


MOTION PICTURES 


SERVICES 


Maryland 


635 


2,269 


2,320 


2,911 


3,146 


Allegany 


26 


56 


37 


41 


28 


Anne Arundel 


30 


138 


186 


214 


149 


Baltimore City 


48 


522 


423 


435 


1,026 


Baltimore 


69 


299 


340 


501 


527 


Calvert 


10 


7 


14 


21 


10 


Caroline 


2 


24 


24 


8 


12 


Carroll 


13 


72 


66 


60 


21 


Cecil 


29 


44 


42 


37 


20 


Charles 


16 


32 


29 


32 


19 


Dorchester 


6 


27 


25 


21 


15 


Frederick 


21 


65 


83 


82 


35 


Garrett 


22 


19 


11 


18 


8 


Harford 


28 


77 


86 


68 


59 


Howard 


18 


30 


33 


60 


49 


Kent 


10 


15 


18 


16 


11 


Montgomery 


43 


263 


322 


550 


700 


Prince George's 


50 


313 


327 


471 


311 


Queen Anne ' s 


7 


12 


8 


11 


11 


St. Mary's 


9 


30 


20 


34 


13 


Somerset 


3 


15 


14 


10 


7 


Talbot 


7 


27 


34 


23 


22 


Washington 


25 


91 


84 


72 


37 


Wicomico 


16 


66 


70 


47 


32 


Worcester 


127 


25 


24 


79 


24 


Source: U. S. Bureau of the 


Census, Area 


Statistics, 


Maryland, 1972 Census of 


Selected 


Service Industries, SC 


72-A21. 







w a. 



en H 



o w 
Pi S 
o o 



O M 



in 


PQ 


H 


HD 


;2: 


CO 


w 






^ 


CO 


O 


1— 1 


M 


hJ 


H 


^ 


1— 1 


H 




Vk 


PM 



O Pi 




2 


CO 












w w 






w 












H W 




>-' 


o 


<r 




vO 










w 


M 


^ 


0^ 




00 




2d M 


Q 


> 


> 








r-l 




o o 




ptj 


Pi 












c^ 2; 


:d 


w 












< w 


h4 


CO 


CO 














J 




CO 


C30 


ON 


\D 


r^ 


^ 






1 


w 




<r 






CM 






Pi 


CJ 






o 








W 


tl 
















hJ 


CO 


> 






rH 










^ 


w 














H 


o 










00 


1 




3 


PQ 


Pi 




--< 


-<r 













W CO 




Pi 




CJ w 








M O 


O 


<: 


O 


> <3 
Pi Pi 


g 


Ph 


H 


w 


t3 


w <: 


<d 


Pi 

1 


<: 

CO 


CO o 

CO CO 
CO w 




hJ 


1=1 


w u 




W 


o 


Z M 




o 


w 


M > 




CO 




CO pi 






^ w 




s 




PQ CO 
hJ CO 

Is 

w w 

Ph CO 


„ 


^ 


H 


^ 




CO 


CO 




hJ 


h4 




H CO 


w 


W 


Pi 


Pi fe 




H 


;=> 


^ S 


§ 


s 


g 


8^ 



^2 

U CO 



cNi 00 cjN in CM 



fO \£) 1— I <f 



r^ vo c^ o ^ 

ro 00 cN <r vD 

iH -^ en 



vO 00 CSJ CJN C 

m en cN ON r 
I— I m cN 



^ vD CN CJN VO 



iH O e^ og vO 
CN rH o in 00 

CN in -H CN tH 



^ O 00 ON fn 



00 cNi iH <r o 

,H CN r^ O 00 
CO v£> vD lTi r^ 





q; cj> 






>, 


S 2i 


cu 
u 




c 




o 




CO 


<: 6 


e 


rH 


OC 




•H 


o 


(U 


0) 4.) 




t-l 




c ^ 




u 


< 


^^ 


CO 
PQ 


6 



O QJ >-i 15 C 
<U >-i CO O o 
O P^ ffi K S 



M CJ +J 


Igco 


(1) C -H cn 




o -H e 0) 


Pi kJ § 


c jd o o 


•H CO O >-i 


»-i CO -H O 

cu 12 :2 :2 


g^ 



g2 

p:^ W W M 

W CO Oi > 

W p U Pi 

H S W W 

O < Pi CD 



^J P Pi o 

W O i-i M 

u w < > 

CO z Ph pi 



W CO 














Pi o w 


a^ 




ON o m r-- M 


CN iH vO ON OJ 


o o CN r-~ cni 


M vO 00 vO o 


M MO 


vo 


ON 


in ON ON ON <H 


cNj in CO M CM 


in csi in csi M 


in 00 MM 


o < o > <d 

H Ph H Pi Pi 

fc) w p pj <: 




r-^ 


































<: Pi < c/5 o 















I c/:i CO tq 

hJ P w u 

W O 2 M 



O M 



Pi Pi 
w w 

P-i CO 



hJ o 

< M 

O CO 

M M 

H > 

M M 

hJ Q 

gg 

CO 



J O O 00 
J o in M 

^ -^ CM 



CO in in ^ o 



vO <J" CO O "X) 



in in r^ <r cNj I 



CM o o 00 r-- 



o in in ON ON 



hJ J M H CO 


bO 


M 


M ON 00 eg M 


csi <r vo cN CNj 


in CO in 


W W Pi Pi P-i 


CO 


O 


CO CO vo r^ M 


M CNJ Csl 




O O O O ^ 


v£) 


r^ 



















JOO-^vOvO OOvDt^O 



ca < E e >-i Mr 



u 


o 

0) 


0) w 

c - 




u 


CJ 


^ ^ 


(U 



(U M O r 



O )-i -H >-. O 



^^. 



0) }-i >-i 15 C 
U ^ ai O Qi 
Pm CJ5 W X W 



0) 43 ^ O 



-139- 



PERSONAL INCOME 

Maryland's personal income rose in 1976 to $28,514,000,000, an increase 
of over 58 per cent from 19 71. The total personal income of the State represents 
2.1 per cent of the total personal income' of the United States, the same as the 
2.1 per cent in 1971. 

Per capita income in Maryland rose to $6,880 in 1976, up 53 per cent from 
1971. This figure placed the State tenth in the nation in this category. 

In average per household effective buying income in 1976, Maryland ranked 
second among the mideast states with a level of $17,591. As might be expected, 
the metropolitan areas were the leaders, with suburban Washington's Montgomery 
County having the highest average disposable income ($24,443) of any county in 
the United States. Baltimore, Howard, Prince George's and Charles Counties 
each have disposable income figures in excess of $19,000 per household, while 
at the other end of the scale, Garrett, Caroline, Allegany and Dorchester 
Counties all have levels of approximately $11,000 or less. 

The Gross State Product for Maryland is estimated to have risen in 
current dollars, to $31.1 billion, an increase of 54 per cent above the level 
of 1971. The Gross State Product concept is roughly equivalent to the national 
level Gross National Product, i.e., the State output of goods and services 
valued at market price. 



NO. 94 
GROSS STATE PRODUCT, MARYLAND, CURRENT AND CONSTANT DOLLARS: 1950-1976 



CURRENT DOLLARS CONSTANT DOLLARS (1967 DOLLARS) 

($1,000,000,000) ($1,000,000,000) 



1976 $31.1 $18.9 

1975 28.8 18.4 

1974 26.7 18.4 

1973 24.8 18.9 

1972 22.4 17.9 

1971 20.2 16.7 

1970 18.7 16.3 

1969 17.3 16.0 

1968 16.0 15.3 

1967 14.6 14.6 

1966 13.5 14.1 

1965 12.1 13.1 

1964 11.0 12.1 

1963 10.0 11.2 

1962 9.2 10.6 

1961 8.5 9.8 

1960 8.1 9.4 

1959 7.8 9.3 

1958 7.3 8.8 

1957 7.1 8.8 

1956 6.8 8.7 

1955 6.2 8.4 

1954 5.6 7.7 

1953 5.5 7.5 

1952 5.2 7.2 

1951 4.8 7.0 

1950 4.2 6.5 



Source: Maryland Department of Economic and Community Development. 



H Oi 
< O 





^ 




00 


CTn 


o 




rH 




ro 


<r in 




v£) 




00 


<3^ O 








CO 


<r in 


vD 




00 


CJN o 




^ 






























fO <j- 




<r 


<r 


<J- 


<r -cr 


<r 


<a- 


<r 


-d" in 


in 


w 




















































s 




















































o 




















































u 




















































2 ^ 




















































M O 


ro 


00 




CN 


o 




vO 


CO 


00 


-H o 




O 




00 


vO .-1 






CN 




00 CO 




CJN 


t-\ 


CN CO 




o 




00 




^ 


00 




vO 


vD 


o 


<r in 








C7N 


vo <r 




VO 


<r 


00 


vO oo 


(JN 


r^ 


vO 


rH C7N 




J o 


vD 


r^ 


0^ 


vD 






iH 


vO 


<f 


ON <r 










00 r-. 




MD 


CTN 


>o 




o 


C7N 


r-- 


in in 


in 


<: - 




















































2 o 


v£) 


m 


-d- 


<t 


<r 




fO 


O 


O 


CTN ON 




vD 


vD 


VO 


in in 






<r 


>d- 


<d- ^r 


vr 


CO 


CO 


CO CN 


CN 


o o 


'"' 


<-\ 




--I 






r-( 






































00 o 




















































Pi - 




















































W ,-H 




















































PL, </> 








































































































:^ 




















































H 




















































O 


































CO 


















H 








03 












03 














1 

rH 
O 

o 


(U 
















Z 






























XI 






5-1 










CO 


03 




o 




















C 










c 
















w 






hJ M 








O 








PL 















03 




O 


x; 










O 


o 




< H 








U 








a 




"ao 










I— 1 






CO 










;si{ j«! 




U CJ 


O 


m 




03 








•H 


CO 


S-i 0! 










CO 






pi- 






(U 




03 


03 






T3 


6 




U 






03 


CO 


03 


•H ^ 






>< 








O 


B 




03 






Q 


o ta 




H Q 


CO 


o 


CO 




c 




C 


CO 


CO 


> CO 






OJ 








•H 


03 




03 C 


03 


03 




d 


d 






X 


03 


X 


o 




o 


•H 


C 


03 






s 


•H 


CU QJ 




l-i 


ffi 


o 


T3 03 


S 


^ 


x: 


XI "H 


o 


hJ m 


O 


03 


w 




60 






to 


03 


•W !j 




j:^ 




03 


T3 C 








^ 


03 -U 


03 


CD 




w e 


B 


O ^ 






C 


3 


0) 




•H 


CO 


^ 


CO J3 




03 


s 


s 


O -H 




Cfl 


& 


03 


> C 




OS 




3 O 


5-1 


PL, P 


O 


^ 


OJ 


O 


M 




>-i 


•H 


5-1 


0) CD 






cu 


03 


S^ 






0) 


XI 


QJ o 


(U 


rH 


o 


55- 


(U 


'-^ 


O 


O 


^i 


CO 


o 




< 




< 


12 S 




13 


2 


PC 




o 


Z 




2 s 


Q 


<: 


2; 


> 


. 










o-i 


-<r 


in 




VO 


r^ 00 


<J> 


o 




.H 


CM CO 


■<r 


in 




vO 


r^ 00 


ON O 






CN CO -3- in 


1 




























^ 


rH t— 1 




r-i 




rH 


rH rH 


rH CN 




CM 


CM CM 


Cvl CM 


w 




































































































































































































































































Z ^-^ 




















































M O 








in 




^ 










o 






O 


00 >-l 


-^ 


<T 




O 


VO CTv 


in ON 




VO 


Csl <!■ 


CJN CO 


O 






0^ 


(M 


O 


en 


00 




<r 


00 in 


CJN 






a\ 


O CM 




O^ 




C3> 


r^ vo 


rH CM 




O 


vO rH 


CO CM 


hJ o 
2 O 


"1 




00 


ON 


in 


<r 






in 




vO 


CN 




<3N 


as 00 


in 


<t 




rH 


in in 


in C3N 




vO 




<!• ON 


ro 




ro 


>«D 


CnT 


r^" 


vO 




00 


rH <r 


O 


00 




CM 


.H a\ 


oo' 


00 




00 


r- <!• 


<f CN 




CM 


O 00 


oo^rC 


o o 






in 




00 


r^ 






vO 


vo in 


Ln 


















Csl CN 






eg 


CN rH 


r-i rH 


CO o 






nH 














































ai '• 




















































W rH 




















































PL, -CO- 


</> 






































































































hJ 




















































< 






























































































































































03 






















CO 






03 
C 




































0! 




































































r-l 






















hJ m 


r3 




OJ 








c 






>. 




(U 






o 










d 


3 










< H 














03 






0) 




CO 














d 


o 


03 CJ 




CU 


03 




O U 


w 




C 


^ 






> 






C CO 




3 






03 03 


Q 






•H 


•u 


4-1 -H 




0) 


d 


>~, 










)-, 












03 K 


03 


X 




03 


•H U 


% 


u 






03 &0 


o -u 




CO 


03 2 


M 


H Q 


HD 




o 


O 


o 




>. 






ao cu 


XI 


o 




c 


C 


3 




c 


•H C 


en o 




CO 


•H B 


O 


M CO 


a> 






>-i 


c 


CO 


m 






•H 1-5 




05 




03 


•H x; 




O 




o 


00 -H 


QJ CU 




0) 


CO 03 


3 


hJ m 












03 


C 




o 


^ 


Vj 


CO 




•H 


00 W 


>-' 






u 


U X 


c d 




d 


•H XI 


4-) 03 


O Pi 








s 


-H 


X 


c 






CJ S 


o 


CO 




T3 


M U 


Pi 


CO 




CO 


O CO 


d d 




d 


3 03 


d S 


Pu :3 


a 




0) 


S 




OJ 


S 




J2 


•H S 




^ 




c 


•H O 


^ 


•H 




•H 


OJ 03 






a; 


O rH 


<D O 


»-) 




u 


2 


M 


H 


Oh 




O 


S 2 


pL, 






> 3 


S 




S 


o s 


S cS 




H 


hJ <: 


:^ M 



-142- 



vo r~« 00 ON o 



• vooo rovooi — o^ 
(0OCNI.H vo>d■o^Ooo 






O 00 O CO r-l 

■<r ^ vo m rH 

vo in <r «* <r 

U-| in LTl lO LO 



in ON v£) ~* o 
o I — vD vo in 

^ CO OO CO CO 



cN r- o v£> <!■ 
(N <r cNi o CO 



•H O )-i a! O 



CU O O >H >-i 



iHcsico^m vor^oooNO 



u o ^ 

W M 



inr^iHvOi^ cNiiHOOON 
.— i^Doom-d- vomoocorH 
<rocococo .HrHooo 



O CN -cr CN 00 

00 D m <r 00 
00 oo r-« vo in 



OnOOncMtH iHTHinCNJi 

vO-*COtH<f COv£><fCM< 

-*<f~cr<l-CO COCNICslCNC 









J -H <U O O 



<J O Z O M 



o -H rt o 



•^ c 60 c a 

hJ -H -H -H CO 

>H 42 j= e w 



:SSI ^:lg:r^ 



OCObO TSbOcd'H 



U5 O PLH O > 



S O M ► 



TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME, 



MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES: 
1976 AND 1971 







TOTAL PERSONAL 


INCOME 








1976 


1971 


PER CENT CHANGE 


STATE 


($1 


,000,000) 


($1,000,000) 


1971/1976 


United States 


$1 


,373,511 


$851,952 


61.2 


Mideast 










MARYLAND 




28,514 


17,999 


58.4 


New York 




126,925 


89,535 


41.8 


New Jersey 




54,152 


36,123 


49.9 


Pennsylvania 




76,385 


48,474 


57.6 


Delaware 




4,092 


2,649 


54.5 


District of Columbia 




5,662 


3,862 


46.6 


Southeast 










Virginia 




31,908 


18,867 


69.1 


West Virginia 




9,941 


5,773 


72.2 


North Carolina 




29,821 


17,724 


68.3 


South Carolina 




14,662 


8,369 


75.2 


Georgia 




27,576 


16,613 


66.0 


Florida 




50,690 


28,327 


78.9 


Mississippi 




10,663 


6,220 


71.4 


Kentucky 




18,439 


10,710 


72.2 


Tennessee 




22,606 


13,312 


69.8 


Alabama 




18,714 


10,893 


71.8 


Maryland as Per Cent 




2.1 


2.1 




of U. S. 











State Personal Income received by State residents from all sources during 
any calendar year. Excludes wages and salaries received by federal military 
and civilian employees temporarily stationed abroad. 

: U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Survey of 
Current Business , August 1977. 



-144- 



NO. 98= 



PER CAPITA INCOME, MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN 
STATES: 1976 AND 1971 



PER CAPITA INCOME 
1976 1971 
($) ($) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1971/1976 



RANK IN NATION 
BASED ON 1976 
INCOME 



United States 



$6,399 



$4,132 



Mideast 








MARYLAND 


6,880 


4,493 


53.1 


New York 


7,019 


4,863 


44.3 


New Jersey 


7,381 


4,959 


48.8 


Pennsylvania 


6,439 


4,085 


57.6 


Delaware 


7,030 


4,727 


48.7 


District of Columbia 


8,067 


5,140 


56.9 


Southeast 








Virginia 


6,341 


4,000 


58.5 


West Virginia 


5,460 


3,284 


66.3 


North Carolina 


5,453 


3,434 


58.8 


South Carolina 


5,147 


3,164 


62.7 


Georgia 


5,548 


3,549 


56.3 


Florida 


6,020 


4,005 


50.3 


Mississippi 


4,529 


2,772 


63.4 


Kentucky 


5,379 


3,268 


64.6 


Tennessee 


5,364 


3,340 


60.6 


Alabama 


5,106 


3,131 


63.1 



10 
3 

18 
9 
2 



20 
38 
39 
47 
37 
29 
51 
42 
44 
49 



Maryland as Per Cent of U.S. 107.5 



State Personal Income is income received by State residents from all sources 
during any calendar year. Excludes wages and salaries received by federal 
military and civilian employees temporarily stationed abroad. 



U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Survey of Current 
Business , August 1977. 



o o w 

Pi Prf o 

w w u 

Ph PL| S 



> CM O ro O 00 CX) r 
J 00 o 00 <T> r^ r^ 



« 3 00 O 0) < 



J 3 < 



: pii o 

< PL, g 



a^ o <f <r o -^ 



O 00 o o <t ' 



^^ 



H O <• O rH vC 



(1) rH -U C 



a ^-^ 



3 a e <u CO 
^ n) 4-1 (-1 jj 
•H tH CO <u c 



Ph ex >i o CI 



CO o M ->^ 

- ^ o S 

) T) CO j_i Ci 

5 C M (U Cd 

1 t-i ^ C c 

QJ 0) P- CO O 

H 00 x; o fn 2 

J 5 O PL, 



00 00 t3 M C 



3 3 C -H CO CO > 

: c to o 4-1 c H ' 

) CO (-1 x: dj -H q; 

> S H 3 Pi P^ c/2 P 



CO 


O CO 


c 


c c 


0) 




c 


CO 


0) 0) 






0) o 






CO 


o 




3 


•H -H 


C 


XI 




CO 


CD > 


CO 


CO 


rH QJ 




(U -H 






O-Pw 


•H 


»i Q 


H 



pL, Ph PL, PL, 



C rH O- CO 



C C 4J o 



XI 


,ft 


x: 


o 




















QJ 


Ck- 


a) 


<u 


CO 




S 



O Pi 



H 


pLi 


o 


O 


m 




Pi 


en 


w 


1^ 


PL, 


C3 






h-4 


hJ 


< 


hJ 



W H in 
2: 13 < r- 
<^ M H CT> 



■ CN f^ O ro 

■ vO M3 0^ O 



rH r-t ^D <r O 
ON <Ti <r CM CO 
ro ON r-^ c^ iH 



00 ON CO O ON 
^ v£> <r CM lO 
CM O CN r-. 



1— I 00 c*^ ro ON 



^ CM o- ro ro 



<f in in vx> -d- 



vD ON -d" ro r^ 



<t C3N CM in - 

ON ON •<r rH c 



■lOOONfOOO ^CTNOOmiH 

-onoovocjn rncMOrocjN 
■> r^ vo CM <r I— I CM 



c7N<rintH<r ooocj^moo 
vorooo<fON o^TtHinin 



CO <t O r-\ \o 



vo <r o CM r^ 



<r 00 <r <r 

00 r~! 00 r-H 

^ ^ vO 00 



in <r o vo 
vo ON m in 
rH in fo iH 



00 -d- ^ ^ 
ON in C7N 00 



in in CM CJN 



inOiHr^cM oomcTNinc^ 

CTnvOONCMCM vDONCM^fC^ 

rHinr^vc-j- ONiHoooooN 

inin<rinin m-vrm^in 



iHinooOcM csiCTNOOroc 
^<j-ctncmoo r^cotH<rc 
<r<r<rOiH mcMr^cMi 



CO r-^ f^ CM ^ 
00 CM ON o o 
CM in CO r^ r^ 



o rH <r cjN -<r 

CM in 00 CM 00 

r^ 00 CO ON <>o 



vO CO CO t^ 

<t in in 00 
o in in in 



rH ^ 00 r~- 
vO CO CO CO 
rH <]■ VD in 



CM CO CO >* CM 



1 CO CO CO CO 



^ 




o 






PS 


>.S 


(U 


0) 




^ 


)-l 


1-1 




^^ 


H 


^ 


4-1 


^. 








(1) 


0) 0) 






> 


H 


iH C 


rH 


rH 




8 


^^ 


« 


CO 


CO 



>^ o 0) m 
M tu a - 



4-1 4J C (U 



>-i m CO o <u 

Pm O ffi W t^ 



-147- 



NO. 101 



EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME 
RANK ORDER FOR STATES: 1976 



($1,000) 



($1,000) 



California 

New York 

Illinois 

Pennsylvania 

Texas 

Ohio 

Michigan 

New Jersey 

Florida 

Massachusetts 

Indiana 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

Missouri 

Wisconsin 

MARYLAND 

Georgia 

Minnesota 

Connecticut 

Washington 

Tennessee 

Louisiana 

Iowa 

Alabama 

Kentucky 

Colorado 



130,815,695 


Oklahoma 


13,171,752 


108,618,767 


Kansas 


12,996,855 


71,093,574 


South Carolina 


12,419,798 


66,039,063 


Oregon 


12,371,153 


65,292,464 


Arizona 


11,299,814 


58,300,116 


Mississippi 


9,225,537 


53,518,559 


Arkansas 


9,024,371 


46,477,783 


Nebraska 


8,487,441 


44,177,944 


West Virginia 


8,111,730 


33,047,151 


Utah 


5,591,599 


27,955,112 


Rhode Island 


5,103,093 


26,787,940 


Hawaii 


5,086,971 


26,183,913 


New Mexico 


5,071,025 


24,576,428 


Maine 


4,999,586 


24,236,742 


Washington, D. C. 


4,979,975 


24,030,843 


New Hampshire 


4,218,529 


23,594,852 


Idaho 


4,064,056 


21,203,042 


Montana 


3,723,758 


20,298,372 


Nevada 


3,694,684 


20,229,292 


North Dakota 


3,528,320 


19,724,204 


Delaware 


3,387,073 


17,600,651 


South Dakota 


3,207,356 


15,927,536 


Alaska 


3,190,788 


15,761,907 


Vermont 


2,167,986 


15,688,362 


Wyoming 


2,073,245 


13,862,971 







National Net Effective Buying Income is $1,176,239,778,000. 



Source: (C) 1977, S&MM Survey of Buying Power ; further reproduction is forbidden. 



-148- 



NO. 102 



BUYING POWER, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: 1976 



MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD EFFECTIVE 

BUYING INCOIffi, BY 

POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1976 



SUBDIVISION 



PERCENTAGE OF 
USA TOTAL 



MEDIAN INCOME FOR HOUSEHOLDS 
IN DOLLARS 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

MARYLAND 



.0383 
.1586 
.3816 
.3015 
.0126 
.0102 
.0391 
.0259 
.0285 
.0136 
.0454 
.0109 
.0635 
.0489 
.0079 
.2724 
.3161 
.0095 
.0238 
.0089 
.0123 
.0504 
.0275 
.0126 
1.9200 



9,889 
15,522 
11,450 
17,831 
11,797 

9,151 
14,062 
13,389 
17,723 

9,408 
13,903 

9,068 
15,258 
18,935 

9,570 
22,012 
17,834 
12,719 
12,994 

7,222 
11,383 
12,290 
i:.,158 
10,310 
15,494 



Source: (C) 1977, S&MM Survey of Buying Power ; further reproduction is forbidden. 



-149- 



NO. lOA 



ESTIMATED PER CAPITA AND AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME BY 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION, RANKED BY PER CAPITA EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME: 1976 





PER CAPITA 




AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD 






EFFECTIVE BUYING 




EFFECTIVE BUYING 




POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 


INCOME 


RANK 


INCOME 


RANK 


United States 


$5,449 




$15,895 




Maryland 


5,797 




17,591 




Baltimore Metropolitan Area(l) 


5,447 




16,520 




Montgomery 


8,100 


1 


24,443 


1 


Baltimore 


6,576 


2 


20,097 


3 


Prince George's 


6,214 


3 


19,166 


4 


Howard 


6,119 


4 


20,280 


2 


Talbot 


5,460 


5 


14,614 


13 


Charles 


5,367 


6 


19,141 


5 


Harford 


5,346 


7 


17,380 


6 


Queen Anne's 


5,254 


8 


15,033 


12 


Anne Arundel 


5,146 


9 


17,200 


7 


Frederick 


4,983 


10 


15,308 


10 


Wicomico 


4,885 


11 


13,861 


14 


Carroll 


4,787 


12 


15,190 


11 


Cecil 


4,722 


13 


15,806 


9 


Washington 


4,688 


14 


13,543 


15 


Baltimore City 


4,679 


15 


13,248 


17 


St. Mary's 


4,562 


16 


16,141 


8 


Worcester 


4,333 


17 


12,322 


18 


Kent 


4,149 


18 


11,826 


19 


Dorchester 


3,987 


19 


10,984 


21 


Calvert 


3,986 


20 


13,336 


16 


Allegany 


3,914 


21 


10,695 


22 


Somerset 


3,890 


22 


11,206 


20 


Caroline 


3,774 


23 


10,510 


24 


Garrett 


3,454 


24 


10,587 


23 



Note: Net disposable income as estimated by Sales Management is net of taxes, and 
therefore, differs from per capita personal income figures as estimated by 
U. S. Department of Commerce. 

^-'-^ Baltimore City, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, and Howard Counties. 

Source: (C) 197 7, S&MM Survey of Buying Power ; further reproduction is forbidden. 



-^ 



O C3^ 

O cr> 



O ON 
O ON 
O ON 



O ON 
O ON 
O ON 



Pi o 

w o 

Q O 



w 


hj 


PQ 




t 


1 


^ 


1 


w 


O) 




u 


> 


;=> 


H 


S3 


<: 


o 


CJ 






PC 


w 





CM O ON ON .—t 

ON r^ <N -d- r^ 



I rH <r 00 C^ O ON r- 
I O CM O ON I— 1 O ON 



00 .-H 00 vD ( 
CN O CO CM ( 



CM 00 vD C 
O CJN r^ r 



00 CO CJN ON o 

\o r^ lo vo r^ 



cooooNiHv£)ooo<r<r 
oovDoo\£>r^cn.HvOin<r 



ooor^oocofOiHONvoco 
oor--oooooooNOor-^cooo 



ooLncMcgcoovOLDONin 



rH ON CN LD CO 


cjNvDcOvjcoooor^min 


ON 00 r-. rH VO 


oo-<rr^cM-d-ocor--c3Nr^ 


in r^ 00 CN CM 


rHO<roNiooo<rr^voo 



r^ vo 00 vo r 



vO CO -J- CO <)■ CO c 



■u J i 



(U 00 J-l ^-1 -u l-i (-< 

JC J-< CO v-i 3 o o 

•U -H 0) O O (U .H ' 

3 > :2 ^ W O Pj:^ 



-151- 



RETAIL SALES PER HOUSEHOLD 
RANK ORDER FOR STATES: 1976 



Alaska 

Hawaii 

New Hampshire 

Nevada 

Delaware 

Utah 

Texas 

Illinois 

Colorado 

Florida 

Arizona 

Ve rmon t 

Indiana 

Connecticut 

MARYLAND 

Michigan 

Georgia 

New Mexico 

New Jersey 

Wisconsin 

Massachusetts 

California 

Ohio 

Wyoming 

Minnesota 

Tennessee 



(IN DOLLARS 




(IN DOLLARS 


PER HOUSEHOLD) 


STATES 


PER HOUSEHOLD) 


14,639 


Washington 


8,846 


10,996 


Virginia 


8,789 


10,568 


Maine 


8,774 


10,392 


Kansas 


8,715 


10,315 


Rhode Island 


8,643 


10,066 


Pennsylvania 


8,640 


9,878 


North Dakota 


8,592 


9,771 


Missouri 


8,578 


9,762 


Idaho 


8,554 


9,698 


Louisiana 


8,513 


9,624 


Nebraska 


8,493 


9,486 


Oregon 


8,492 


9,445 


Alabama 


8,434 


9,385 


Montana 


8,426 


9,378 


South Carolina 


8,418 


9,369 


Oklahoma 


8,343 


9,341 


North Carolina 


8,340 


9,302 


Mississippi 


8,208 


9,209 


Iowa 


8,068 


9,167 


Arkansas 


8,009 


9,150 


Kentucky 


7,990 


9,114 


West Virginia 


7,715 


9,013 


New York 


7,593 


8,955 


South Dakota 


7,382 


8,900 


District of Columbia 


7,004 


8,852 







Source: (C) 1977, S&MM Survey of Buying Power ; further reproduction is forbidden. 



> H O 
Pi < O 
W H -oo- 



■<roo^oa>c^rH,HrH 
^lncoooO'^cNCT^mo^^o<^■m^--^^ 



I ro <r a^ r-- 00 - 



CX) 00 On 00 



00CN10^^0^^•<rO<}•^^lmvi^^I— IO^^O^£)000000-)l— I-^lD'— I 

oovoeTiinmoomr^rHCTiOOr^oo.— loor^r-^ONv^J'^f^r^MDO 
lna^ooo^^£)^-^|— lO-OvO-— l,^cNO^^Ln-d•ooo^^~>.— i^r^rvi 



LO O r-l LO O ON - 
f^ O CM t-l r-l ( 

CM CO <!• 



CT\ <Ti <T> CJN I 



00<— IO00rH<fCNCNimi 

o<roo<rCTNCTNcr>mr^L 
ininvDincTirHinoOiHc 

>— I^.HCNtHCN0OCO<rc 



lCOoococor^cN^^oo<d•0^c^IG^<rL 
ir^ONOor^cor^LTicD'— Income 
iu-icNOOO<roor^Ln\Ovo<rcMc 

socoi— loOr-icoaN intHvd-m'— ir 



cov£)<d-<t'Hoo^CTNv£)tH<rcofO,— ir^ooO"— ir^oooNco.— tr 
r^ON-nr-^CNiooNCsioOi— ivor^ONCOiHr^co-cT'H.Hco-j-.Hc 
OoocooNvocsiO-croocvjoJO'— ii— ir--r^i— ir^i— ir^LOv£)vDv 



J - wo 
J Z en o 



r in 1^ >— t CO o vD -d" ' 



cNco-j-u-iinOirior^OvOcooo-__, __, 

ovo<rm<rr->-d-OiHmogr^r^fOcNcot— loor^^coojincNi 
<j-r--cnr^r^r^<j-cM<rr\iooomr^cN)oo<rr^mr^cNia>Lnr 

C~J f^ vX) CTn 1— I I- 
<r .H CO CM 
CM CO -J- 



o o 

Pi o 



■LnOvooNLncMiHvoi — iHcocmocmv^jococo-^cocoo- 
icM^fi— iooco<rooNuov£)mcov£!ocM<roocOrHCMOoin 

-v£)CMr^COCOr~CMv£)COCMiHCTvC7N<l"COOOLnOr^O^<r 



Q O 

o o 
o o 



>— lOCTNO-cfCTioOiHr^cMOONCocoromOLncjNvDOcricyNO 
cx)r^Lnr^<J-cooooocTNO^t^iHr~-vd-oooaNOvD-3-o<3'-3- 
m<rr^crvLnvocMu->csjtn<d-ooocr>oor^'^oooc3>-d-ocovo 



oocjNi— i^oo-j-cMOcoLn~j-vooo<rcri^oo-j-vouoo>cM<fcM 
oOiHomi^ocTNLnvor~^-«d-r^o^o<ror^in\or^moO\o 
oovovocjNrviiHfOcTivooocMr^<T\aN-d--<r^<riHinr^OcM 

ONiHr^i— ir^inf^oOiHoocTvoooor^r^i— ii— ivDooiniHooco^r 



\D o 
00 <j- 
r-i <r 



vDoor^oooinincocxDvOLOO^OrHcooCTNOv 
mcjNCMCMr^rHcMrsior^cMOOC3>mooo- 
^<rvom'— icMONinooinoOi— locooi— icMiH- 



r^r^<rcoLn<r<3-ooc7NCMONOOoocMaNmr^'HOvCLnOr 
vocMooc3Nvo<rc7NcocT\CTN.— iv£)r^^o-<tr^vDincocoi— i<rc 

CMrHCMCO ^^,—1 rO COCM iHO" r-A MCOC 



C ^^ O O 4-1 

nj < g e M • 



cu 



^ ^^ 



•H iH 
, - _ iH O r 

Q) tU -U 4-1 > p VJ • 



I -ri U O TS U ^ 



. . QJ (-1 >-i S C 

(U^OJ-icdcooo; 





W) 


CO 


















o 


0) 


CO 


ai 


o 


cu 




^ 


C^] 


M 


CJ 


ri 




4-1 


c 


0) 




dJ 


r: 


•H 


<u 




H 




M 


3 


•u 


o 



-153- 



NO. 107 

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS BY HIGHEST ^^^ AND LOWEST^^) income 
GROUP FOR THE UNITED STATES, MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES: 



STATE 





UNDER 


TOTAL 


$8,000 


(1,000) 


(1,000) 


74,002.4 


20,497.2 


1,366.1 


287.0 


196.2 


43.6 


2,462.8 


488.0 


6,469.7 


1,666.6 


4,072.8 


996.7 



NUI'ffiER OF FAMILIES 
WITH HOUSEHOLD INCOME 
OVER 
$15,000 
(1,000) 



HIGHEST INCOME 
HOUSEHOLDS AS 
PER CENT OF 
LOWEST 



United States 
MARYLAND 
Delaware 
New Jersey 
New York 
Pennsylvania 



33,366.8 

711.2 

98.9 

1,396.1 

3,047.5 

1,933.2 



162.8 
247.8 
226.8 
286.1 
182.9 
194.0 



(1) 



Over $15,000. 



^^^Under $8,000. 

Source: (C) 1977, S&MM Survey of Buying Power ; further reproduction is forbidden. 



NO. 108 



FAMILIES BELOW POVERTY LINE IN MARYLAND 
BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1969 



NUMBER OF FAMILIES 
SUBDIVISION BELOW POVERTY LEVEL 



Allegany 2,576 

Anne Arundel 4,033 

Baltimore City 30,178 

Baltimore 5,610 

Calvert 706 

Caroline 852 

Carroll 1,093 

Cecil 1,053 

Charles 1,053 

Dorchester 1,137 

Frederick " 1,489 

Garrett 1,223 

Harford 1,734 

Howard 634 

Kent 531 

Montgomery 4,011 

Prince George's 7,031 

Queen Anne's 747 

St. Mary's 1,457 

Somerset 1,188 

Talbot 801 

Washington 2,544 

Wicomico 1,841 

Worcester 1,079 

MARYLAND 74,601 

Note on the Poverty Level: 

The poverty level is a designation used by the federal government as one means 
of identifying areas and persons with income levels so low that some economic 
hardship is likely to be present. Various levels have been determined depending 
on family size, sex of family head, number of children and type of residence. 
The poverty level threshold averages about $3,750 on a national basis. The data 
for families below the poverty level have several limitations — for instance the 
poverty levels are not adjusted for state or local variation in costs of living, 
but are satisfactory for giving a general picture of the existence and location of 
low income. 

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Population 1970, General Social and 
Economic Characteristics , Final Report PC (1) C22, Maryland. 



■ in <r 



1 O 0-) 

r ro 00 



vO CNl 00 
LO CM -^ 

00 00 fO 



r^ o <r 

iH vO vD 

a^ CO ro 



^ o 



r-^ m <D 
csi r- CN 

rH CO >H 



vD in 1-^ 

CM CM ,H 



LO r- CM 

r-l O C^ 
vO O CO 





\D 00 


O O CM 
LO -H CM 

<r o 00 




rH CO 


vD 00 O 


00 


vO CO 


<r CO in 

00 ON o 



CO ON iH r-^ 



o> o 00 


CNl 


o r^ in 


in in ON 


00 


r^ CNl 00 


CO CNJ 00 


-<r 


ON in in 


Cvl CM 00 


ON 


m 00 -<r 


-H CN 


in 


CO vO 




CO 


-H 00 in 



l^^ M^t 



-156- 






<r .H O 
r^ CN r^ 
O 0^ f^ 



CM vD iri 


00 00 O 


.H C7\ m 


CO <r o 


vD cri 00 


CM r- -<r 



9£ 



in o o-i 


.H o m 


CTN 0^ rn 


o in o^ 


<r m ^ 


00 OJ 



00 O 00 
csl ,-H rn 
ON vO 00 



o CO in 

0^ M O 
CM vO CO 



in vD 




CO <f ^ 


<r a^ vo 


\0 CN 




CO 00 in 


m ^ M 


00 en 


o> 


rH CM 


CO 



H 2 
2 O 

>H <; 



in o^ 


o 


CO 00 o 


o .H in 


■vt 00 




CO CO vO 


00 rH 



o> in 


o 


(VJ 


vo oo 


00 o in 


00 <r 


<r 


in 


o r^ 


vO vD CO 


00 CO 


o 




M CNI 


CO 



0^ CM 


in 


o o in 


00 ON 


<r <— ) 




o r^ CO 


00 CO 


CO ,H 


in 


rH .— 1 





in CM 


<r 


in rH ^ 


^ O CM 


m <r 




-J- vO 00 


ON in CM 


a^ CO 


*^ 


O vO 00 


r^ o <r 



<t vO 


o 


vD r^ CO 


<3- CO CO 


o o 


o 


<r <r CO 


MD r^ rH 


O 00 


CM 


in -vT r^ 


ON CN rH 



00 r^ v£> 

in CO CO 



CO ^ M 

•H CU O 

S S 2 



00 d en -H jr X 



H o o 
saw 



o 




2: 




< 








Hco 1 


Z 










PC 


Pi 


H 


H- 1 





H 




H 




Pi 










^ 




2 













H 


>> 


<: 





w 


hJ 


s 




w 


w 


^ 


^ 


8 














w 




a 
















H 




w 








C/3 




W 




< 




u 








^J 




PQ 




P3 




(^ 




kJ 




<d 




H 









H 



M o in 

00 rH ro 
CN (^ t-l 



ON CM ON 

m 0-1 cN 

O f^ vO 



000 
<r vo m 



CO ro ,H 
.H r~- in 
I— I ON <r 



N-- ON 



ON in o 
r^ m <r 
CM <J- r^ 



in r^ O 
<r 00 00 
r^ r-- o 



r-^ o m 

^ CM CNl 



00 r^ ro 

i-H O CM 
ro ,-1 rH 



.H 00 O CN 



^ ^ (y\ 
in cNi -H 
r^ in in 



r^ ON <r 
r^ CNJ CM 



O -vt <N 

O CN <!• 

<r M rH 



CM oM r^ 
vc 00 CO 
CM O vO 



>, ^ nS c 



O M rH 

00 o <r 



m rH nj 



>^ 


Cfi 


^ 




en 




w 


D. 


0} 


c 


u 


cfl 


0) 




u 





0) 


§ 


M 


(U 




(U 


M 




<u 


00 




o 


3* 



.H m m 

iH CO 



D C 
CO m 



00 00 o 

in o cNi 

<a- C7\ -H 



wee 



"I ^ o 

- CM O 



•r\ G U 

^ 0) 4-1 

CO B 

en cu en 

•H (-. CO 

T3 -H (1) 

T3 CU -H 

C M cn 

CO 3 



X) O -H 
CO 60 ^ 

> cu cn 



CU r 



-159- 



CITY WORKER'S FAMILY BUDGET 

The city worker's family budget refers to the annual cost of a moderate 
living standard for a family comprised of a 38-year-old husband, a wife not 
employed full time outside the home, a 13-year-old boy, and an 8-year-old 
girl. This is the model family devised by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
U. S. Department of Labor. 

In 1976 the average urban worker's budget was $16,236 while the Baltimore 
budget was $16,195. The Washington budget at the same time was $16,950. 
Using 39 metropolitan areas to equal 100, the Baltimore area had an index of 
100 while the Washington area index was lOA. As will be noted in accompanying 
tables, average earnings differ considerably as between occupational groups 
when using the metropolitan areas base. 



-160- 



CONSUMER PRICE INDICES U.S.,^^^ BALTIMORE, Iffi. , AND WASHINGTON, D.C. 
METROPOLITAN AREAS: 1972-1976 

(1967 = 100) 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



U. S. AVERAGE 



1976 
1975 
1974 
1973 
1972 



174.8 
165.9 
152.4 
134.9 

126.3 



171.2 
161.7 
150.0 
135.0 
126.9 



170.5 
161.2 
147.7 
133.1 
125.3 



^-'-•' Based on 56 "cities" metropolitan areas and non metropolitan urban places beginning 

January, 1966. 
Source: U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Monthly Labor Review , 
June issues. 



NO. Ill 

URBAN WORKER'S FAMILY BUDGET, ^^^ 
BALTIMORE METROPOLITAN AREA AND SELECTED U.S. METROPOLITAN AREAS: AUTUMN 1976 



METROPOLITAN AREA 



TOTAL BUDGET 



^(2) 



Boston 

New York 

San Francisco - Oakland 

Washington, D.C. 

Philadelphia 

Minneapolis - St. Paul 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Cleveland 

BALTIMORE 

Los Angeles 

Cincinnati 

Pittsburgh 

Houston 

Atlanta 

Dallas 



$19,384 
18,866 
17,200 
16,950 
16,836 
16,810 
16,561 
16,514 
16,412 
16,195 
16,016 
15,708 
15,515 
14,978 
14,830 
14,699 



119 

116 

106 

104 

104 

104 

102 

102 

101 

100 

99 

97 

96 

92 

91 

91 



Urban U. S. 



16,236 



100 



(1) 



(2) 



Refers to annual cost of intermediate living standard for a family comprised of a 
38 year old husband, wife not employed full time outside the home, 13 year old boy, 
and an 8 year old girl. 

U. S. Urban Average Cost = 100. 



Source: U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Autumn 1976 Urban 
Family Budgets and Comparative Indexes for Selected Urban Areas , released 
April 27, 1977. 



W W O 

2: H o 

O <: rH 






o vO 






00 o 
ro o 



.H 00 



00 r-^ 

<N d 

00 00 

v^ 00 

rH a\ 

00 r^ 

O (Ti 



00 vO 

CO iH 
00 00 



in vD 

00 00 



00 vO 
0^ ON 



.H 00 



00 ^D 

00 r- 
in in 



00 CNI 

CO rH 



in CM 

CM CTn 



ON 00 



in cr> 
CO o 



NO. 113 

INDICES OF AVERAGE EARNINGS OF WORKERS IN SELECTED 
OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS, AND RELATIVE ADVANCE IN 29 
METROPOLITAN AREAS: MARCH 1974-JULY 1975 
(ALL METROPOLITAN AREAS = 100)* 



Atlanta, Ga. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Boston, Mass. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Chicago, 111. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Ky. , Ind. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Dallas, Fort Worth, Tex. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Denver, Boulder, Colo. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Green Bay, Wis. 

Houston, Tex. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Kansas City, Mo., Kans. 

Los Angeles, Long Beach, Calif. 

Anaheim, Santa Ana, Garden Grove, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Minneapolis, St. Paul, Minn. 

New York, N. Y. , N. J. 

Philadelphia, Pa., N. J. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Portland, Maine 

St. Louis, Mo., 111. 

San Diego, Calif. 

San Francisco, Oakland, Calif. 

Seattle, Everett, Wash. 

Washington, D. C, Md. , Va . 

Wichita, Kans. 



OFFICE 


ELECTRONIC 


SKILLED 1 


UNSKILI 


CLERICAL 


DATA PROCESSING 


MAINTENANCE 


PLAN1 


103 


102 


100 


90 


99 


96 


101 


90 


99 


97 


96 


92 


103 


98 


104 


107 


105 


103 


110 


117 


97 


99 


99 


102 


101 


104 


105 


113 


95 


93 


94 


82 


102 


98 


104 


114 


98 


102 


99 


97 


122 


118 


116 


132 


94 


- 


96 


101 


100 


102 


99 


78 


99 


97 


105 


107 


98 


101 


106 


111 


107 


104 


103 


115 


104 


109 


99 


92 


99 


97 


106 


110 


95 


97 


106 


117 


108 


111 


100 


121 


98 


100 


97 


108 


104 


99 


102 


111 


86 


- 


75 


89 


101 


99 


103 


112 


99 


98 


101 


104 


110 


107 


117 


136 


102 


101 


108 


- 


105 


100 


103 


89 


96 


- 


87 


93 



*Average pay levels for each industry and occupational group in 262 SMSA's in the United 
States (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) as established by the Office of Management and 
Budget through February 1974. 

Note: Dashes indicate data that do not meet publication criteria. 

Source: U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Wage Differences Among 
Metropolitan Areas, 1974-1975 . 



-163- 



STATE FINANCE 

Maryland's fiscal 1976 State expenditures totaled $3,504,293,000. Of 
this total 26.6 per cent went to education, 15.7 per cent to highways and 
transportation, and 14.2 per cent to public health, hospitals, and mental 
hygiene, with 8.7 per cent going to public assistance programs. 

During the same fiscal year the State received $3,531,548,000 with 25.2 
per cent of that total coming from income tax sources, 11.9 per cent from 
retail sales and use taxes, 9.8 per cent from motor vehicle user taxes and fees, 
19.8 per cent from federal funds, 10.6 per cent from sundry fees, licenses, and 
charges, 7.9 per cent from property, franchise, and excise taxes, and 14.2 per 
cent from bond proceeds. 

Net cash expenditures have increased nearly 75.7 per cent from fiscal 
year 19 72 to fiscal year 1976 while net cash receipts have increased more than 
74.6 per cent over the same time period. As might be expected, the fiscal 1976 
growth is quite large in both categories, with net cash expenditures 13.6 per 
cent above the year-earlier figure and the net cash receipts standing 14.1 per 
cent above the prior year. 



-164- 



CM VD 

ON <y\ 





<r 


vO 






r^ 




ON 


ON 




■"^ 


'"' 


H 


^ 


rn 


•z 


< 


H 


W 


H 


pL, 


U 


O 






H 


W 


oi 






w 
P-I 


O 


S 



H 
2 


^ 


en 

H 


W 


H 


PL, 


(.J 


O 


(— 1 




H 


W 


Pi 








O 


S 



2 <; H 

WHO, 
O O M 



) in vo 00 in o r^ 



ON ro 


^ 




in 


00 

00 


00 

CO 


r^ 


VO 
so 


ON 


<r 


rH O 


r^ 


o 


ON 


^ 


ro 


in 


vC 


in 


c-^in 


<3- in 


ON 


^ 


ON 


R 


ON 


S 


vO 


•<J- 


OvD 


o o- 


vD 


<r 


^ 


^ 


vO 


00 


00 


.H 


^ 



0O>— lOvOr^-iHrHCNIrH 

cNjooocNinvD<j-r~~vo 
ononc^i— irocNivooNin 

iniHinoc^Oi— ivDin 
cNONinr^r^r^.— irHM 
m CNj cNi I— I iH fo 00 



in^rcNoooooOr 



oor^<r<roOi-H<roooN 
Oi-ir^oofOcN<f<}-CNi 
ONi^OLncNiHr^inoN 

cNj<rinr--r-v£)<rcNO 



cNiONOooNvooomiHr^ 
iniHONr^ooNOOin 



r^cNiONCOfMoOt— iiHf^ 

vOi— tOi— lOOONCNCNCM 

r^-j-inoNr^ooiHONC^ 

oooNinONfOoovo^r^ 
oo,H<rr^r^ON.H cN 
00 <r en CM 0-) vD o 





(1) 


H 


0) 




QJ 




w; 




^4 


Q) 


»-i 






cn 


(fl 








^ 


en 


cn 


C) 


u 


(1) 


0) 










w 




CO 


cfl 




CO 



Qi U Vi C 



> M Pi S Pi. 1 



I CO C 4-1 

I >-< "^ 0) CL cn 

I [i* CO g -H W 

I QJ >, QJ IZ) 

: •> QJ CO O 2 

I >^ fe CX, QJ W 

■ iJ rH QJ Pi > 

1-1 >, CO Pi W 

I Q) >j j-i >-i Pi 

I ex 'O QJ C QJ 

' g -o CO x: hJ 

3 QJ O 4-1 ^ 



in 00 CO 

O 00 <7N 

vo 00 -d- 



to >H 4-1 S 
X) ^ CO PL, 
QJ O 4-J 



C C M 



-165- 



RETAIL SALES TAX RECEIPTs/^) MARYLAND, 
RANK ORDER BY MAJOR CLASS OF BUSINESS: FISCAL YEAR 1976 



CLASS OF PERCENTAGE 

BUSINESS DISTRIBUTION 



General Merchandise 21.89 

Food and Beverage 17.79 

Building and Contractors 12.12 

Miscellaneous 12.00 

Utilities and Transportation 10.88 

Furniture, Fixtures, and Appliances 8.38 

Automotive 6.58 

Apparel 5.65 

Hardware, Machinery, and Equipment 4.71 

TOTAL 100 . 00 



Does not include Assessment Collections. 

Source: Comptroller of the Treasury, 29th Annual Statistical Report of the Retail 
Sales Tax Division for Fiscal Year 1976. 



-166- 



I CO 

l-J t3 

W O PiH 

u w ^ 

CO 2 o 

M ^ Pd 

S h4 O 



o 00 o m r 



J 00 r~~ <Ti O r 



I o cNi CM 00 o in CM 



pd O JD 



(ONOvo<roNooofo<:roo 

-.HC3>00OCNO<rcN<yirH 

cMrorov£>vocTNr^vocM<vDoom<fcsirocMr^rooor~rnr^pOvD 



ggi 



< vo o o c^ 00 ^ r 



1 0^ ^O r~^ O 00 OO vO 



2 X PL, 

fe fa <3 



1 r^ 00 o cTi 00 o <r c 



vo in 00 m c 



I vO Csl •vT <3- in 



•incocoCT\r^tHooinr^r^Of 



a^ 00 m <yi r 






- cr> in vo in (Ti o ' 



lcNvj«;fcS"^-<j-cMr^r^i 



on iH vo in vo f 



Q W 

O > 

O W 

fa PQ 



- iH ctn r^ 00 r 






0) <U 4J > O »-i • 



! PQ O O O CJ O ( 





>~. o oj m 


^ 


l^|> 


•H -a 


>-l 4J »-l 13 


o (u eg 


di <u o u 


XI V4 *4-l <d 


4-1 4-1 C (U 


0) M I-. ^ 


?. g T^ Si • 



0) ^ 4:2 O O -M 



CO O 0) O M 3 



faOWKlidSfaO'COCOHrsiSISpCI 



NO. 117 

RETAIL SALES AND USE TAX RECEIPTS, BY SUBDIVISION: FISCAL YEARS 1971 AND 1976 



SUBDIVISION 



RETAIL SALES AND USE TAX RECEIPTS 
FISCAL 1976 FISCAL 1971 



PERCENTAGE CHANGE 
FY 1971/1976 



TOTAL COLLECTIONS 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

TOTAL OF SUBDIVISIONS 
AND BALTIMORE CITY 

District of Columbia 

Other Out-of-state 

Miscellaneous Use Tax 



420,881,484 

7,143,537 

27,662,497 

81,480,209 

69,231,096 

1,454,089 

1,463,823 

5,027,725 

3,888,992 

4,517,947 

2,102,538 

9,285,173 

1,673,918 

8,819,680 

8,615,929 

1,527,014 

55,291,519 

62,869,753 

1,181,867 

2,825,955 

661,178 

3,005,285 

10,890,957 

7,887,723 

5,473,154 

383,981,558 



7,080,004 

26,604,035 

3,215,887 



264,101,606 

4,844,886 

16,403,869 

67,674,042 

40,749,149 

765,587 

744,076 

2,673,157 

1,930,914 

2,333,042 

1,333,012 

5,062,616 

825,048 

4,516,362 

2,951,331 

882,235 

33,136,001 

37,159,114 

617,884 

1,514,363 

414,457 

1,787,015 

5,948,002 

4,940,619 

2,717,108 

241,923,889 



5,239,055 

15,153,089 

1,785,573 



59.4 

47.4 
68.6 
20.4 
69.9 
89.9 
96.7 
88.1 

101.4 
93.7 
57.7 
83.4 

102.9 
95.3 

191.9 
73.1 
66.9 
69.2 
91.3 
86.6 
59.5 
68.2 
83.1 
59.7 

101.4 

58.7 



35.1 
75.6 
80.1 



Source: 



Comptroller of the Treasury, 29th Annual Statistical Report of the Retail 
Sales Tax Division for Fiscal Year 1976 , p. 34, (Baltimore, 1976). 



-168- 



CT> as 



O O 



W H 
U O 



ctn -cr o 00 
in tH in en 

vO -J- vO 00 



I CO CO r~ o> 



CNl 00 iH o 

00 o in in 



00 cNj m cN <r 00 
CO <Tv <r rH CO r-> 
rH in CO <r 00 iH 



in cs CO CM 



J O -* 00 

- (T. <f ».o 



o vo ^ CT> csi r-. 
<f rH CO -vf 00 a\ 



r-H in CO CO 
o^ o r--. 00 



00 in <3- in ^ in 
.— I og rH cr\ 00 c^^ 
CO 00 in c^j I— I I — 



o <t cTi CO t— I in 



vo r~. cN I — 
vo 00 nj- in 



<r CT\ tH CM vo o 

■<r rH <r in r-~ I— I 



CNl vo <r in CM 00 

vO CM iH 00 vO rH 

<r 00 vo 00 <}• o 



CO CO r-^ iH 
CO o CJ^ m 
CT\ CO >d- in 



pa m xj j:: o ' 



bO o u 



a X; M .. rH . 



0) ca -i-j o CD o 



3 vj m a- en (1) . 

^ QJ »-i W C 

J c/2 oj c o c • 



•H M 3 O 



3 <u -a o 



NO. 119 



PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT REVENUES AND CURRENT EXPENSES: 
FISCAL YEAR 1976, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 









REVENUES 












TOTAL 
IN 






PERCENTAGE 


distribution(i) 




















OTHER 




DOLLARS 




OTHER 


FEDERAL 






STATE 


SOURCES 




PER 


LOCAL 


LOCAL 


REVENUE 


FEDERAL 


STATE 


SHARED 


OF 


SUBDIVISION 


CAPITA 


TAXES 


REVENUES 


SHARING 


GRANTS 


GRANTS 


TAXES 


REVENUE 


Allegany 


709 


29.1 


10.4 


3.6 


18.0 


34.9 


3.8 


0.2 


Anne Arundel ,„. 
Baltimore City'' '' 
Baltimore^^ 


585 


45.6 


11.4 


3.2 


11.3 


25.2 


3.3 


0.0 


1,293 


24.9 


10.6 


2.4 


29.3 


26.7 


5.1 


1.0 


647 


50.9 


15.4 


2.6 


5.6 


22.4 


3.1 


0.0 


Calvert 


956 


46.4 


3.4 


2.2 


8.7 


36.7 


2.6 


0.0 


Caroline 


717 


21.1 


4.9 


2.1 


12.6 


52.9 


6.4 


0.0 


Carroll 


698 


35.2 


6.6 


2.0 


9.5 


42.5 


4.1 


0.1 


Cecil 


597 


32.4 


7.3 


3.2 


10.7 


40.7 


5.7 


* 


Charles 


994 


27.6 


6.7 


2.4 


8.7 


52.1 


2.3 


0.1 


Dorchester 


870 


26.8 


8.8 


3.2 


10.4 


46.0 


4.7 


* 


Frederick 


751 


36.4 


9.5 


3.3 


11.7 


35.1 


4.0 


* 


Garrett 


874 


24.9 


3.9 


4.0 


8.2 


52.9 


6.1 


0.0 


Harford 


578 


43.6 


10.0 


1.4 


11.5 


30.0 


3.5 


0.0 


Howard (2) 


794 


48.9 


10.2 


1.8 


3.1 


33.5 


2.5 


0.0 


Kent 


670 


36.2 


7.5 


3.1 


12.0 


35.5 


5.8 


0.0 


Montgomery 


812 


60.6 


9.9 


1.6 


7.6 


18.0 


2.3 


* 


Prince George's 


725 


46.9 


13.8 


2.7 


9.6 


24.1 


2.5 


0.6 


Queen Anne's 


668 


31.9 


15.1 


4.2 


14.4 


27.2 


7.2 


* 


St. Mary's 


601 


31.4 


4.7 


3.6 


14.7 


41.7 


3.9 


0.0 


Somerset 


621 


23.0 


5.5 


4.8 


29.8 


31.0 


5.9 


0.1 


Talbot 


808 


31.2 


36.1 


1.7 


5.0 


21.1 


4.8 


* 


Washington 


628 


36.6 


18.5 


3.3 


10.1 


27.7 


3.8 


* 


Wicomico 


611 


38.0 


12.5 


3.7 


9.4 


30.7 


5.2 


0.4 


Worcester 


1,102 


52.3 


16.9 


1.7 


7.5 


17.5 


4.0 


0.2 


MARYLAND 


846 


39.6 


13.0 


2.4 


15.0 


25.9 


3.6 


0.4 



(continued on following page) 



PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT REVENUES AND CURRENT EXPENSES: 
FISCAL YEAR 1976, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION (Cont'd.) 











EXPENDITURES 








TOTAL 
IN 




PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION (D 








PUBLIC 










DOLLARS 




WELFARE 










PER 




AND 




PUBLIC 




SUBDIVISION 


CAPITA 


EDUCATION 


HEALTH 


HIGHWAYS 


SAFETY 


OTHER 


Allegany 


663 


54.1 


9.5 


5.4 


5.1 


25.9 


Anne Arundel 


709 


51.0 


6.5 


7.4 


8.9 


26.2 


Baltimore City^^) 


1,368 


24.1 


18.4 


12.9 


13.9 


30.7 


Baltimore (2) 


661 


52.1 


4.1 


4.9 


9.0 


30.0 


Calvert 


823 


66.2 


9.2 


7.4 


4.1 


13.1 


Caroline 


767 


62.0 


10.7 


6.1 


3.2 


17.9 


Carroll 


655 


62.0 


6.2 


8.6 


2.4 


20.7 


Cecil 


583 


60.5 


9.8 


8.3 


3.1 


18.3 


Charles 


1,219 


48.3 


7.4 


1.4 


3.0 


39.9 


Dorchester 


870 


60.9 


8.6 


10.7 


3.6 


16.2 


Frederick 


767 


55.2 


5.8 


11.3 


3.6 


24.1 


Garrett 


897 


63.5 


6.8 


19.6 


1.6 


8.4 


Harford 


561 


61.3 


7.6 


5.3 


4.6 


21.2 


Howard (2) 


792 


65.1 


3.0 


4.5 


7.3 


20.1 


Kent 


630 


61.0 


9.3 


5.2 


3.0 


21.5 


Montgomery 


803 


56.6 


6.6 


3.0 


7.0 


26.8 


Prince George's 


710 


49.7 


14.5 


2.5 


9.0 


24.4 


Queen Anne ' s 


624 


50.3 


8.8 


12.3 


2.7 


25.9 


St. Mary's 


586 


66.4 


11.7 


5.2 


3.2 


13.5 


Somerset 


546 


55.8 


12.2 


10.1 


3.9 


18.0 


Talbot 


780 


42.4 


4.9 


5.5 


3.8 


43.5 


Washington 


679 


56.2 


5.7 


6.1 


4.9 


27.1 


Wicomico 


617 


49.4 


14.0 


8.0 


5.7 


23.0 


Worcester 


1,061 


38.3 


4.1 


8.7 


7.9 


41.0 


MARYLAND 


870 


43.3 


11.1 


7.4 


9.1 


29.1 



Not all counties add to 100.0 due to rounding. 
County only. 



*Less than 0.1 per cent. 



Source: Department of Fiscal Services, Local Government Finances in Maryland , 1975- 
1976 Fiscal Year, Table 3. 



GENERAL REVENUE SHARING PAYMENTS TO MARYLAND, 

BALTIMORE CITY AND ALL COUNTIES 
ENTITLEI-IENT PERIOD 8 AND ENTITLEMENT PERIODS 1-7 



JURISDICTION 



ENTITLEMENT 
PERIODS 1-7 
JAN. 1972 - DEC. 1976 



ENTITLEMENT 
PERIOD 8 
JAN. 1, 1977 - SEPT. 30, 1977 



l(i) 



(2) 



State of Maryland 
All Counties(3) 
Baltimore City 
Other Municipalities 



Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 
Calvert 
Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 
Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



(4) 



596,732,174 

198,937,524 

236,033,140 

130,317,893 

31,443,617 

7,001,490 

27,643,370 

54,967,466 

2,292,118 

1,462,226 

4,488,340 
3,756,295 
4,936,682 
2,594,196 
7,134,354 

2,925,813 
5,986,350 
6,740,320 
1,391,032 
27,868,910 

53,096,999 
1,913,179 
4,699,834 
2,274,862 
1,536,083 

6,077,154 
3,898,586 
1,347,481 



99,252,800 

33,084,267 

40,768,948 

20,671,475 

4,728,110 

1,213,994 

3,402,202 

8,338,325 

32 7,416 

208,215 

1,170,113 
451,740 

1,044,600 
385,820 

1,210,432 

509,700 
797,597 

1,387,223 
290,663 

6,042,669 

9,568,933 
370,050 
930,968 
376,749 
263,641 

1,486,834 
783,659 
207,405 



(1) Includes payments to Maryland, Baltimore City, all counties and 149 sub 
county jurisdictions. 

^ includes State share. 

^■^^ Includes county shares, exclusive of payments to individual jurisdictions 
within a given county. 

^^^All municipalities except Baltimore City. 

Source: U. S. Department of the Treasury, Office of Revenue Sharing, Eighth Period 
Entitlements. 



FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 

The number of active banks of all types in Maryland Increased from 116 to 
a total of 118, between 1973 and 1975. Total assets increased during the 
period by 14.1 per cent. State banks and trust companies numbered the same as 
in 1973, but total assets increased by 13.4 per cent. While the number of 
national banks rose by 7.7 per cent, their total assets rose by 19.3 per cent. 
Meanwhile credit unions decreased in number from 37 in 1973 to 34 in 1975. 
Total assets of the credit unions in 1975 stood at $128.8 million, an increase 
of 32.8 per cent since 1973, however, possibly indicating an increase in the 
size of such institutions. 

The number of building, savings, and loan associations in Maryland de- 
creased from 233 at the end of 1973 to 206 two years later. Of those associa- 
tions active at the end of 1975, 55 were Federally chartered, 151 State 
chartered and 135 were State chartered with >4aryland Savings Share Insurance 
Corporation insurance. 

More than $4,200,000,000 in mortgage loans were outstanding as of 
December 31, 1976 by the associations in Maryland, a 7 per cent decrease from 
1973. Similarly, total assets decreased to $4,884,921,500, representing a 
6 per cent decrease. 



yO. 121 

ALL ACTIVE BAl^S^^^ IN MARYLAND, 

SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES: 1971, 1973 AND 1975 

(MONEY FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS AS OF DEC. 31) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1973/1975 



Number of Banks 118 116 117 1.8 

Total Assets $11,562 $10,131 $7,971 14.1 

Selected Assets: 

Total Loans, Including 6,819 6,028 4,374 13.1 

Mortgages & Judgments 

U. S. Government & Other 2,718 2,291 2,348 18.6 

Securities 

Cash & Balances with 1,249 1,100 879 13.5 

Other Banks 

Total Liabilities 10,592 8,765 7,269 20.8 

Total Deposits 9,842 8,655 6,927 13.7 

(l^National, State, Trust and Mutual Banks. 

Sources: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Fourth Annual Report, 1974 , 

Sixty-Second Annual Report, 1972 , and Sixty-Sixth Annual Report, 1976 . 
U. S. Comptroller of the Currency, Annual Report, 1973 , Annual Report, 
1971 , and Annual Report, 1975 . 



ALL ACTIVE NATIONAL BANKS IN MARYLAND ^^^ 
SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES: 1971, 1973 AND 1975 



1975 1973 1971 PER CENT CHAl^GE 

($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) 1973/1975 



Number of Banks 


42 


39 


39 


7.7 


Total Assets 


$A,966 


$4,163 


$3,185 


19.3 


Selected Assets: 










Total Loans, Including 


2,847 


2,430 


1,578 


17.2 


Mortgages & Judgments 










U. S. Government & Other 


915 


822 


910 


11.3 


Securities 










Cash & Balances with 


687 


601 


483 


14.3 


Other Banks 










Total Liabilities 


4,580 


3,834 


2,921 


19.5 


Selected Liabilities: 










Total Deposits 


4,137 


3,405 


2,689 


21.5 


Demand 


1,674 


1,706 


1,441 


-1.9 


Time & Savings 


2,464 


1,704 


1,248 


44.6 


Total Capital Accounts 


337 


290 


235 


16.2 



(1) 



As of December 31 of stated years. 



Sources: U. S. Comptroller of the Currency, Annual Report , 1975. 
U. S. Comptroller of the Currency, Annual Report , 1973. 
U. S. Comptroller of the Currency, Annual Report , 1971 



ALL ACTIVE STATE BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES IN I-IARYLAND, 
SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES: 1971, 1973, 1975 



1975 1973 1971 PER CENT CHANGE 

($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) 1973/1975 



Number of Banks 73 

Total Assets $5,357 

Selected Assets : 

Total Loans, Including 3,089 

Montgages & Judgments 
U. S. Government & Other 1,528 

Securities 
Cash & Balances with Other 536 

Banks 



73 


73 


N/C 


$4,725 


$3,695 


13.4 


2,922 


2,082 


5.7 


1,039 


1,137 


47.1 


471 


376 


13.8 



Total Liabilities 



4,871 



4,299 



3,344 



Selected Liabilities: 

Capital Stock, Surplus Un- 427 

divided Profits & Reserves 
Total Deposits 4,597 



371 
4,130 



306 
3,252 



15.1 
11.3 



Sources: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Sixth Annual Repor t, 1976. 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Fourth Annual Report , 1974. 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Second Annual Report , 1972. 

NO. 124 
ALL ACTIVE MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS IN MARYLAND, 
SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES: 1971, 1973, 1975 



1975 
($1,000,000) 



1973 1971 PER CENT CHANGE 

($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) 1973/1975 



Number of Banks 


3 


4 


5 


-33.3 


Total Assets 


$1,239 


$1,243 


$1,091 


-0.3 


Selected Assets: 










Total Loans, Including 


883 


880 


714 


0.3 


Mortgages & Judgments 










U. S. Government & Other 


276 


280 


301 


-1.4 


Securities 










Cash & Balances with Other 


26 


28 


20 


-7.1 


Bank 










Total Liabilities 


1,141 


1,149 


1,005 


-0.7 


Selected Liabilities: 










Surplus, Undivided Profits 


98 


94 


86 


4.3 


& Reserves 










Total Deposits 


1,108 


1,120 


987 


-1.1 



Sources: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Sixth Annual Report , 1976. 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Fourth Annual Report , 1974. 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Second Annual Report , 1972. 



NO. 125 
CREDIT UNIONS IN MARYLAND: 1971, 1973, 1975 











1975 




1973 




1971 


PER CENT CHANGE 


ITEM 






($1 


,000,000) 


($1 


,000,000) 


($1 


,000,000) 


1973/1975 


Number 


of Credit Unions 




34 




37 




37 


-8.1 


Total Assets 




$128.8 




$97.0 




$74.7 


32.8 


Selected Assets: 


















Loan 


to Members 






107 




82 




62 


30.5 


Cash 


(On hand and 


in banks) 


2.1 




2.2 




3.6 


-4.5 


Investments (securities; 


1 


16.2 




11.8 




8.0 


37.3 



Total Liabilities 
Selected Liabilities: 

Members Shares & Deposits 
Reserve Funds & Surplus 



112.2 
13.2 



82.9 
10.4 



63.1 
8.1 



35.3 
26.9 



Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Sixth Annual Report , 1976. 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Fourth Annual Report , 1974. 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, Sixty-Second Annual Report , 1972. 



NO. 126 



CONSUMER LOAN AND SMALL LOAN LICENSEES 
IN MARYLAND: 1975 AND 1976 



Number of Consumer Loan & 
Small Loan Licensees 

Total Assets 
Selected Assets: 

Small Loans 

Consumer Loans 

Net Total Receivables 

Net Total Property 

Total Liabilities 

Selected Liabilities: 
Total Accruals 
Total Deferred Income 

Total Capital 







PER CENT CHANGE 


1976 


1975 


1975/1976 


621 


N/A 


- 


$529,930,308 


$414,083,791 


28.0 


45,705,188 


50,142,805 


-8.8 


313,399,622 


291,126,435 


7.7 


513,599,560 


405,946,679 


26.5 


2,366,938 


2,317,056 


2.2 


478,557,368 


378,261,534 


26.5 


2,191,956 


581,286 


277.1 


27,983,198 


16,358,801 


71.1 


51,372,940 


35,822,257 


43.4 



Sources: Department of Licensing and Regulation, Office of Commissioner of Consumer 
Credit, The Composite Condition of Consumer Loan and Small Loan Licensees , 
January 1, 1976 - Dec. 31, 1976 , March 1977. 






o<rr^oc^<l■<rcooolnc3^a^o 
mo-^ro-HcsjiOiHcjooo^o-cro 
fnoincNOf^r^LncN)CTirooo<r 

oo.HincNCT>tHa>rHaNLOoor~-ro 



1rHOrHCNlOLriiH<r.-ir^O 

roNor--or^oooovOinvoo 
-cM<rmr^oooocNjoomin 



0:1 is 



00 vO 





00 







v£> 


0^ 


cvi 00 
cvi 00 
CO -vT 


CSJ 

.H 

CO <f 


CM 
CM 




CM 


in 


CO vD 
(^ 
CO o^ 


in <r in 
t^ <r r^ 
o> CO CO 


in CM 





,H 


•^ 


(T) 


CO <y\ 


CO r- -d- 



lnfOI—^ococ^^oo^f^<l"0^o^ 
v^^coovDO-r^cNioovxscNjr^ 

vd-vDCNli— lin^OCOCTNOI'^iHCTN 



^ <r vD o c^ o 



CO 00 rH ON 






w o 

H M 

<d H 



Q O 
W en 



Mr^inoNcooOvd-Ln-j-^rcocNi 
cor^cooor^r--rHcNiv:rcM<roo 
r^CTNONCo-^coincTi-ctooini 











C 




C 


ex cx 













T> 


Cfl 


(U 0) 














FQ 


Q 










4-) 













C 




n) 


CD 


C 


CD CO 






(fl 




bO -d 






m en 











•H Q) 


m 'd 




0) QJ 




* 


kJ 




"-I E^ 


u <u 


-a 


hJ hJ 




Cfi 






^ 3 


c c 


c 




m 


c 






(S 


9i J 


CO 


1 1 


r. 


cfl 


B 


PQ 




B 








n 


^ 


• en 




T) 







hJ 





g 




m Q) 


c 


M X 


hJ 




u 


-, P^ 


QJ 4-1 


rt 


•T3 -H 



CO P 00 TJ WOO) 

^icn>o OrCcocni4-ij-i, 

OCCO-U .M4-)<UC0U-|3. 



-178- 



\ o a\ m <t o r 

>cr>r^ooa\oo-<r<rooo 
-invDcNjoo -— — — — 



ro m 00 o <^ 

• CM vD CNl m ,H 



CNiO-d-iHOCTir^cNroO'— l^D 
CTNOi^m\OvOiH-<rr~-t~^ooin 
vooino<r<rr^aN-*vDvDoo 

oo.-i<roooooinoo<^iHoooo 

<r<^i— ir-^r~-vo<rincN<Hooo 



^3 



S M 



I CO rH 
0^ vO 



ID <Ti vD r~- 

tH <r in rH 

r-^ CM 00 Lo 

I in tn 00 in 

r~> CO in <r 

00 CM O CO 



rHOOrHcMinr-.^fOincM 
rooomoo^fiH^r^info 
lnoooco-d■^--o^<ro^>* 

coI^ooooa^tnofOlnfO 
coinOiniHr~^in>*cNroco 

CO^OCO^-~I^O•^<^00C^IC^I^D 



f=^ 


P 


o 


W 




hJ 


H 


1— 1 


^ 


u 


U 


a 






M 


y 



OOOfOOOCNlCOONCslCNlCNl 

r^ooooomvoocMCNiON 
^tooCTiinoi — I— ir^r^-in 

Lnoofor^>:t"CT\inr\jco\£) 
c^^<rLncs|t^cooomvoo^o 
cocNininvocTiOor^i— ii-HO 



:0v_^ TJ ^-J c 4-1 ^( 
_) « 0) H CU -H CU 



a. o o T3 >. T 



.. QJ > c O 



) ^ fin w o <u 






I tu <u a - 

> > ^ Q) C 

; <d o w o i: 



-179- 



LIFE INSURANCE 

The strength of the Maryland economy is again evident in the field of 
life insurance. Nearly $4,329,000,000 of ordinary life insurance was purchased 
in Maryland during 1976. This figure represents a 13 per cent increase from 
the prior year and a 96 per cent increase since 1970. 

When all types of life insurance are considered, Marylanders held 
7,899,000 policies with an in force valuation of almost 46.5 billion dollars. 
The average amount in force per family in Maryland stood at $31,400 during 
1976, representing an increase of 24.6 per cent since 1973. Maryland's 
average is therefore somewhat above the national family average of $30,100 
of life insurance in force. 



NO. 128 
LIFE INSURANCE IN FORCE IN MRYLAND: 1976 



NUMBER OF POLICIES 
(1,000) 



AMOUI'IT 
($1,000,000) 



Total 

Ordinary 
Group 

Industrial 
Credit 



7,899 

2,738 
1,714 
1,853 
1,594''^ 



$46,497 

23,998 

19,292 

1,034 

2,173 



Average amount in force per family $31,400 (24.6 per cent increase since 1973). 

Note: "Credit" is limited to life insurance on loans of ten years' or less 

duration. "Ordinary" and "Group" include credit life insurance on loans 
of more than ten years' duration. 

^Includes group credit certificates. 

Source: Institute of Life Insurance, Life Insurance Fact Book, 1977 . 



NO. 129 

PURCHASES OF ORDINARY LIFE INSURANCE, MARYLAND: 1970-1976 



AMOUNT PURCHASED 
($1,000,000) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
YEAR TO YEAR 



PER CENT CHANGE 
YEAR TO 1970 



1976 (P) 

1975 

1974 

1973 

1972 

1971 

1970 



$4,329 
3,823 
3,625 
3,225 
2,805 
2,500 
2,509 



13.2 
5.5 
12.4 
15.0 
12.2 
13.2 



96.0 
73.1 
64.1 
46.0 
27.0 
13.2 



vP^Preliminary. 

Note: The series includes mass-marketed ordinary insurance. Beginning with 1974, 
data include long-term individual credit insurance. 

Source: Institute of Life Insurance, Life Insurance Fact Book, 1977. 



MASS MEDIA 

There are two major market centers for the mass media in the State, as well 
as several smaller ones. The major market centers are metropolitan Baltimore 
and metropolitan Washington, D. C. 

Fourteen daily papers, including two designated as Washington, D. C. 
publications serve the State, and five more publish twice weekly. In addition, 
there are a myriad of weekly newspapers put out at least once a week through- 
out the State. 

There are ten television stations on the air in Maryland. In addition, 
there are five stations on the air from Washington, D. C. which serve many 
viewers in Maryland. 

Four of the stations in Maryland are noncommercial, as is one operating 
from Washington. However, the noncommercial channels in Maryland, with the 
call letters, WAPB, WMPB, WCPB AND WWPB are state operated stations, with the 
Maryland Public Broadcasting Commission being the licensee. Eventually, the 
Commission will operate seven channels throughout the State. In addition to 
the facilities existing presently near Annapolis, Baltimore, Hagerstown and 
Salisbury, transmitters are planned for Cumberland, Frederick and Waldorf. 

Beside its potential range, the commercial television channel on the 
Eastern Shore has its range augmented by use of cable subscription, and the 
commercial channel operating from Hagerstown has its range expanded to reach 
the surrounding Pennsylvania and West Virginia areas as well as the Maryland 
viewers due to the many homes subscribing to cable services in that market. 

Maryland radio listeners have their choice of 50 AM stations as well as 
several Washington, D. C. outlets which reach the State's residents. In 
addition to these stations, there are 46 FM stations located in Maryland, and, 

-182- 



again there are additional facilities originating from the District of 
Columbia. These FM stations cover the broad range from simultaneous pro- 
gramming with AM affiliates to partial simulcasting to independent operations. 

The communications facilities are thus well represented in the State, 
and Maryland's citizens have broad latitude and availability among the 
printed and electronic media. 



NO. 130 
TELEVISION STATIONS IN IIARYLAND: 1977 









YEAR 


(U) 


(V) 


CITY 


CALL LETTERS 


CHANNEL 


ESTABLISHED 


UHF 


OR VHF 


Annapolis 


WAPB^-*-^ 


22 


1975 




u 


Baltimore 


WBAL 


11 


1948 




V 




WBFF 


45 


1971 




u 




WJZ 


13 


1948 




V 




WMAR 


2 


1947 




V 




WMPB^-*-^ 


67 


1969 




u 


Hagerstown 


WHAG 


25 


1970 




u 




wwpb(i) 


31 


1974 




u 


Salisbury 


WBOC 


16 


1954 




u 




wcpb(i) 


28 


1971 




u 



(1) 



Noncommercial . 



Source: Standard Rate & Data Service, Inc., SRDS Spot Television , October 15, 1977. 
Maryland Center for Public Broadcasting, Telecommunications Office. 



TELEVISION BROADCAST REVENUES, EXPENSES AND INCOME^^-^ BY MARKET, 
BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON, D. C: 1976 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Number of Stations in Operation 

Time Sales ($) 
Networks 

National and Regional Advertising Sponsors 
Local Advertisers and Sponsors ^2) 

Total Broadcast Revenues ^-^^ 
Total Broadcast Expenses 

Total Broadcast Income^l) 



46,893,519 

2,553,293 

27,232,062 

17,108,164 

39,027,734 
24,782,982 

14,244,752 



78,181,011 

3,039,880 

51,469,739 

23,671,392 

64,434,325 
49,768,971 



i 



'^Before federal taxes. 

(2) 

^ '^Before commissions. 

(3) 



Consists of total time sales less commissions plus talent and program sales. 

Source: Federal Communications Commission, TV Broadcast Financial Data - 1976 , 
August 197 7. 



NO. 132 

AM AND AM/FM BROADCAST REVENUES, EXPENSES AND INCOME /^^ MARYLAND AND BALTIMORE 
METROPOLITAN AREA: 1975 



No. of Stations in Operation 



Time Sales 
Networks 
National & Regional Advertisers 

& Sponsors^-^-' 
Local Advertisers & Sponsors ^■^•' 



Total Broadcast Revenues 



(A) 



Total Broadcast Expenses 
Total Broadcast Income (-^-^ 





BALTIMORE 


STATE 


METROPOLITAN AREA 


65 


19 


63 


N/A 


$34,844,349 


$15,765,793 


350,708 


269,333 


8,107,384 


3,903,039 


26,386,257 


11,593,421 


30,854,660 


13,734,793 


27,295,461 


11,189,710 


3,558,199 


2,545,083 



Note: Includes AM-FM stations filing a combined report (counted as one station), FM 

stations associated with an AM station but reporting separately, and independent 
stations. 

' ■^Before federal taxes. 

^ -'stations with less than $25,000 time sales report only total revenues and total 
expenses. Stations with total time sales of $25,000 or more, however, accounted 
for 99 per cent of the broadcast revenues. 

^■^^ Before commissions. 

(4) 

'^Consists of total time sales less commissions plus talent and program sales. 

Source: Federal Communications Commission, AM-FM Broadcast Financial Data - 1975. 



-185- 



NO. 133 
AM RADIO STATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1977 



CITY 



CALL LETTERS 



KILOCYCLES 



ESTABLISHED 



Aberdeen 
Annapolis 



Bel Air 

Bethesda 

Bladensburg 

Brunswick 

Cambridge 

Chestertown 

Cumberland 

Easton 
Elk ton 
Frederick 

Frostburg 
Glen Bumie 
Hagerstown 

Halfway 



WANN 
WNAV 
WYRE 

WAYE 
WBAL 
WBMD 
WCAO 
WCBM 
WEBB 
WFBR 
WITH 
WSID 
WWIN 

WVOB 

WGMS 
WPGC 
WTRI 

WCEM 

WCTR 

WCMD 
WTBO 
WCBC 



WFMD 
WZYQ 



WFRB 
WJRO 



WARK 
WJEJ 



1190 

1430 

810 

860 

1090 

750 

600 

680 

1360 

1300 

1230 

1010 

1400 

1520 

570 
1580 
1520 

1240 



12 30 
1450 
1270 



930 
1370 



560 
1590 



1490 
1240 



1947 
1949 
1946 

1955 
1925 
1947 
1922 
1924 
1955 
1922 
1941 
1947 
1948 

1963 

1946 
1954 
1966 

1947 

1963 

1948 
1928 
1953 



1936 
1960 



1958 
1963 



1947 
1932 



1962 



(continued on following page) 



-186- 



NO. 133 
AM RADIO STATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1977 (Cont'd.) 



CALL LETTERS 



KILOCYCLES 



ESTABLISHED 



Havre De Grace 


WASA 


La Plata 


WSMD 


Laurel 


WLMD 


Leonardtown 


WKIK 


Lexington Park 


WPTX 


Oakland 


WMSG 


Ocean City 


WETT 


Pocomoke City 


WDMV 


Potomac - Cabin John 


WCTN 


Rockville 


WINX 


Salisbury 


WBOC 




WICO 




WJDY 


Silver Spring 


WGAY 


Thurmont 


WTHU 


Tows on 


WTOW 


Westminster 


WTTR 


Wheaton 


WDON 



1330 
1560 

900 
1370 

920 
1050 
1590 

540 

950 

1600 

960 
1320 
1470 

1050 

1450 

15 70 

1470 

1540 



1948 

1965 

1965 

1953 

1953 

1963 

1960 

1955 

1965 

1951 

1940 
1957 
1958 

1945 

1967 

1955 

1953 

1954 



Source: Standard Rate & Data Service, Inc., SRDS Spot Radio , October 1, 1977. 



NO. 134 
FM RADIO STATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1977 



Annapolis 

Arnold 
Baltimore 



Bel Air 
Bethesda 

Bladensburg 
Braddock Heights 
Cambridge 
Catonsville 
Cumberland 

Easton 

Emmitsburg 

Frederick. 

Frostburg 

Glen Burnie 

Hagerstown 



CALL LETTERS 


MEGACYCLES 


WFSI 


107.9 


WNAV 


99.1 


WACC^l) 


89.9 


WIYY 
WBJC(1> 


97.9 
91.5 


WXYV 


102.7 


WITH 


104.3 


WLIF 


101.9 


WLPL 


92.3 


WMAR 


106.5 


WPOC 


93.1 


WRBS 
WSPH^l) 


95.1 
88.1 


WDJQ 
WEAA*'^^ 


104.3 
88.9 



WHFC(I) 

WHFS 
WJMD 
WGMS 

WPGC 

WZYQ 

WESP 

WKTK 

WPVM 
WKGO 

WEMD 

WFRE 
WFRB 
WBKZ 

wwcs 

WJEJ 



102.3 
94.7 
103.5 

95.5 

103.9 

106.3 

105.7 

102.9 
106.1 

96.7 

89.9 

99.9 

105.3 

95.9 

106.9 
104.7 



ESTABLISHED 

1960 
1947 

1976 

1958 
1951 
1947 
1949 
1970 
1960 
1960 
1950 
1964 
1974 
1941 
1977 

1972 

1961 
1949 
1946 

1957 

1972 

1968 

1963 

1948 
1962 

1975 

1977 

1959 

1965 

1965 

1957 
1947 



(continued on following page) 



NO. 134 
FM RADIO STATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1977 (Cont'd.) 



CITY 



CALL LETTERS 


MEGACYCLES 


WQCM 


96.7 


WHDG 


103.7 


WXTR 


104.1 


WMSG 


92.1 


WMJS 


92.7 


WBOC 


104.7 


WICO 


94.3 


WGAY 


99.5 


WGTS(I) 


91.9 


wcvt(i) 


89.7 


WTTR 


100.7 


WCRH*^^^ 


90.5 


WYII 


95.9 



ESTABLISHED 



Halfway 

Havre De Grace 

La Plata 

Oakland 

Prince Frederick 

Salisbury 

Silver Spring 
Takoma Park 
Tows on 
Westminster 
Williamsport 

Worton 



1965 

1959 

1965 

1966 

1973 

1965 
1969 

1959 

1957 

1976 

1959 

1976 
1972 



,(1) 



Noncommercial. 

Source: Standard Rate & Data Service, Inc., SRDS Spot Radio , October 1, 1977. 
Maryland Center for Public Broadcasting, Telecommunications Office. 



NO. 135 
DAILY AND WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS OF GENERAL CIRCULATION IN MARYLAND: 1977 



DAILY NEWSPAPERS 



PLACE OF 
PUBLICATION 



Washington, D. C. 

Washington, D. C. 

Annapolis 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Cambridge 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Easton 

Frederick 

Frederick 

Hagerstown 

Hagerstown 

Salisbury 



NAME OF PAPER 



The Washington Post & Times Herald 

The Evening Star -News 

The Evening Capital 

The Baltimore News American 

Sun 

The Evening Sun 

The Daily Record 

The Daily Banner 

The Cumberland Daily News 

The Cumberland Evening Times 

The Easton Star-Democrat 

The Frederick Post 

The News 

The Daily Mail 

The Morning Herald 

The Salisbury Daily Times 



DATE 








ESTABLISHED 


TIME OF 


ISSUE 


1877 


Morning 


& 


Sunday 


1852 


Evening 


& 


Sunday 


1884 


Evening 






1872 


Evening 


& 


Sunday 


1837 


Morning 


& 


Sunday 


1910 


Evening 






1888 


Morning 






1897 


Evening 






1870 


Morning 






1869 


Evening 


& 


Sunday 


1799 


Evening 






1910 


Morning 






1883 


Evening 






1828 


Evening 






1873 


Morning 






1923 


Evening 


& 


Sunday 



(No Saturday) 



WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS 



PLACE OF 






DATE 


DAY OF 


PUBLICATION 


COUNTY 


NAME OF PAPER 


ESTABLISHED 


ISSUE 


Aberdeen 


Harford 


The Harford Democrat 


1856 


Wednesday 


Annapolis 


Anne Arundel 


Anne Arundel Times 


1951 


Thursday 


Arbutus 


Baltimore 


The Arbutus Times 


1956 


Thursday 


Baltimore 


Baltimore City 


Afro-American 


1892 


Tuesday & 
Friday 


Baltimore 


Baltimore City 


Catholic Review 


1913 


Thursday 


Baltimore 


Baltimore City 


Jewish Times 


1919 


Friday 


Baltimore 


Baltimore City 


Labor Herald 


1888 


Friday 


Bel Air 


Harford 


The Aegis 


1856 


Thursday 


Bethesda 


Montgomery 


The Bethes da-Chevy Chase 
Tribune 


1937 


Friday 


Bowie 


Prince George's 


Blade & Post Times 


1967 


Thursday 


Bowie 


Prince George's 


Bowie/Prince George's 
County News 


1962 


Wednesday 



(continued on following page) 



-190- 



NO. 135 
DAILY AND WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS OF GENERAL CIRCULATION IN MARYLAND: 1977 (Cont'd.) 









WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS 






PLACE OF 






DATE 


DAY OF 


PUBLICATION 


COUNTY 


NAME OF PAPER ESTABLISHEE 


1 ISSUE 


Cambridge 


Dorchester 


The Dorchester News 


1923 


Wednesday 


Catonsville 


Baltimore 


Times 


1881 


Thursday 


Centreville 


Queen Anne's 


Queen Anne's Record 
Observer 


1824 


Wednesday 


Chestertown 


Kent 


Kent County News 


1793 


Wednesday 


Chevy Chase 


Montgomery 


Montgomery Journal 


1973 


Thursday 


Clinton 


Prince George's 


Star-Leader 


1963 


Thursday 


College Park 


Prince George's 


Prince George's Journal 


1976 


Thursday 


Crisfield 


Somerset 


The Crisfield Times 


1888 


Friday 


Damascus 


Montgomery 


The Courier 


1962 


Wednesday 


Denton 


Caroline 


The County Record 


1952 


Wednesday 


Dun da Ik 


Baltimore 


Eagle 


1969 


Thursday 


Dundalk 


Baltimore 


Times 


1929 


Thursday 


Elkton 


Cecil 


The Cecil Democrat 


1840 


Wednesday 


Elkton 


Cecil 


The Cecil Whig 


1841 


Wednesday 


Ellicott City 


Howard 


The Howard County Times 


1840 


Monday & 
Thursday 


Ellicott City 


Howard 


Howard County News 


1963 


Thursday 


Emmitsburg 


Frederick 


The Chronicle 


1879 


Friday 


Essex 


Baltimore 


Times 


1962 


Thursday 


Federalsburg 


Caroline 


The Federalsburg Times 


1929 


Wednesday 


Frostburg 


Allegany 


The Allegany Citizen 


1948 


Thursday 


Frostburg 


Allegany 


The People's Guardian 


1965 


Thursday 


Gaithersburg 


Montgomery 


Gazette 


1960 


Thursday 


Glen Burnie 


Anne Arundel 


Maryland Gazette-Glen 
Burnie News 


1727 


Monday & 
Thursday 


Hancock 


Washington 


The Hancock News 


1914 


Thursday 


Havre de Grace 


Harford 


The Havre de Grace Record 


1868 


Wednesday 


Hyattsville 


Prince George's 


Prince George's Sentinel 


1967 


Wednesday 


Hyattsville 


Prince George's 


The Prince George's Post 


1932 


Thursday 


La Plata 


Charles 


Maryland Independent 


1872 


Thursday 


La Plata 


Charles 


Times-Crescent 


1844 


Monday & 
Thursday 


Laurel 


Prince George's 


The News Leader 


1897 


Thursday 


Leonardtown 


St. Mary's 


St. Mary's Beacon 


1839 


Thursday 


Lexington Park 


St. Mary's 


The Enterprise 


1883 


Thursday 


Lexington Park 


St. Mary's 


St. Mary's Guardian 


1974 


Thursday 


Middletown 


Frederick 


The Valley Register 


1844 


Friday 


Mt. Airy 


Carroll 


Community Reporter 


1929 


Friday 


Oakland 


Garrett 


The Republican 


1877 


Thursday 


Ocean City 


Worcester 


Eastern Shore Times 


1925 


Thursday 


Ocean City 


Worcester 


Maryland Coast Press 


1969 


Wednesday 


Pikesville 


Baltimore 


Northwest Star 


1966 


Thursday 


Pocomoke City 


Worcester 


Worcester County Messenger 


1867 


Wednesday 


Preston 


Caroline 


News and Bay County Farmer 


1866 


Thursday 



(continued on following page) 



NO. 135 
DAILY AND WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS OF GENERAL CIRCULATION IN MARYLAND: 1977 (Cont'd.) 











WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS 






PLACE OF 








DATE 


DAY OF 


PUBLICATION 


COUNTY 




NAME OF PAPER 


ESTABLISHED 


ISSUE 


Prince Frederick 


Calvert 




Calvert Independent 


1939 


Wednesday 


Prince Frederick 


Calvert 




The Recorder 


1971 


Thursday 


Prince Frederick 


Calvert 




Calvert Journal-Gazette 


1863 


Saturday 


Princess Anne 


Somerset 




Marylander and Herald 


1828 


Thursday 


Randallstown 


Baltimore 




Times 


1828 


Thursday 


Rockvllle 


Montgomery 




Montgomery County Sentine 


1 1855 


Thursday 


Salisbury 


Wicomico 




The Salisbury Advertiser 
& Wicomico Count Ian 


1867 


Thursday 


Sevema Park 


Anne Arundel 


Anne Arundel Observer 


1965 


Wednesday 


Silver Hill 


Prince George's 


Courier 


1945 


Thursday 


Silver Spring 


Montgomery 




The Maryland Monitor 


1963 


Thursday 


Silver Spring 


Montgomery 




Suburban Record 


1943 


Friday 


Stevensville 


Queen Anne' 


s 


Bay Times 


1964 


Thursday 


Sykesvllle 


Carroll 




Sykesvllle Herald 


1913 


Thursday 


Taney town 


Carroll 




Carroll Record 


1894 


Thursday 


Thurmont 


Frederick 




The Catoctin Enterprise 


1940 


Friday 


Towson 


Baltimore 




The Jeffersonian 


1912 


Friday 


Tows on 


Baltimore 




Times 


1968 


Thursday 


Upper Marlboro 


Prince Geoi 


•ge's 


The Enquirer-Gazette 


1850 


Thursday 


Waldorf 


Charles 




Citizen News 


1975 


Thursday 


Washington, D.C. 


Washington, 


D.C. 


The Catholic Standard 


1951 


Thursday 


Washington, D.C. 


Washington, 


D.C. 


Afro American 


1934 


Tuesday & 
Friday 


Washington, D.C. 


Washington, 


D.C. 


Jewish Week 


1965 


Thursday 


Washington, D.C. 


Washington, 


D.C. 


The Times of the America 


1959 


Wednesday 


Westminster 


Carroll 




The Carroll County Times 


1911 


Monday & 
Thursday 


Source: Maryland 


Manual, 1977-1978, 


pp. 471-473. 







-192- 






ro o 






r- 00 o> 
r^ in o 

<!■ O CNI 



r^ o 

CTv CN 



ON on iH 



0^ rH 


m ro 


00 vO 


a^ rH 




CM CN 



>,§ 






Q) 








(U 


C JH 


o 




c 






M 


en 


cd <d 


e 




•H 






(1) 


<u 


W) 


•H 


(U 




o 






^ 


0) 0) 




> 


O 








o 


•H d 


iH 






M 




CO 


)-l 


^^ 


CO 


m 


(D 


CO 


(U 


x: 


a 


PQ 


o 


o 


O 


o 


u 



>-l M-l CO 4-1 -U 



O K W Ni S 



O Q) en 
<U C - 

-5 H QJ 



CL, o* CO oo H 






-193- 



COURTS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

This section deals with the Juvenile Facilities, adult correctional 
facilities, state trial courts (civil and criminal), and the federal trial 
court in Maryland (civil and criminal) . 

The juvenile facilities in Maryland are under the jurisdiction of the 
State Division of Juvenile Services, a constituent agency of the Department of 
Health and Mental Hygiene. In the twelve month period from July, 1975 
through June 1976 there were 58,105 juvenile court cases reported with the 
largest number coming from Baltimore City (24,884), followed by the metro- 
politan counties of Prince George's (9,074), Baltimore (5,230), Anne Arundel 
(5,050), and Montgomery (4,417). The average daily population in March 1976 
of the six juvenile institutions in the State was 1,147. Comparable average 
population data available for March, 1977 show a 7.0 per cent increase to 1,227. 

Adult correctional institutions in the State housed an average daily 
population of 6,588 inmates in fiscal 1976. The average annual per capita cost 
per inmate was $5,136. More inmates were committed from Baltimore City (2,718) 
during fiscal 19 76 than were committed from the combined counties (1,662). 
These statistics, of course, deal with the statewide correctional institutions, 
and local facilities are not included. The institutions covered in this pub- 
lication are the Maryland House of Correction, Maryland Penitentiary, Maryland 
Correctional Institution-Hagerstown, Maryland Correctional Institution for 
Women-Jessup, Correctional Camp System, Central Laundry and Coimnunity Corrections. 

As of August, 1976 there were 85 Circuit Court (trial) judges in the 
state which is divided into eight judicial districts for administrative purposes. 
Each county has a minimum of one jurist, and Baltimore City has 22 trial judges. 
On the basis of population per judge, the range is from 16,600 per judge in 

-194- 



Kent County to 82,500 per judge in Carroll County. Though these extreme ranges 
are severe, a more moderate range will be noted generally by the reader of the 
table. On a statewide average, the population per judge is 48,888 with 1,068 
civil cases and 397 criminal cases representing the trial load. During the 
year from July 1, 19 75 through July 30, 19 76 62,158 civil cases were filed in 
Maryland trial courts, an increase of 15.3 per cent over fiscal year 1974, and 
54,464 civil cases were disposed of in the same period, a 4.6 per cent increase 
in dispositions. 

There was a 37.2 per cent increase in the filing of criminal cases, and a 
23.9 per cent increase in dispositions in this area. As a consequence, there- 
fore, when all cases (civil and criminal) filed in the trial courts of Maryland 
are considered for this period, there were 95,902 cases filed, an increase of 
22.1 per cent, while there were 87,374 dispositions, representing a 11.1 per cent 
increase. 

The United States District Court for the District of Maryland (coincident 
with the state boundaries) sits in Baltimore City. Relatively speaking its 
backlog remains in good condition. As of June 30, 1976 there were 1,792 civil 
cases and 619 criminal cases pending. In absolute terms 1,655 civil cases and 
1,199 criminal cases were terminated during the fiscal year. 

The bankruptcy backlog did increase somewhat over the same time frame, 
with 1,530 cases being commenced and 1,001 terminated. More than 1,146 passport 
applications were handled, and 1,589 aliens were naturalized in the Court 
during the 1976 fiscal year. 



-195- 



NO. 137 



NUMBER OF JUDGES, POPULATION AND CASE LOAD PER JUDGE, MARYLAND 
CIRCUIT COURTS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: FISCAL YEAR 1976 



JURISDICTION 


NUMBER OF 
JUDGES 


POPULATION 
PER JUDGE 


Maryland 


85 


48,888 


Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 


2 

7 
22 
10 

1 


40,200 
49,214 
37,014 
65,910 
27,500 


Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


20,400 
82,500 
27,450 
62,700 
29,300 


Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


2 
1 
3 
2 
1 


48,550 
23,300 
44,733 
51,700 
16,600 


Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 


10 

10 

1 

1 
1 


59,260 
69,740 
20,200 
55,000 
19,300 


Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 


1 
2 
1 

1 


25,700 
54,150 
59,100 
27,700 



(1) 



CASES FILED PER JUDGE 



1,068 

790 
1,030 
1,351 
1,001 

648 

344 
1,136 

689 
1,368 

919 

768 
420 
746 
801 
380 

686(2) 
1,411 
312 
936 
392 

431 

861 

1,201 



123 
351 
823 
337 
116 



454 
176 
391 
185 

177 
136 
174 
280 
104 

183 
245 
176 
15 3 
246 

104 
259 
449 
373 



(^)population estimates for July 1, 1976 issued by the Maryland Center for Health 
Statistics. 

(2) 

Juvenile causes not included since they are heard at the District Court level. 

Source: Administrative Office of the Courts, Annual Report 1975-1976 . 



NO. 13S 
CASES FILED IN CIRCUIT COURTS, MARYLAND: FISCAL YEARS 1974 AND 1976 





1976 




1974 




PER CENT 
1974/1 
F 


CHANGE 
976 


TYPE OF CASE FILED 


TERMINATED 


FILED 


TERMINATED 


T 


Law 18,724 


19,880 


17,505 


20,616 


7.0 




-3.6 


Equity 43,434 


34,584 


36,411 


31,438 


19.3 




10.0 


Total Civil Cases 62,158 


54,464 


53,916 


52,054 


15.3 




4.6 


Criminal 33,744 


32,910 


24,603 


26,567 


37.2 




23.9 


Total All Types 95,902 


87,374 


78,519 


78,621 


22.1 




11.1 


Source: Administrative Office of the Courts, Annual 


Report for 


1975-1976 


and 


1973-1974. 



AVERAGE TIME INTERVALS, DISPOSITIONS OF APPEALS, MARYLAND COURT OF 
APPEALS, IN MONTHS: 1962-1975 



COURT 
TERM 



TOTAL 
INTERVAL 



DOCKETED TO 
ARGUMENT 



ARGUMENT TO 
DECISION 



1975 
1974 
1973 
1972 
1971 
1970 
1969 
1968 
1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 
1963 
1962 



3.3 
7.0 
6.0 
6.0 
5.4 
5.5 
5.7 
7.6 
8.9 
9.4 
8.7 
7.3 
6.1 
6.1 



2.2 
5.3 
4.8 
5.0 
4.4 
4.6 
4.6 
6.5 
7.8 
8.3 
7.9 
6.1 
4.9 
4.6 



1.1 
1.7 
1.2 
1.0 
1.0 
0.9 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
0.8 
1.2 
1.2 
1.5 



Source: Administrative Office of the Courts, Annual Report , 1975-1976 and 1973-1974. 



§^ 



SB 

H O 
O O 



q o 

Pi u 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR MARYLAND, CIVIL AND CRIMINAL CASES 
AND BANKRUPTCY, ADMINISTRATIVE, AND CITIZEN MATTERS: 
FISCAL YEARS 1974 AND 1976 



TOTAL CIVIL CASES (U. S. AND PRIVATE) 
Pending as of July 1 of previous year 
Commenced 
Terminated 
Pending as of June 30 of stated year 

CRIMINAL CASES 

Pending as of July 1 of previous year 

Commenced 

Terminated 

Pending as of June 30 of stated year 

Pending as of June 30 with fugitive defendants, etc.^^'' 

BANKRUPTCY CASES 

Pending as of July 1 of previous year 

Commenced 

Terminated 

Pending as of June 30 of stated year 

PASSPORT APPLICATIONS PROCESSED 
PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION 
ALIENS NATURALIZED 



1,452 


1. 


,343 


1,995 


1, 


,319 


1,655 


1 


,342 


1,792 


1, 


,320 


465 




385 


1,353 
1,199^1) 




708 
702 


619 




391 


105 




89 


1,167 




925 


1,530 




659 


1,001 




808 


1,696 




776 


1,146 
1,623 


3 

1 


,463 
,989(3) 


1,589 


1 


,933 



(1) 



Includes transfers. 



(^^ Includes fugitives and defendants serving in the Armed Forces. Data include only 
cases pending 6 months or more at the end of the fiscal year. 

(3)Excludes petitions transferred from another district. 

Source: Annual Report of the Director of the Administrative Office of the United 
States Courts for years cited. 



-200- 



OFFENSES OF PERSONS COMMITTED TO STATE 
INSTITUTIONS: FISCAL 1976 



MALES REC'D. 
FROM COURT ^^^ 



FEMALES REC'D. 
FROM COURT 



PER CENT 
OF TOTAL 



TOTALS (2) 5,506 

Arson 17 

Assault 7 34 

Breaking and Entering 493 

Contempt of Court 20 

Contributing to the 1 

Delinquency of a Minor 

Destruction of Property 114 

Domestic Relations 8 

Disorderly Conduct 20 

Escape 33 

False Pretenses 72 

Forgery 63 

Gambling 5 

Kidnapping 27 

Larceny 658 

Motor Vehicle 145 

Manslaughter 55 

Murder 1 49 

Murder 2 81 

Narcotics 413 

Probation Violation 281 

Rape 92 

Robbery 174 

Robbery with a 517 

Deadly Weapon 

Shoplifting 166 

Stolen Goods 116 

Theft 7 

Sexual 53 

Weapons 129 

Other 839 

Unauthorized Use 124 



5,853 



5 


22 


0.4 


52 


786 


13.4 


4 


497 


8.5 


1 


21 


0.4 


1 


2 


* 


1 


115 


2.0 


1 


9 


0.2 


2 


22 


0.4 


1 


34 


0.6 


18 


90 


1.5 


16 


79 


1.3 


1 


6 


0.1 


1 


28 


0.5 


4 


662 


11.3 


2 


147 


2.5 


13 


68 


1.2 





49 


0.8 


5 


86 


1.5 


40 


453 


7.7 


38 


319 


5.5 





92 


1.6 


9 


183 


3.1 


18 


535 


9.1 


66 


232 


4.0 


8 


124 


2.1 


1 


8 


0.1 


3 


56 


1.0 


13 


142 


2.4 


19 


858 


14.7 


4 


128 


2.2 



*Less than 0.05. 
(1) 



(2) 



Males Received from Court. 

Total number of offenses is greater than the total number of committed persons 
due to some persons being convicted of more than one offense. 

Source: Maryland Division of Correction, Forty-Eighth Report, Fiscal Year 1976 . 



-201- 



JURISDICTIONS FROM WHICH COMMITTED PERSONS WERE RECEIVED: 
FISCAL YEAR 1976 



JURISDICTION 



MALES RECEIVED 
FROM COURT 



FEMALES RECEIVED 
FROM COURT 



PER CENT 
OF TOTAL 



Maryland 



4,100 



Allegany 


28 


Anne Arundel 


122 


Baltimore City 


2,550 


Baltimore 


258 


Calvert 


39 


Caroline 


14 


Carroll 


32 


Cecil 


31 


Charles 


48 


Dorchester 


34 


Frederick 


42 


Garrett 


23 


Harford 


15 


Howard 


53 


Kent 


25 


Montgomery 


59 


Prince George's 


481 


Queen Anne's 


39 


St. Mary's 


31 


Somerset 


21 


Talbot 


22 


Washington 


38 


Wicomico 


67 


Worcester 


28 


Source: Marylan( 


d Division o: 



1 


29 


0.7 


8 


130 


3.0 


.68 


2,718 


62.1 


25 


283 


6.5 


1 


40 


0.9 





14 


0.3 





32 


0.7 


1 


32 


0.7 


4 


52 


1.2 


2 


36 


0.8 


2 


44 


1.0 


2 


25 


0.6 


1 


16 


0.4 


1 


54 


1.2 


2 


27 


0.6 


6 


65 


1.5 


35 


516 


11.8 


2 


41 


0.9 





31 


0.7 


4 


25 


0.6 


5 


27 


0.6 


3 


41 


0.9 


7 


74 


1.7 





28 


0.6 



Forty-Eighth Report, Fiscal Year 1976 . 



AGE GROUPS OF COMMITTED PERSONS, ALL ADULT INSTITUTIONS: 
FISCAL YEAR 1976 









MALES 


RECEIVED 


FEMALES RECEIVED 




PER CENT OF 


AGE 




FROM COURT 


FROM 


COURT 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


Total 




4 


,100 




280 


4,380 


100.0 


16 years and 


younger 




40 




2 


42 


1.0 


17 years 






137 




3 


140 


3.2 


18 years 






312 




11 


323 


7.4 


19 years 






347 




8 


355 


8.1 


20 years 






336 




15 


351 


8.0 


21 years 






346 




16 


362 


8.3 


22-25 years 






975 




92 


1,067 


24.4 


26-30 years 






698 




68 


766 


17.5 


31-35 years 






394 




23 


417 


9.5 


36-40 years 






197 




18 


215 


4.9 


41-50 years 






213 




17 


230 


5.3 


51-60 years 






80 




6 


86 


2.0 


61 years and 


older 




17 




1 


18 


0.4 


No information available 


8 







8 


0.2 


Source: Maryland Division o 


f Correction, 


Forty-EJ 


Lghth Report, 


Fiscal Year 


1976. 



LENGTHS OF SENTENCES OF COMMITTED PERSONS, 
INSTITUTIONS: FISCAL YEAR 1976 



SENTENCE LENGTH 



MALES RECEIVED 
FROM COURT 



FEMALES RECEIVED 
FROM COURT 





PER CENT OF 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


4,380 


100.0 


25 


0.6 


537 


12.3 


707 


16.1 


469 


10.7 


350 


8.0 


506 


11.6 


665 


15.2 


353 


8.1 


294 


6.7 


199 


4.5 


222 


5.1 


53 


1.2 





0.0 





0.0 



Total Sentences 4,100 

3 months 2 3 

4-6 months 491 

7 months - 1 year 661 

13-18 months 439 

19 months - 2 years 314 

25 months - 3 years 470 

37 months - 5 years 623 

61 months - 8 years 335 

97 months - 10 years 282 

121 months - 15 years 196 

More than 15 years 213 

Life 53 

To be executed 

Indefinite 



280 

2 

46 

46 

30 

36 

36 

42 

18 

12 

3 

9 









Source: Maryland Division of Correction, Forty-Eighth Report, Fiscal Year 1976 . 



NO. 146 

DISPOSITION OF ALL JUVENILE COURT CASES, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 
FISCAL YEARS 1972, 1974, AND 1976 



POLITICAL CUMULATIVE TOTAL CUMULATIVE TOTAL CWIULATIVE TOTAL 

SUBDIVISION FISCAL YEAR 1976 FISCAL YEAR 1974 FISCAL YEAR 1972 

Maryland 58,105 47,977 30,485 

Allegany 475 545 457 

Anne Arundel 5,050 3,706 2,393 

Baltimore City 24,884 17,782 7,296 

Baltimore 5,230 5,532 3,890 

Calvert 310 284 216 

Caroline 146 150 129 

Carroll 623 549 285 

Cecil 549 483 485 

Charles 962 951 638 

Dorchester 212 317 203 

Frederick 831 760 487 

Garrett 164 119 137 

Harford 1,005 915 1,075 

Howard 989 789 417 

Kent 154 214 154 

Montgomery 4,417 3,547 2,910 

Prince George's 9,074 8,592 6,934 

Queen Anne's 154 181 168 

St. Mary's 502 456 324 

Somerset 153 126 118 

Talbot 233 195 151 

Washington 852 691 609 

Wicomico 320 437 288 

Worcester 816 656 721 

Source: State of Maryland, Department of Juvenile Services, Monthly Report, June, 
1972, 1974 and 1976. 



pi, ^ 
pa p 

O 2 



tH <r o cr> 



r~~- 00 vO iH f^ o 



00 c^ in <r o - 



r^ rH in csj vc o 
CTi o^ ro 00 r^ I— I 
«* 00 <• 



H 00 in 00 ro 00 









00 00 CO r^ in «* 



inOOOiHOOiH OCTivDt^( 

oooor^rHr^>d- <rr^roini 



CO <d 

60 



g e- 



I > o 

1 CO CO 
) CJ o 



U C_> U Q P^ O 



t»o cfl 








>-, o <u 


CO C 


§«l 


i-i a) 60 o 4J 


o <u 


eg CO j-1 c -H CO 

S »-l O -H B (U 


60 O C 


■u C 0) 


0) ^ ^ o o 


C -H (U 


. S rH CO U >-l 


o ^J 3 


W O CO CO mH o 


S Ph o- 


W M H 12 & & 



AVERAGE DAILY TOTAL POPULATION OF JUVENILE INSTITUTIONS, BY INSTITUTION: 
MARCH 1976 AND MARCH 1977 



AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION 



PER CENT CHANGE 



INSTITUTION 



MARCH, 1977 MARCH, 1976 



MARCH, 1976 -MARCH, 1977 



Boy's Village 


71 


50 


Maryland Training School 


453 


433 


for Boys 






Montrose School for Girls 


397 


364 


Forestry Camps 


175 


168 


Maryland Children's Center 


80 


82 


T. J. S. Waxter 


51 


50 



1,147 



42.0 
4.6 

9.1 

4.2 

-2.4 

2.0 

7.0 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Juvenile Services, Monthly Report, March, 1977. 



CAPACITY, AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION AND ANNUAL PER CAPITA COSTS OF 
ADULT CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS BY INSTITUTION: 
FISCAL YEAR 1976 



INSTITUTION 



ACA RATED 
MAXIMUM 

BED 
CAPACITY (1) 



CURRENT 
MAXIMUM 
CAPACITY 



(2) 



AVERAGE DAILY 
POPULATION 



ANNUAL PER 
CAPITA COSTS 



Maryland House of Correction 

Maryland Penitentiary 

Maryland Correctional 
Institution, Hagerstown 

Maryland Correctional 
Institution for Women 

Correctional Camps 

Central Laundry 

Community Corrections 

General Funds (Male Only) 
Federal Funds (Males) 
Federal Funds (Females) 

Total for Division 

Average Per Capita Cost 



1,003 
1,699 



1,763 
1,472 
1,971 



1,677 
1,465 
1,948 



$4,931 
5,447 
5,173 



768 


1,078 


976 


4,068 


112 


192 


189 


3,496 


32 


32 


33 


6,825 


128 


128 


78 


9,323 


28 


28 


21 


10,875 


866 


6,880 


6,588 





5,136 



(■'-^The American Correctional Association bases its ratings for maximum bed capacity on 

59 square feet per inmate. 
'■^ ^Maximum number of beds available. 
Source: Maryland Division of Correction, Forty-Eighth Report, Fiscal Year 1976 . 



SOCIAL SERVICES 

Programs of the various local departments of social services are subject 
to the supervision, direction, and control of the Maryland Social Services 
Administration, a major agency within the Department of Human Resources. 

Generally speaking, the locally administered programs are public 
assistance, financial eligibility for medical assistance, child welfare ser- 
vices, and other services related to social planning. Funds for the various 
programs come from Federal, State and local sources, with percentage portions 
varying by the type of program. 

In fiscal 1976 over $278,000,000 was paid out to individuals and families, 
an increase of 12.6 per cent over the preceding year and a 95.7 per cent 
increase since 1970. Over 54 per cent of these payments were in the form of 
aid to families with dependent children. The total value of food stamp coupons 
sold in fiscal 1976 was $134,100,421, an increase of 14.5 per cent over the 
preceding year. 



HvDiHr-imu~)fO<rcMr 



o> 00 -* fo c 



r-» m 00 
vo r^ 00 
tH m CO 



J <r o CT. o L 



^ 00 r^ ^ 



1 -d- On a^ O >H CN C 

• <r 00 c^ vD o <r r 

) O 00 iH 



>i^-^cN-d-r--ooOcMr^f 
•om<j-Oooo<Ti\Ocgf 

^I^CMfsJ-HiHOiHiHr^f 



joo<rinocov£(-;j-r^ 
-o^vDO^^ooI^^^m 



>a- o .H 









^oovo<-ovot^csirov£)ro\ocriCMin<-iHiOfnmcM^O 
- -— ■^.,HmvOvo-<rmoooorovo<TicNiHfor>.>*vocM 
"-"" •-noocD>r^<ti-loot*ir^OvD 



mofO l^)C^l«^lO^O^00\Of^f^^Ovf■f 



1 o <r 00 r^ f 



■) r^ o rH vo 00 tn c 



-vOOr^vO>X)\D00vO00f 



H P 
O a 

H W 



m o V 

rH 0\ r 
vO iH C 



0>d-vOOOCNrO<a-CT\000<fCMOOO\t 

.HvOOt*1rH<-00<TiO<yivOiHOOI^C 
CNmOr-O00OO00OOtH<T,00vDC 
00a^^~r~-^0<■00CN100vDr^0^Ov000C 



1 m <■ r-- m -^ r 

r 00 O vD vo 00 r 

) 00 CN r^ o r-> L 

\ <r o vo o cNi V 



C M O 4-» C r 



(U <U 4-1 > O ^-1 'H i 



^ 42 <U (U O I 



!^5<3c3 



>. 


o 


(U 


CO 






C 






(1) 


r^ 




V. 


JJ 




o 


o 


Q) 


H 




u 


0) 




ou 


o 




o 


<u 




^ 


en 




C 


•H 


m 


00 


o 


c 




o 




u 


01 



OUOQptiOffiffi^SPLiO'COC 



SELECTED SOCIAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION EXPENDITURES: 
FISCAL YEARS 1975 AND 1976 



TYPE OF CASE 



1976 



1975 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1975/1976 



Aid to Familiies with 
Dependent Children 

Foster Care Payments 

General Public Assistance 

General Public Assistance 
to Employables 

Public Assistance (Adults) 

Maintenance Assistance 

Food Stamp Administration 



(1) 



$278,615,405 $247,422,194 12.6 

151,362,255 134,544,625 12.5 

16,937,686 15,622,012 8.4 

20,460,219 16,557,583 23.6 

2,187,047 1,365,538 60.2 



471,793 361,849 

13,074,917 12,043,015 

6,775,598 5,049,510 



30.4 

8.6 

34.2 



'^Includes Assistance for Aged, Blind and Disabled Adults. 
Source: Maryland Department of Human Resources, Annual Report for 1975, 1976. 



-209- 



PL, <T. 




8 S ■ 



•K ^-' ^' 



SELECTED SOCIAL SERVICES CASELOAD FOR 
MARYLAND A^ID BALTIMORE CITY: MONTHLY 
AVERAGE FOR FISCAL YEARS 1975 AND 1976 







1976 




1975 






STATE 


CITY OF 


STATE 


CITY OF 


PROGRAM 


TOTAL 


BALTIMORE 


TOTAL 


BALTIMORE 


Aid to Families with 


212,793 


131,896 


211,921 


131,807 


Dependent Children 










General Public Assistance 


15,593 


11,403 


12,599 


9,003 


Foster Care of Children 


8,545 


4,367 


8,541 


4,460 


Emergency Assistance for 


1,949 


1,449 


1,939 


1,414 


Families with Children 










Public Assistance to 


1,445 


764 


918 


433 


Employables 










Public Assistance to 


656 


465 


N/A 


N/A 



Families with Dependent 
Children 



Public Assistance Supple- 
ments to Adults 



Public Assistance Supple- 
ments to Disabled 



Public Assistance Supple- 
ments to Blind 



45 
54 



N/A = Not Available. 

*Less than 0.1 

Source: Maryland Department of Human Resources, Annual Report for 1975 and 1976. 



o<tvom>^i— lomcor^ooocoo^^oooc^Jvoo^^ 
oocNLnoroint^coLn-vd-oor^cT>r^r^iH<fCN)vomr 
McNla^cMlnvo^oo-)(^Jln<f^oo-|^Ooo^Ot-^oo-<rr^- 

cTi m m .H iH M CO 



pq CO 



•.comm<roocNcv)r^ro^ino>( 
incNroojoo^o<T\mcNoovD< 



in vo <Ti ^r 1 
i r^ t— I CM iH ( 

<M >H CO .H 



ooa^o^I— ico-*roocsiOOcMOf^f^ior 
r^<fvoooo^ooo^^^oofomt^a^c^)Oo^- 
I— lvD«*vDOmv£)m>3■O^C3^v£)mmoo^O< 

r^ Csj <d- iH <!■ CO rH 



-. in rH rH r-- 
ri^i_)(j>0Om<TiCO 
■^CNlOOCOrHCNCncN 



a^ln<rOLnlnlnlnlnoOlnoooooo^>-^o-<J■Olnlnoo 
cMoo^Lninrvir-~cNif^OincsiOLnr^inincOrHocNor^i~^vov£) 
^r^ooino<roOCTNcncN<i-cNvDv£)cNCN^covo<r<rOf^cor-^ 



CO > ^ 
S Pj <r 



CX3 in 0-) 00 in r 



CN CO (Ti I— I 00 r^ - 



I t— I o I 

_ _ 1 00 00 r 

■) ON iH 00 -d- c^ o c 



cocom-d-OLnof^oo<-vovDOinovDvocNCMinc 
coooin-3-cricMooin<3-<H.H<rvOinoocorH<rcooic 

OCMCOrHCOCO I— Ir-I .-( COON 



M 3 



§>." 



iHinvooinininminooinoooooiHONOvDOininoo 
r-.iHLnin<jr^ogr^cNOinr-^Oincoininv£>ooor-^ocNicg<r<r 
>d-o>inr^o-<finr^oovoooocovorH<fr-^i-HCMinr^crioor^<a-f^ 

C0>X)v0CslCT\mOOCNlOC00000Or^f0CNI.H(TiCgO0N\£)O<N<f 

r~^.— iinooiHoo-vT-d-invDvo^csiovOCTNOOOi— lor^f^-^t-— ii— im 
rHinvo<rcoiHcotn<j-r^incjNcoo<tooocovocMO\Oinvoinr^ 

iHONiHOOONCrvfO-— ICTii 

r^csj<roov£>^^'^~'- 

r^ ON 00 tH CN rH 



1 rH r^ CO tH in c 



^f'^d-cjNr^coovor^va-c 



00 CO in CTN r 



• CTi rH o 00 00 r 



.r^oor-^c>o>ooincsii— ivDco^ 



PQ 

C. -. ^ „ 
4-1 (U M -H 
O -H 

O -i-l o 
H O U 















>-i 










^^ 


0) 


en 






p 


0) 












<u ^ 










c 








O 






cu 


















go 


^ 


>N 








o 




n 






m 


CO -H 




X) 








(U 






Fl 


u 








aj 


01 v^ 




t-l 


Td 




O (U 




CO 


en 




c 


•H 


<u 


.H 


o 






^ 0) 


(U 


o 


)-l 




t>0 o 


d 


IS 


M 


O 


•H 




> 


o 


u 






O X) 


t-l 




CO 




■u c 


(U 




(U 


^ 


^ 




rH 


u 


u 


o 


cfl 


M 0) 


u 


u 


rs 


c 


C -H 


(1) 




(d 




tn 


crt 


Cfl 


01 


cfl 


0) 


r. 


o u 


m 


CO 


n 


(1) 


o u 


3 




O 


CO 


CO 


PQ 


CJ 


o 


u 


u 


CJ 


p pti 


o 


PC 


X 


fc^ 


X P^ 


w 


CO 


CO 


H 


^ 



H PS H Pj 
O W O W 
H PM H W 



O ^ 00 ro cs 



in o 



CO <• O O rH 

vD ro vo t^ r^ 

CO CTn vO O C-J 

00 o m ON r^ 

CM r^ CM in 00 

,H CO r^ vo in 



CO ov o O iH 
vo 00 \o r^ r^ 
CO o o o CM 



< 00 r~~ vo in 



o .H 



1-5 U hJ is 

<: , -^ w 

H Pi H P4 

O W O R 



O QJ !-i O 



CO > C S C O 

•H 0) M M W -H 1-H 



00 CO 

d o 



v£5 t-H 


00 


ON 


in 




r-- 


y£> 


iH 


r- o 


<r 00 


oo 


o 


<t 








vO 


CO 00 


ON <r 


o 


o 


■-I 




CsJ 


m 


O 


vo in 


00 r^ 


00 


fN 


^o 


1 


vD 


00 


CM 


O CM 


vO rH 


CO 


CO 






r- 




I— 1 


r^ r^ 


.H in 


<r 


CO 


o 






CM 


^ 


00 


CO 


<f 


o 


^ 










^ 


\£) r^ 


00 


CTN 


in 




,^ 


vD 


^ 


00 v£) 


<f r^ 


00 


O 


<r 






t^ 


vi3 


r-< 00 


ON VO 


o 


vO 




^ 


CM 


in 


O 


CM in 


00 Csl 


00 


CN 


VO 


CM 


vD 


00 


CM 


vo" rg 


VD CNJ 






-H 












r-\ ON 


o- 


CO 


o 






CM 


vO 


in 



XlC4-)(l)4-l(-lQC<C 



S 0) C O 



c: C rt cd co^-' 



c >-i a <u c <u 
0) o B c o s 
o ^ w ;=) u 



B o c ex. H -H 



cflta ccpQ cx,cx<;w-u 
S Z w en CO o 



ENERGY 

As the days of cheap and apparently plentiful energy came to a rather 
abrupt end recently, public awareness of the problems rose dramatically. 

Demand for natural gas energy grew by nearly 18 per cent from 1966 to 1976 
in terms of the number of customers. But, in recent years the demand is really 
not shown in the traditional way as moratoria by the utility companies have 
forbidden new gas hookups. Conservation measures, higher prices, weather, and 
the national recession all combined over the period from 1973 to 1975 to re- 
duce the quantity of natural gas consumed. 

Total commercial and industrial electric sales rose nearly 97 per cent 
from 1966 to 1976. After a drop during the 1973 - 1975 period, sales increased 
by some 12 per cent from 1975 to 1976. Virtually all of the installed generat- 
ing capacity is privately owned. 

Much of the public interest has been devoted to the motor vehicle gasoline 
situation. Data show that after an absolute reduction in the gallonage sold in 
Maryland and in the Nation during 1974 the number of gallons sold increased in 
1975 and 1976 (a rise of 3.8 per cent from 1975 to 1976). The average price 
for regular grade gasoline sold in the Baltimore metropolitan area rose from 
40.9 cents in October 1973 to 63.1 cents in July 1977. Premium gasoline rose 
from 44.8 to 68.3 cents per gallon over the same period. Prices in this area 
were consistently higher than national averages. 

The telephone continues to play an increasingly dominant role in communi- 
cation. There are nearly one and one-half million accounts with almost 3.1 
million telephones in the State. Continued expansion is promised what with 
the growing usage of the telephone for data processing and consumer services. 



-214- 



tH I— 1 


vO fvj 


CN VO 


CM v£> 


r~! d 

rH CM 


in 00 

CM Osl 



vD O 



m CX5 

o CO 



o fo 



vo o 



O 00 
CO ^D 



-d- o 



r^ 00 

00 CN 



CM o 
00 CN 



in o 

<r vD 



o ^ 



00 CO 


rH 


vO 


o 


CT^ 


r-- 


r-- 




iH rH 


in 


in 

rH 


CO 
vO 


00 
vO 


CO 
rH 


CO 
00 

T-i 




<t r^ 


r^ 


a\ 


00 


o 


in 


in 


rH in 


CN CM 


in 

rH 


d 
in 


VO 


00 
VO 
rH 


r-^ 


CN 
00 


r^ 00 

cy> o 

rH CN 


<!■ VO 


r-. 


<t 


00 


CJ^ 


00 


r-- 


VO 00 


CN in 

CM CM 

rH rH 


in 

rH 


0^ 

rH 


VO 


vO 
rH 


rH 
rH 


rH 
00 


C3^ rH 
00 O 
rH CN 


r- <r 


r-^ 


VO 


00 


in 


v£> 


CM 


<y\ Cvl 


rH in 




00 


VO 


in 

VO 


fi 


o 

00 


00 O 
00 O 



vO vO 

CJ^ <r 
in vo 



O CO 
CM C7^ 



GAS UTILITY INDUSTRY, CUSTOMERS AND REVENUES, MARYLAND: 
1970-1976 AND 1966 









CUSTOMERS (1 


,000) (1) 




REVENUES ($1 


,000,000) 


(2) 


YEAR AND 




















PER CENT 




(3) 


RESI- 


COMMER- 


INDUS- 


total(^> 


RESI- 


COMMER- 


INDUS- 


CHANGE 


TOTAL 


DENTIAL 


CIAL 


TRIAL 


DENTIAL 


CIAL 


TRIAL 


1976 (P> 


773 




719 


48 


5 


326 


190 


57 


73 


1975 


775 




720 


49 


5 


273 


162 


46 


60 


1974 


770 




715 


49 


5 


231 


133 


38 


56 


1973 


760 




706 


48 


6 


206 


122 


29 


52 


1972 


744 




690 


47 


5 


205 


123 


28 


51 


1971 


72 6 




674 


46 


5 


180 


112 


24 


42 


1970 


713 




662 


45 


5 


164 


105 


22 


35 


1966 


657 




612 


41 


3 


126 


86 


15 


24 


Per Cent 




















Change 




















1975/1976 


-0.3 




-0.1 


-2.0 


0.0 


19.4 


17.3 


23.9 


21.7 


1966/1976 


17.7 




17.5 


17.1 


66.7 


158.7 


120.9 


280.0 


204.2 



(p) 



Preliminary. 



(1) 



Annual Averages. 



(2) 



Excludes sales for resale. 



(3) 



Includes "Other" service, not shown separately. 



Source: American Gas Association, Gas Facts , 1975, 1976 data. Historical Statistics 
of the Gas Utility Industry 1966-1975 . 



-216- 



NO. 158 

NATURAL GAS CONSUMPTION, IN THE 
UNITED STATES, SOUTH ATLANTIC REGION, MARYLAND AND 
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: 1973, 1974, 1975 



1973 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1974/1975 1973/1974 



QUANTITY 

(Mil. Cu. Ft.) 
United States 

South Atlantic 



(1) 



Maryland and 
District of Columbia 



20,409,875 22,110,623 22,965,914 

1,327,143 1,450,788 1,549,993 

165,932 199,331 201,961 



-7.7 


-3.7 


-8.5 


-6.4 


-16.8 


-1.3 



VALUE 

($1,000) 
United States 

South Atlantic 

Maryland and 
District of Columbia 



22,351,956 18,102,301 15,280,792 

1,683,054 1,352,609 1,345,589 

327,525 295,928 251,366 



23.5 


18.5 


24.4 


0.5 


10.7 


17.7 



Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland and D. C. , North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Virginia, West Virginia. 

Source: U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, Natural Gas, Annual , 1975, 
1974, 1973. 



NO. 159 

INSTALLED GENERATING CAPACITY AND PRODUCTION OF ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND 

INSTALLED PLANTS BY CLASS OF OWNERSHIP AND TYPE OF PRIME MOVER, MARYLAND: 

1974 AND 1976 



TYPE OF PRIME MOVER 



CLASS OF OWNERSHIP 
OF ELECTRIC UTILITIES 







ELECTRIC 


UTILITIES 




PRIVATELY 


PUBLICLY 


ITEM 


TOTAL 


FUEL 


HYDRO 


INDUSTRIAL 


TOTAL OWNED 


OWNED 


Installed 














Capacity 
(000 KW) 
1976 


8,376 


7,670 


494 


212 


8,164 8,100 


64 


1974 


6,973 


6,267 


494 


212 


6,761 6,694 


67 


Per Cent 














Change 
1974/1976 


20.1 


22.4 


0.0 


0.0 


20.8 21.0 


-4.5 


Production 














(000,000 KWH) 
1976 


32,338 


29,146 


2,088 


1,104 


31,235 31,185 


50 


1974 


30,087 


26,852 


1,969 


1,266 


28,821 28,734 


87 


Per Cent 














Change 
1974/1976 


7.5 


8.5 


6.0 


-12.8 


8.4 8.5 


-42.5 


Source: Federal Power 


Commission. 


The Division of Power 


Surveys and Analyses, National 


Elect] 


ric Power 


Production 


Generating 


Capacity, and Fuel Consumption, 


Annual 



publication releases June 1, 1976 and March 25, 1977. 



COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC SALES IN MARYLAND: 
1966-1976 



TOTAL COMMERCIAL 

AND INDUSTRIAL 

SALES (MILLION KWHR) 



19,359 
17,238 
17,399 
18,041 
16,598 
15,803 
14,551 
13,061 
11,856 
10,824 
9,852 



COMMERCIAL 


SALES 


INDUSTRIAL 


(MILLION KWHR) 


(MILLION I 


7,407 




11,952 


7,168 




10,070 


6,777 




10,622 


7,033 




11,008 


6,424 




10,174 


5,930 




9,873 


5,570 




8,981 


5,107 




7,954 


4,629 




7,227 


4,122 




6,702 


3,714 




6,138 



12.3 
96.5 



3.3 
99.4 



18.7 

94.7 



Edison Electric Institute. 



GROSS GALLONS OF MOTOR GASOLINE SOLD,* MARYLAND AND THE UNITED STATES 
1972-1976 



MARYLAND 

PER CENT 
CHANGE OVER 
PRECEDING 
(1,000) YEAR 



UNITED STATES 





PER CENT 




CHANGE OVER 




PRECEDING 


(1,000) 


YEAR 


109,655,206 


5.2 


104,271,488 


2.4 


101,855,749 


-3.7 


105,759,344 


4.2 


101,476,934 


_ 



1976 


1,914,355 


3.8 


1975 


1,844,873 


3.1 


1974 


1,789,440 


-4.5 


1973 


1,873,384 


4.3 


1972 


1,796,502 


- 



*State taxation reports at the wholesale level are the basis of the data. 



Source: U. S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Monthly Motor 
Gasoline Reported by States , MF-33G series. Year End Summaries. 





vO 


vO 


vO 


vD 


NO 
















v£> 


^ 


NO 


ON 

00 

NO 


ON 
00 
NO 














7N <n 


\D 


<3- 


NO 


NO 


NO 


ON 
NO 


in 

NO 


rH 

in 

NO 


o 
in 

NO 


00 
NO 










O 


in 
in 

NO 


NO 

in 

NO 


o 

NO 
NO 


in 

NO 


NO 


NO 


NO 


o 




in 


00 


ON 


o 

NO 


NO 


NO 


ON 

m 

NO 


NO 
NO 


NO 


o 
CO 

NO 




o in 


00 

ON 

in 


O 


vO 


ON 

CN 

NO 


ON 
NO 


00 

in 

NO 


NO 
NO 


0^ 

NO 


ON 
NO 


CO 
NO 


a 
a 

I' 
c 




v^ 


in 


ON 

in 

vO 


in 

NO 
NO 


NO 
NO 












I 





■D ^ 
-0- 


00 


o 


in 

NO 


NO 
NO 


NO 
NO 
NO 












c 

] 


n o 
=> o 


(TV 


ON 


o 
o 

NO 


NO 


NO 


00 

NO 


NO 


ON 
NO 


ON 

NO 


NO 

NO 


7 


H O 
3 O 


ON 
ON 


r^ 


NO 


On 

NO 


00 

NO 


NO 


o 

CO 

NO 


00 

NO 


NO 


NO 


f 
c 
i 

i 

c 




vO 


ON 

NO 


NO 
NO 


o 

NO 


NO 












c 

1 
c 




vO 


00 

NO 


NO 


CO 

NO 


NO 












] 


<r 00 
in in 
co- 


ON 


vO 


NO 

in 


On 


ON 
ON 


O 

NO 


<3- 


CO 


CN 

o 

NO 


o 
o 

NO 


•■ 


00 vO 
CTn 00 

in in 


-<r 


^ 


NO 

00 

in 


O 

NO 


o 

NO 


NO 


NO 


o 

NO 


00 

o 

NO 


o 

NO 


" 


ro en 
m in 


in 


o 


o 
in 


NO 


ON 


in 

ON 


ON 


ON 


C7N 
00 


NO 

00 

in 




> 
< 

4 


o <r 
in in 
in in 


in 
in 


o 


r-- 


00 

tn 


§ 


in 

NO 


NO 


NO 


i 


00 

ON 

in 


c 




o 






0) 

§ 




w 

00 


0) 

-i 

a 


u 

0) 

o 

o 
o 


0) 

o 


o 


< 
p 



'^^ 



u 


H 




1=1 




o 


Pi 


Q 


o 


H 


3 


o 


CO 


W 




2; 
o 


^ 


</> 


u 


W 





■CO- </> </> 



0) . 
> vO 



Pi O 

>H o 

<: o 



</></></> 



^ 2 



THE PORT OF BALTIMORE 

The Port of Baltimore ranks as the fourth largest foreign trade port in 
the United States. In 1976, 34,595,827 short tons of cargo valuing over $8.2 
billion were handled. Exports show an increase over 1975 of 7.8 per cent in 
tonnage and 4.6 per cent in value; imports decreased by 12.2 per cent in tonnage 
and 4.9 per cent in value. 

Although the export tonnage represents only 43 per cent of the total 
tonnage, its value is nearly 63 per cent of the total value. This fact is due 
to the more sophisticated nature of the manufactured devices primarily in 
export as opposed to the bulk commodities and raw materials being imported. 

In terms of import tonnage the principal countries of lading on foreign 
commerce are Canada, Venezuela, Brazil, and Liberia, but in value West Germany, 
Japan, the United Kingdom, and Venezuela lead, in that order. Broken into 
trade areas, Europe has a lead in value and tonnage, and is our principal 
trader. 

The use of containerization is growing markedly, and within the port, 
facilities built for this purpose are being used more readily. The Maryland 
Port Administration is presently constructing additional public container 
facilities at Locust Point to supplement existing container facilities at the 
recently expanded Dundalk Marine Terminal and the Canton facility. In addition, 
private enterprise has already dedicated a major container facility in the 
Baltimore Port. Gantry and giant bridge cranes serve these facilities. The 
response of shippers to the Port's containerization programs has been quite 
impressive and a tribute to the facilities. 



-223- 





vD 


00 


vO 


00 










00 


CO 


o 








vO 


■<r 






in 


ON 


<r 


W O 


00 


vO 


in 


in 


eg 




O 




vD 


•<r 


to o 






















hJ - 




vO 


<t- 


r^ 




VD 


VD 


CM 


o 




< -H 


r>- 


-d- 






CO 




Vt 




00 


o 


> </> 




ON 


in 




»d- 






00 


vD 


vD 


























LO 




CO 


















■co- 










































W 


-<r 


o 




O 


r^ 


00 


00 


CTn 


vD 


CJN 


PQ 


o 




<r 


ON 




1—1 




<3N 


<r 




W hJ 


vD 


00 


CM 


o 


CO 




o 


vO 


00 


r^ 


o 






















<: o 


<t 


oo" 


vO 


r-\ 


vD 






o" 


CO 


CM 






vO 










00 




ON 


<f 




0^ 


00 


00 






>d- 




ON 






o - 






















H 04 


<■ 






o 


00 


VD 


CJN 


in 


in 


<r 




M 






.-( 
















ON 


00 




VD 




<r 


vD 


r^ 


00 


vD 


W O 


-^ 




CT^ 






m 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 


;=> o 


CO 




O 


>d- 




ON 


<r 


vD 


o 


vD 


^°- 


in 


c^ 


m 


vD 


o" 


vD 


rH 


vD 


<r 


vo" 


> rH 




CO 


o 


00 


<r 


in 


CM 


ON 


00 


VD 


</> , 


o 




vO 


CO 


ON^ 


vO 


<-^ 


O 


o^ 


00 


























(T) 




CO 


CM 




iH 




<-\ 


tH 






</> 










































CO 


CO 




o 




a\ 


O 


■<t 


vD 






PQ 


(N 




vO 




o 




-d- 


in 


in 


00 


W J 










CO 




00 








O 






















< o 


.-H 


Csl 


o 


O 


ON 


o 


in 


ON 


00 




2 o 




r^ 


l-\ 




ON 




o 


o 


CTN 




g o 


vO 


CO 




CM 


ON 




o 




00 


CO 


O " 






















H CM 


ON 




00 


-d- 


o' 


o 




o 


oC 


00 






CM 


CM 


eg 


CM 


eg 


CM 










lO 


vD 




<a- 


ON 


VD 






VD 


ON 


W O 


CM 


in 










o 


•^ 


CO 


r-- 


t3 O 


CM 




vD 


o 


<t 


in 


in 


ON 


r>. 


O 


^ o 






















<: - 


CT^ 


CJN 


0^ 


<f 


.H 


co" 


r^ 


00 


<r 


00 


> M 


<r 


r^ 




o 






vD 


CO 


vD 


vD 




CM 




I— 1 




CO 




vD 


ON 




•<r 


























00 


00 


r-. 


-3- 


CO 










.H 




<n- 














































CO 






v^ 


00 


CM 




CO 


O 


PQ 




ON 


O 


vO 


<• 


00 




in 


o 


vD 


W hJ 


00 


o 


vO 


CJN 


VO 


o 


CT^ 


-^ 




in 


O 






















< O 


in 


<-{ 


vo" 




in 


vD 


O 


o' 




o 


z o 


o> 


<r 


00 






C7N 


as 


in 


On 


00 


S o 


in 




CJN 


in 




.H 


CO 






°°„ 


o •> 






















H CM 


<a- 


v£> 


o" 


<r 


CJN 






vD 


m 








CO 


<r 


CO 


CM 








CM 


CM 




\D 


in 








r-{ 


o 


CJN 


00 


r^ 




r^ 


r^ 






r-^ 




r~~ 


vO 


vD 


vD 




a\ 


CJN 


ON 


o^ 


CJN 


a\ 


C7N 


ON 


CJN 


CJN 


>> 












r-l 






.H 


■H 



-224- 



IMPORT TRADE OF THE PORT OF BALTIMORE ARRANGED BY PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES 
AND BY TRADE AREAS: 1976 





COUNTRY OF ORIGIN 






COUNTRY OF ORIGIN 




IN ORDER OF TONNAGE 


SHORT TONS 


IN ORDER OF 


VALUE 


VALUE 


Canada 


4 


,625,152 


West German) 




$510,841,677 


Venezuela 


4 


,390,318 


Japan 




478,987,692 


Brazil 


3 


,329,685 


United Kingdom 


299,838,250 


Liberia 


1 


,197,674 


Venezuela 




181,027,412 


Australia 




753,136 


Brazil 




139,732,737 


Netherlands Antilles 




655,019 


France 




130,534,929 


Trinidad and Tobago 




478,686 


Canada 




106,512,811 


Japan 




437,324 


Sweden 




97,060,532 


Rumania 




311,448 


Italy 




88,580,911 


Colombia 




301,246 


Dominican Republic 


70,875,924 


Republic of South Africa 




256,268 


Republic of 


South Africa 


68,133,907 


Dominican Republic 




202,808 


Australia 




60,061,692 


West Germany 




202,396 


Republic of 


China - Taiwan 59,858,302 


Bahamas 




161,936 


Spain 




51,406,955 


Guiana 




152,580 


Philippines 




46,282,704 


Italy 




148,335 


Belgium and 


Luxembourg 


40,580,616 


United Kingdom 




145,794 


Netherlands 


Antilles 


35,808,420 


Peru 




127,934 


Trinidad and Tobago 


32,530,752 


France 




125,723 


Liberia 




28,579,260 


Philippines 




124,734 


Hong Kong 




27,240,507 


India 




119,683 


Republic of 


Korea 


26,262,645 


Indonesia 




106,435 


Netherlands 




25,839,958 


Republic of China - Taiwan 




80,555 


Indonesia 




25,705,795 


Costa Rica 




71,385 


Rumania 




24,504,757 


Spain 




70,127 


Peru 




24,292,930 


Netherlands 




60,264 


Colombia 




23,550,945 


Honduras 




59,518 


Switzerland 




22,938,943 


Greece 




52,381 


French Pacif 


'ic Islands 


18,625,851 


Thailand 




48,759 


Argentina 




17,977,615 


Finland 




47,856 


Finland 




17,888,991 






IMPORTS BY 


TRADE AREA 








SHORT TONS 






VALUE 


South America 


8 


,428,415 






$ 425,253,278 


North America 


6 


,376,465 






287,464,073 


Africa 


1 


,612,975 






132,619,815 


Europe 


1 


,441,895 






1,428,921,322 


Asia 


1 


,019,592 






722,397,779 


Australia and Oceania 




771,881 






78,692,468 


Total 


19 


,651,223 






$3,075,348,735 


Source: Maryland Port Autho: 


rity 
Mar^ 


, Foreign ( 


Commerce Statistical Report, 


Port of 


Baltimore and Other 


/land Port: 


s, 1976. 







EXPORT TRADE OF THE PORT OF BALTIMORE ARRANGED BY PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES 
AND BY TRADE AREAS: 1976 





COUNTRY OF UNLADING 






COUNTRY OF UNLADING 




IN ORDER OF TONNAGE 


SHORT TONS 


IN ORDER OF 


VALUE 


VALUE 


Japan 


3 


,849,570 


Saudi Arabia 




$436,399,774 


Russia 


1 


,478,063 


West Germany 




346,260,731 


Belgium and Luxembourg 


1 


,432,496 


Japan 




305,782,610 


United Kingdom 




852,118 


United Kingc 


lom 


283,562,812 


Netherlands 




779,985 


Belgium and 


Luxembourg 


268,393,417 


France 




611,012 


Russia 




267,839,217 


West Germany 




547,893 


France 




266,816,570 


Spain 




520,128 


Venezuela 




263,855,512 


Poland 




511,330 


Iran 




250,186,265 


Italy 




482,596 


Brazil 




202,761,140 


Egypt 




428,189 


Netherlands 




196,582,345 


Brazil 




299,380 


Italy 




155,851,712 


India 




272,621 


Spain 




132,200,460 


Portugal 




228,762 


Republic of 


South Africa 


106,607,567 


Argentina 




213,692 


Sweden 




90,833,411 


Saudi Arabia 




206,716 


Colombia 




85,982,991 


Sweden 




189,850 


Poland 




76,168,324 


Israel 




183,916 


Republic of 


China - Taiwan 64,764,690 


Republic of Korea 




172,011 


Israel 




62,041,206 


Venezuela 




167,456 


Kuwait 




60,716,632 


Iran 




158,102 


Switzerland 




59,886,291 


Pakistan 




147,577 


Indonesia 




59,667,833 


Bulgaria 




81,513 


Peru 




54,692,302 


Algeria 




71,612 


United Arab 


Emirates 


50,790,456 


Denmark 




59,984 


Hong Kong 




50,129,020 


Norway 




59,279 


Egypt 




50,119,479 


Republic of China - Taiwan 




55,818 


Argentina 




49,958,248 


Rumania 




55,814 


Nigeria 




49,234,059 


Colombia 




46,700 


India 




48,038,843 


Peru 




43.352 


Republic of 


Korea 


45,641,348 






EXPORTS 


BY TRADE AREA 








SHORT TONS 






VALUE 


Europe 


8 


,033,445 






$2,342,454,839 


Asia 


5 


,281,342 






1,686,468,063 


South America 




827,416 






727,322,738 


Africa 




668,479 






348,848,850 


North America 




77,473 






29,056,179 


Australia and Oceania 




18,468 






39,725,812 


Unidentified Trade Areas 




37,981 






- 


Total 


14 


,944,604 






$5,173,876,481 


Source: Maryland Port Authority 


, Foreign 


Commerce Statistical Report, 


Port of 


Baltimore and Other 


Itoryland Port 


s, 1976. 







RANKING OF PRINCIPAL UNITED STATES SEAPORTS IN 
FOREIGN WATERBORNE TRADE, IMPORT TONNAGE: 19 74, 1975 AND 1976 
(in Thousands of Short Tons) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1975/1976 1974/1976 



United States 


5 38,172 


451,122 


468,348 


19.3 


14.9 


New York, N. Y. 


56,430 


51,013 


61,575 


10.6 


-8.4 


Baton Rouge, La. 


47,926 


32,226 


22,130 


48.7 


116.6 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


32,542 


39,762 


43,454 


-18.2 


-25.1 


Houston, Tex. 


26,934 


18,274 


18,763 


47.4 


43.5 


Portland, Me. 


20,002 


23,158 


22,351 


-13.6 


-10.5 


BALTIMORE, MD. 


19,651 


22,372 


28,110 


-12.2 


-30.1 


Corpus Christi, Tex. 


19,236 


16,012 


11,053 


20.1 


74.0 


Mobile, Ala. 


16,981 


13,614 


10,978 


24.7 


54.7 


New Orleans, La. 


15 , 740 


11,654 


12,690 


35.1 


24.0 


Long Beach, Cal. 


14,950 


11,541 


11,942 


29.5 


25.2 


Marcus Hook, Pa. 


14,626 


12,249 


9,439 


19.4 


55.0 


Paulsboro, N. J. 


12,060 


11,824 


13,202 


2.0 


-8.7 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


11,346 


13,130 


10,398 


-13.6 


9.1 


Boston, Mass. 


7,134 


5,988 


8,398 


19.1 


-15.1 


Norfolk, Va. 


6,516 


6,462 


8,913 


8.4 


-26.9 



NO. 168 

RANKING OF PRINCIPAL UNITED STATES SEAPORTS IN 

FOREIGN WATERBORNE TRADE, IMPORT VALUE: 1974, 1975 AND 1976 

(In Millions of Dollars) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1975/1976 1974/1976 



United States 


$85,602 


$65,894 


$68,697 


29.9 


24.6 


New York 


17,995 


14,744 


16,794 


22.0 


7.2 


Long Beach, Cal. 


4,792 


3,310 


3,427 


44.8 


39.8 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


4,709 


3,634 


3,897 


29.6 


20.8 


Baton Rouge, La. 


4,059 


2,575 


1,564 


57.6 


159.5 


Houston, Tex. 


4,058 


3,167 


3,046 


28.1 


33.2 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


3,482 


3,512 


3,919 


-0.9 


-11.2 


New Orleans, La. 


3,472 


2,901 


3,044 


19.7 ■ 


14.1 


Seattle, Wash. 


3,382 


2,304 


2,430 


46.8 


39.2 


BALTIMORE, MD. 


3,075 


3,233 


3,605 


-4.9 


-14.7 


Norfolk, Va. 


2,196 


1,592 


1,833 


37.9 


19.8 


Oakland, Cal. 


1,736 


1,218 


1,289 


42.5 


34.7 


Corpus Christi, Tex, 


1,416 


1,068 


741 


32.6 


91.1 


Marcus Hook, Pa. 


1,203 


916 


738 


31.3 


63.0 


Jacksonville, Fla. 


1,150 


899 


962 


27.9 


19.5 


Boston, Mass. 


1,148 


1,010 


1,311 


13.7 


-12.4 


Source: Maryland ] 


Port Administration, 


, Foreign Commerce Statistical 


Report, 


Port of 


Baltimore 


and Other Maryland 


Ports, 1975, 


1976. 







RANKING OF PRINCIPAL UNITED STATES SEAPORTS IN 
FOREIGN WATERBORNE TRADE, EXPORT TONNAGE: 1974, 1975 AND 1976 
(In Thousands of Short Tons) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1975/1976 1974/1976 



United States 


284,686 


270,876 


266,531 


5.1 


6.8 


Norfolk, Va. 


31,021 


31,998 


33,318 


-3.1 


-6.9 


New Orleans, La. 


21,230 


19,914 


20,677 


6.6 


2.7 


Destrehan, La. 


18,600 


14,122 


14,264 


31.7 


30.4 


Houston, Tex. 


14,968 


17,984 


15,922 


-16.8 


-6.0 


BALTIMORE, MD. 


14,945 


13,869 


12,876 


7.8 


16.1 


Tampa, Fla. 


12,120 


12,686 


12,890 


-4.5 


-6.0 


Baton Rouge, La. 


9,590 


8,335 


7,662 


15.1 


25.2 


Newport News, Va. 


8,960 


11,388 


10,572 


-21.3 


-15.2 


Portland, Ore. 


7,440 


6,624 


6,852 


12.3 


8.6 


New York, N. Y. 


6,249 


6,744 


7,912 


-7.3 


-21.0 


Mobile, Ala. 


5,762 


5,437 


3,966 


6.0 


45.3 


Long Beach, Cal. 


5,576 


5,573 


6,118 


0.1 


-8.9 


Tacoma, Wash. 


5,492 


4,127 


3,515 


33.1 


56.2 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


4,874 


5,125 


6,269 


-4.9 


-22.3 


Corpus Christi, Tex. 


4,306 


5,167 


4,600 


-16.7 


-6.4 



RANKING OF PRINCIPAL UNITED STATES SEAPORTS IN 

FOREIGN WATERBORNE TRADE, EXPORT VALUE: 1974, 1975 AND 1976 

(In Millions of Dollars) 



1976 



1974 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1975/1976 1974/1976 



United States 


$66,410 




$62,867 


$56,583 




5.6 


17.4 


New York, N. Y. 


11,714 




11,815 


10,741 




-0.9 


9.1 


Houston, Tex. 


5,505 




5,897 


4,810 




-6.6 


14.4 


New Orleans, La. 


5,179 




5,445 


5,146 




-4.9 


0.6 


BALTIMORE, MD. 


5,174 




4,947 


3,555 




4.6 


45.5 


Norfolk, Va. 


4,551 




4,002 


3,739 




13.7 


21.7 


Destrehan, La. 


2,690 




2,221 


2,203 




21.1 


22.1 


Oakland, Cal. 


2,031 




1,497 


1,231 




35.7 


65.0 


Long Beach, Cal. 


1,792 




1,497 


1,187 




19.7 


51.0 


Los Angeles, Cal. 


1,733 




1,443 


1,354 




20.1 


28.0 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1,727 




1,883 


1,692 




-8.3 


2.1 


Baton Rouge, La. 


1,330 




1,175 


1,138 




13.2 


16.9 


Charleston, S. C. 


1,321 




809 


738 




63.3 


79.0 


Galveston, Tex. 


1,104 




892 


1,077 




23.8 


2.5 


Portland, Ore. 


1,051 




1,011 


1,141 




4.0 


-7.9 


Seattle, Wash. 


871 




722 


672 




20.6 


29.6 


Source: Maryland Port 


Authority, 


Foreign Commerce 


Statistical 


Report 


, Port of 




Baltimore and 


Other Maryland 


Ports, 1975, 


1976. 









w o 



CO .U (U 

VJ C 4J 

0) m eg 



y^ 


4j 


1 


^ 


bO 


CO CU 


O 




CO 


<u 


C 


C -u 


O. 


CO • 


c 


JC 




0) 1 M 


03 


^ U 


CO 


& 


TJ 




c 


3 


u 


(U 


3 




c3 


C • 


H 


CO 




M 


^« 






o 


u o 


H 


TJ 


0) 


C 


14-1 CO W) 






c 




•H 


O U QJ 


X) 


cn 2: 


CO 


u 






c 


3 




o 


Xl 


iJ 73 CO 


CO -u 


O " 


CO 


c 


(1) 


c <u cj 




q; CO 


cu 




•H 


cu rH 


>. (U 


c oj 




CO 




S rH rH 




CO iH 




c 


•H 


■U O CO 


OJ Qu 


i-l o 




o 


CO 


>-i }-i -H 


C "H 


.H -H 


-5 


•H 


CO 


CO -U O 



^ ^ 



CO ex C (U 
.H CU O D. 
O Q O CO 



vO 00 vO 

r~ CO -vT 
r- vo CO 



O ro r-^ 
eg vo vO 
m r^ ^D 



r-. ro in 

CO CO r^ 

<r CM vo 

r-~ o o> 

<f CM <r 

<r «d- in 



>d- in r-- o <t 

in <}■ CM CJ^ o 

o 00 a^ \o <-i 



-<r c^ in 
00 00 <r 
in in vo 



iH -* a^ CO 
CO CO xX) 



o sa- 
in CO 



<r <t 00 o o r-. 

CM ~^ O r^ O CTi 



in vD 

CO CN 

00 r-- 

00 in 



h4 O (U 3 -H ,H 



O M Pd O Q 



^ 






QJ CC (U a >-i • -H 


!^ 






t-i QJ -H -H PL, O CJ 


CO 






O U O 3 . < 


H 






Cd -H cr iH w 
a) tU >-i X! W .H • o 


" M 


m 




C en 4J 0) H 3 -H 
o(UC> "Svj 


4J 01 


C 




-H x: 


CO 




•U C <D W "3 


rt a 


0) 


M 


mcoot-iuCcn^ 


rC 4J 


J3 


CO 


(UMCOt-i-HiJCl. 
eCQWcOCOOrH 


CX-H 


>, 


60 


CO PL, 


o 


3 


•HcguOCL,M33 
hJ S IS O W 


<: 


C/D 


W 



(u r-i 43 >-i o j:: <u 
^ o e 43 >-i o iH 

O c/3 3 CO PL, ^ W 



WATERBORNE COMMERCE OF THE PRINCIPAL WATERWAYS IN >1ARYLAND, 
IN SHORT TONS: 1967 AND 1974 









PER CENT CHANGE 


1974 




1967 


1967/1974 


62,579,974 


42 


,759,411 


46.4 


59,891,068 


40 


,737,903 


47.0 


2,688,906 


2 


,021,508 


33.0 


103,604 




60,226 


72.0 


199,301 




140,307 


42.0 


366,656 




302,024 


21.4 


124,183 




122,681 


1.2 


789,748 




383,652 


105.9 


770,588 




722,448 


6.7 


7,472 




29,904 


-75.0 


209,509 




176,669 


18.6 


679 




4,859 


-86.0 


117,166 




78,738 


48.8 



Total Principal Waterways 

Baltimore Harbor and Channels 

Total Other Principal Waterways 

Chester River, Maryland 
Tred Avon River, Maryland 
Choptank River, Maryland 
Cambridge Harbor, Maryland 
Nanticoke River, Delaware 

and Maryland 
Wicomico River, Maryland 

(Eastern Shore) 
Crisfield Harbor, Maryland 
Pocomoke River, Maryland 
Chincoteague Bay, Maryland 

and Virginia 
On the Coast of Virginia 

from Chesapeake Bay to 

Chincoteague Bay, Virginia 

Source: U. S. Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers, Waterborne Commerce of the 
United States: Part I, Waterways and Harbors, Atlantic Coast , 1974 and 1967. 



WATERBORNE COMMERCE OF THE BALTIMORE HARBOR AND CHANNELS /^^ 
IN SHORT TONS: 1964-1974 



YEAR 



TONNAGE 



PASSENGERS 



1974 
1973 
1972 
1971 
1970 
1969 
1968 
1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 



59,891,068 
53,786,715 
45,798,776 
44,002,785 
51,084,394 
43,917,369 
42,459,113 
40,737,903 
43,876,778 
44,267,160 
48,220,024 



176,944 
182,579 
128,410 

98,347 
175,753 
203,365 
201,210 
178,974 
166,123 
128,324 

93,392 



(1) 



Section included is the mouth of the Patapsco River to Baltimore, Maryland. 



Source: U. S. Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers, Waterborne Commerce of the 
United States: Part I, Waterways and Harbors, Atlantic Coast , 1974. 



AIR TRAVEL 

Baltimore-Washington International Airport serves as the major commercial 
air facility in the State. This operation is owned by the State of Maryland, 
and it is operated by the Maryland Department of Transportation. 

During 1976, nearly 3 million passengers were handled on more than 
230,000 air traffic operations. Freight traffic totalled almost 97 million 
pounds, and a significant volume of mail was loaded and unloaded at the 
facility. In November 1975 Express service was discontinued due to legisla- 
tion, adding to freight, mail and passenger operation totals. Total freight 
operations showed a slight increase over 1974, although did not reach 1972 
levels. Most other types of operations showed a healthy increase over 1974. 

Worthy of mention are the facts that an expansion program is currently 
underway for both passenger and freight operations at the facility. Also, 
plans are underway as of this writing for the construction of a train station 
along the Amtrak mainline just one and one-half miles from BWI, with the 
station to be used for boarding and disembarking passengers to and from 
Baltimore, Washington, and other points in the corridor. 

In addition to BWI, a listing of airports and heliports in Maryland shows 
41 other facilities, spread out among 23 of the State's 24 political subdivisions. 
Scheduled operations serve several of these locations. 



-2 33- 



NO. 175 

BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT OPERATIONS: 1972 AND 1976 



TYPE OF OPERATION 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1972/1976 



Total Passengers 
Deplaning 
Enplaning 
Chartered 

Total Mail (Pounds) 
Deplaning 
Enplaning 

Total Express (Pounds) 
Deplaning 
Enplaning 

Total Freight (Pounds) 
Deplaning 
Enplaning 

Total Air Traffic Operations 
Itinerant^^ 

Commercial Carrier 

Civil 

Armed Forces 
Local (3) 

Armed Forces 
Civil(^) 



2,975,778 2,894,392 

1,446,705 1,430,652 

1,410,863 1,403,020 

118,210 60,720 

43,035,815 35,664,054 

19,738,360 15,606,385 

23,297,455 20,057,669 



(1) 



5,248,867 
2,973,949 
2,274,918 



96,782,400 102,839,092 
55,786,064 59,209,014 
40,996,336 43,630,078 



232,846 


218,404 


216,600 


206,197 


117,679 


108,688 


95,747 


95,182 


3,174 


2,327 


16,246 


12,207 


3,030 


1,942 


13,216 


10,265 



2.8 

1.1 

0.5 

94.7 

20.6 
26.4 
16.2 

N/A 
N/A 
N/A 

-5.9 
-5.8 
-6.0 

6.6 

5.0 

8.3 

0.6 

36.4 

33.1 

56.0 

28.7 



^■^■'Discontinued as of November 1975. Express now delivered by passengers, mail and 
freight. 



'^With origin or destination beyond the local tower. 

(3)Remaining under control of the local tower. 

^^•^ Includes airline personnel familiarization operations. 

Source: Maryland Department of Transportation, State Aviation Administration. 



-234- 



NO. 176 
COMMERCIAL AIRPORTS AND HELIPORTS IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND, 
BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1977 



Allegany 

Cumberland 
Mexico Farms 

Anne Arundel 

Deep Creek 

Baltimore-Washington International 

Lee (Annapolis) 

Suburban 

Baltimore City 

Pier 4, Pratt St. (Heliport) 

Baltimore 

Baltimore Airpark 

Essex 

Glen L. Martin 

Calvert 

Chesapeake Ranch 
Caroline 

Rideely-Pelican 

Carroll 

Clearview 
Westminster 

Cecil 

Cecil County 

Charles 

Aqualand/Clifton 
Maryland 

Dorchester 

Cambridge 
Frederick 

Frederick 
Garrett 

Garrett County 



Aldino-Churchville 

Conowingo 

Fallston 

Forest Hill Industrial 

Kent 

Gill 

Montgomery 

Davis 

Montgomery County 

Prince George's 

College Park 

Freeway 

Hyde Field 

Prince George's Airpark, Inc. 

Queen Anne ' s 

Bay Bridge 
Kentmorr 

St. Mary's 

Park Hill 

St. Mary's County Airport 

Somerset 

Crisfield 
Talbot 

Easton 
Washington 

Hagerstown 

Wicomico 

Bennett 
Salisbury-Wicomico County 

Worcester 

Ocean City 



Source: Maryland Department of Transportation, State Aviation Administration, 
Maryland Airport Directory , 1977. 



MOTOR VEHICLES 

Motor vehicles play a major role in the Maryland economy. In addition to 
traffic volume and highway utilization rates, the manufacture, distribution, 
maintenance, and commercial use of motor vehicles in the State represent a 
major economic force „ Employment in the motor vehicle industry and related 
industries accounts for 17.5 per cent of total employment in the State. 

There were 2,342,844 motor vehicles registered in our State during the 
1977 registration year. Some 2,489,270 persons held licenses to operate 
vehicles as of January 1, 1977. 

There are 25,514 miles of highway in the State, half of which is in the 
metropolitan Baltimore and the metropolitan Washington areas. Interstate 
highways comprise more than 367 miles of these totals. Traffic recorders 
located at 39 points in the State for 1976 reflect the increase in travel 
since the easing of the gasoline crisis in 1974. The total of all toll 
facilities showed an increase of 6.6 per cent from 1975 to 1976; traffic on 
J. F. Kennedy Highway (1-95) in 1976 was 4.7 per cent higher than the total 
for 1975 , while volume on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge rose 26.5 per cent. 

Motor vehicle user taxes, license, fines, and costs amounted to over 
$345,509,000 in fiscal 1976, up $22,745,000 from the fiscal 1975 figure. The 
1976 amount represents 9.8 per cent of the total State receipts for the fiscal 
year. 



-236- 



MOTOR VEHICLE-RELATED EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND AND 
THE UNITED STATES 



U. S. 
MARYLAND 



Per Cent 
of U. S. 



TOTAL 





PETROL- 


AUTO- 


ROAD 


MOTOR 


EUM 


MOTIVE 


CONSTRUC 


VEHICLE 


REFINING 


SALES & 


TION & 


& PARTS 


AND 


SERVIC- 


MAINTEN- 


MFRS. 


WHOLESALING 


ING 


ANCE 


1974 


1974 


1972 


1974 



TRUCK 
DRIVERS 

AND PASSENGER 
OTHER TRANSPOR- 
EMPLOYEES TION* 
1975 1974 



13,901,695^-^^ 773,695^1) 217,278(1) 2,858,425 755,976 9,059,800 296,520^1) 

194,376 (D) 2,109 54,148 9,312 123,000 5,807 

(1) (1) (1) 1.9 1.2 1.4 (1) 



Emplojonent in Motor Vehicle Related Industries as a Per Cent of Total State Employment: 



U. S. 

MARYLAND 



22.0 
17.5 



^Includes some local rail and subway employees. 



^ ''Withheld to avoid disclosure. 

( ^Partial total. 

Source: MVMA Motor Vehicle Facts and Figures '77 . Compiled by the Motor Vehicle 

Manufacturers Association of the U. S., Inc., from U. S. Bureau of the Census 

and American Trucking Associations data. 



NEW MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION AND NUMBER OF LICENSED 
DRIVERS IN MARYLAND: 1976 AND 1975 



1976 



Passenger Cars 
Commercial 



175,487 
34,093 



121,820 
25,489 



Number of Licensed Drivers 
(as of January 1st, 1977, 1976) 2,489,270 



Source: Maryland Department of Transportation, Motor Vehicle Administration, Dealer 
Report, Yearly , issued January 7, 1977, January 9, 1976. 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION IN MARYLAND, BY TYPE AND POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: 1976 AND 1977 







1977(1) 






1976(2) 




POLITICAL 




PLEASURE 






PLEASURE 




SUBDIVISION 


TOTAL 


(CLASS A) 


ALL OTHER* 


TOTAL 


(CLASS A) 


ALL OTHER* 


Maryland 


2,342,844 


1,884,620 


458,224 


2,366,871 


1,887,271 


479,600 


Allegany 


45,409 


35,100 


10 , 309 


47,833 


35,682 


12,151 


Anne Arundel 


213,051 


168,555 


44,496 


211,968 


165,507 


46,461 


Baltimore City 


289,531 


242,12 7 


47,404 


293,494 


244,081 


49,413 


Baltimore 


413,790 


345,790 


68,000 


414,422 


345,920 


68,502 


Calvert 


16,703 


12,369 


4,334 


17,555 


12,030 


5,525 


Caroline 


16,421 


9,284 


7,137 


16,703 


9,320 


7,383 


Carroll 


60,677 


42,558 


18,119 


58,512 


40,608 


17,904 


Cecil 


32,886 


22,994 


9,892 


33,631 


23,283 


10,348 


Charles 


37,846 


27,185 


10,661 


37,579 


26,615 


10,964 


Dorchester 


18,705 


12,847 


5,858 


19,452 


13,008 


6,444 


Frederick 


66,329 


47,596 


18,733 


65,034 


46,576 


18,458 


Garrett 


12,397 


8,769 


3,628 


14,306 


8,920 


5,386 


Harford 


82,108 


64,297 


17,811 


81,984 


63,179 


18,805 


Howard 


70,186 


56,790 


13,396 


67,531 


54,270 


13,261 


Kent 


11,256 


7,573 


3,683 


11,696 


7,682 


4,014 


Montgomery 


371,309 


325,067 


46,242 


374,827 


325,972 


48,855 


Prince George's 


386,384 


317,857 


68,527 


397,816 


324,851 


72,965 


Queen Anne ' s 


14,904 


9,741 


5,163 


14,784 


9,465 


5,319 


St. Mary's 


27,911 


19,335 


8,576 


28,344 


19,490 


8,854 


Somerset 


10,778 


7,350 


3,428 


11,177 


7,462 


3,715 


Talbot 


17,965 


12,423 


5,542 


18,529 


12,588 


5,941 


Washington 


66,880 


48,695 


18,185 


67,949 


49,415 


18,534 


Wicomico 


39,399 


26,949 


12,450 


40,874 


27,562 


13,312 


Worcester 


19,013 


12,596 


6,417 


19,594 


12,728 


6,866 


Miscellaneous 


1,006 


773 


233 


1,277 


1,057 


220 



*Includes Motorcycles, Motorbikes, Motor Scooters (Class D) , Trailers (Class G) , and all 
other Classes. 

(1). 



(2) 



'^For the period February 14, 1977 through June 30, 1977. 
For the period Febrioary 18, 1976 through June 30, 1976. 



Source: Maryland Department of Transportation, Motor Vehicle Administration, Segregation 
of Classifications by Political Subdivision , for years stated. 



-238- 



NO. 180 
AVERAGE DAILY VEHICLE MILES, STATE MAINTAINED ROADS: 1974 AND 1976 



PER CENT CHANGE 
SUBDIVISION 1976 1974 1974/1976 

Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 
Calvert 
Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
Somerset 
St. Mary's 
Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Toll Facilities 

Source: State Highway Administration of Maryland, Bureau of Highway Statistics, 

Mileage, Annual Vehicle Miles of Travel and Square Yards of Surfacing , as of 
January 1, 1977 and January 1, 1975. 



49,373,671 


43,468,213 


13.6 


1,067,410 


1,145,115 


-6.8 


4,570,620 


4,279,321 


6.8 


7,951,431 


6,960,184 


14.2 


391,748 


343,848 


13.9 


369,372 


317,721 


16.3 


1,126,214 


868,803 


29.6 


855,054 


779,033 


9.8 


1,097,504 


845,539 


29.8 


434,130 


399,169 


8.8 


2,177,979 


1,980,554 


10.0 


614,605 


475,481 


29.3 


1,543,972 


1,347,921 


14.5 


2,185,363 


1,979,749 


10.4 


365,768 


278,556 


31.3 


7,085,685 


6,213,546 


14.0 


8,112,073 


7,551,658 


7.4 


835,454 


690,889 


20.9 


409,800 


370,803 


10.5 


607,876 


553,843 


9.8 


722,203 


584,897 


23.5 


1,900,360 


1,681,808 


13.0 


880,700 


771,168 


14.2 


710,809 


661,684 


7.4 


3,357,541 


2,386,924 


40.7 



W > Q 

C3 M M 
O* Pi Pi 



3- 00 


00 


CnT 


vO 


a> 


in 


en 


o" 


C3^ 


r^ 


H 00 


a\ 


r^ 


CM 


r^ 




00 








3- ro 


'~l 


"^^ 


c^ 


00 


■^^ 


vD 


00 


0^ 


0^ 



D rH 


CsT 


in 


pj^ 


<r 


so 


CsT 


p^ 


m 


CN 




O 


r-- 


v£) 


0^ 


O 


in 


ON 


c^ 


<r 


vO 


-3- 










CTn 


00 


00 


0^ 



n CO 


a^ 


en 


ro 


CN 


^"^ 


ON 


vO 


o 


in 






00 








.-H 


<r 


•<r 




^ o 


<r 




"^^ 


■^^ 


0^ 


<r 


ON 




fO 



n vr 


oT 


00 


o" 


^" 


in 


-cj- 


rC 


CM 


CJN 






.-1 






o 






00 


>X) 


-\ vD 


o 


M 


r^ 


00 


so 


■^^^ 


00 




in 



H <r 


in 


CN 


^ 


>H 


.-H 


vO 


CM 


CN 


.H 


rH 


O 


in 


r^ 


-cr 


O 


r^ 


^ 


(N 


a^ 






o 


<y\ 


o 






C3^ 




o 


D r^ 


O 




00 


o 


'^„ 


C7N 


CTN 


CO 


00 



NO. 182 
HIGHWAY MILEAGES BETWEEN SELECTED LOCATIONS IN MARYLAND 



Annapolis 




26 


53 


44 


117 


170 


77 


78 


103 


220 


114 


91 


85 


59 


33 


Baltimore 


26 




72 


63 


136 


140 


51 


47 


72 


189 


133 


122 


104 


85 


38 


Cambridge 


53 


72 




51 


64 


223 


87 


131 


156 


273 


61 


149 


32 


112 


86 


Chestertown 


44 


63 


51 




115 


214 


36 


122 


147 


264 


112 


140 


83 


103 


77 


Crisfield 


117 


136 


64 


115 




287 


139 


195 


220 


337 


60 


213 


32 


176 


150 


Cumberland 


170 


140 


223 


214 


287 




191 


93 


68 


49 


284 


217 


255 


205 


138 


Elkton 


77 


51 


87 


36 


139 


191 




98 


123 


:40 


136 


173 


107 


136 


89 


Frederick 


78 


47 


131 


122 


195 


93 


98 




25 


142 


192 


124 


163 


112 


45 


Hagerstown 


103 


72 


156 


147 


220 


68 


123 


25 




117 


217 


149 


188 


137 


70 


Oakland 


220 


189 


273 


264 


337 


49 


240 


142 


117 




334 


266 


305 


254 


187 


Ocean City 


114 


133 


61 


112 


60 


284 


136 


192 


217 


334 




210 


29 


173 


147 


Point Lookout 


91 


122 


149 


140 


213 


217 


173 


124 


149 


266 


210 




181 


81 


79 


Salisbury 


85 


104 


32 


83 


32 


255 


107 


163 


188 


305 


29 


181 




140 


118 


Solomon's 


59 


85 


112 


103 


176 


205 


136 


112 


137 


254 


173 


81 


140 




67 


Washington, D. 


C. 33 


38 


86 


77 


150 


138 


89 


45 


70 


187 


147 


79 


118 


67 




Source: State 


Highway 


Administration, 


Official 


State 


Highway Map 















OrooOO tHCO^J-ooo <t en r-{ \ 



00 00 tH rH v£> 



O ro O ^ O 



r>- 00 ON m -cT 

CM 00 LTi iH CO 

o v£) t^ in eg 



vo cN -^ -<r m 



vO 00 00 o c^ 

00 CO C^ iH 



r-^ 00 CN CO CO 

00 CO iH ON iH 
rH CO CO iH 



incNienoooo a\ en a\ o <f cooa^^ 

LOCNICsJCOCO -_ — _- -^_, 



inr^ooooo <rt^r^(Tioo oocNj<fco<f 
r-i m (y\ <)■ LTi Lna^lncMLn ojcmcooocsi 
ONvoooinco ^DOr--\Dr^ uoctniHvd-^ 



JOCNlcoo^ c^jcooor-^ 
-.Hu~lOv3- rHOOOuO 



ON v£) cTi in f 






^co,Hcsl^^ vOiHcovo 

><fr^CMlO rHCTiCNvO 

HO^vD<t iDiHCTir-- 



c; w o o -u 
CO <: e e >-i 



iH MM 

O rH rH XI 






(1) w v-i S C 



^^^ 



S PM O" en C/D 



AGRICULTURE ^^ 

Maryland, like most other states of the United States, and especially the 
"megalopolitan" states, has been undergoing a shift from rural agricultural 
living and employment to urban manufacturing and service employment. 

Accordingly, the land devoted to farming and the number of farms has 
been steadily declining. In the period from 1968 to 1977, the land in farms 
has declined from 3,200,000 acres to 2,925,000 acres while the number of farms 
in the State has declined from 19,700 to 17,500. A natural corollary here has 
been the decline in farm workers to an annual average of 31,000 in 1972, 
including family and hired workers. This trend however, has been reversed in 
recent years. In 1976 the number of farm workers reached an annual average of 
34,000. 

The largest sources of farm income are livestock and livestock products, 
which, in 1975, accounted for 60.7 per cent of all agricultural receipts in 
Maryland. The dominance of this category is due primarily to dairy products 
and poultry. Cattle and calves, eggs, and hogs are important, but they 
represent substantially smaller elements. In the same year field crops 
accoimted for approximately 30 per cent of the receipts for all commodities, 
led by com, soy beans, and tobacco. At the same time vegetables and melons, 
as well as greenhouse and nursery products were important sources of farm in- 
come in the State. 

Prices received by farmers have improved quite substantially in the period 
from 1969 to 1976. Using a base period of 1947 - 1956 to equal 100, the index 
number for all commodities rose from 103 in 1969 to 168.0 in 1976. Likewise 
the all crops index rose over the same time period from 109.0 to 198.0 while 
an index based on livestock and livestock products went from 100.0 to 153.0. 



-243- 



NO. 184 
CASH RECEIPTS FROM FARMING, MARYLAND: 1973, 1974 AND 1975 





1975 


1974 


1973 


PER CENT 


OF TOTAL 


RECEIPTS 


COMMODITY 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


1975 


1974 


1973 


ALL CROPS 


260,853 


258,428 


194,197 


39.1 


41.0 


33.4 


Corn 


94,879 


88,853 


59,980 


14.2 


14.1 


10.3 


Soybeans 


47,829 


56,760 


43,632 


7.2 


9.0 


7.5 


Tobacco 


28,880 


28,556 


20,076 


4.3 


4.5 


3.5 


Wheat 


14,611 


17,602 


8,553 


2.2 


2.8 


1.5 


Tomatoes 


6,408 


5,443 


4,131 


1.0 


0.9 


0.7 


Apples 


5,837 


5,465 


6,075 


0.9 


0.9 


1.0 


Cucumbers 


4,613 


3,297 


2,826 


0.7 


0.5 


0.5 


Sweet Com 


4,537 


2,829 


1,912 


0.7 


0.4 


0.3 


Commercial Sod 


4,159 


4,320 


N/A 


0.6 


0.7 


N/A 


Snap Beans 


3,868 


3,357 


2,789 


0.6 


0.5 


0.5 


Hay 


3,695 


2,980 


2,448 


0.6 


0.5 


0.4 


Barley 


3,574 


3,819 


2,715 


0.5 


0.6 


0.5 


Peaches 


2,850 


2,170 


1,796 


0.4 


0.3 


0.3 


Sweet Potatoes 


2,550 


1,518 


1.954 


0.4 


0.2 


0.3 


Green Peas 


1,766 


1,453 


974 


0.3 


0.2 


0.2 


Potatoes 


1,723 


1,428 


2,197 


0.3 


0.2 


0.4 


Watermelons 


1,555 


1,790 


1,322 


0.2 


0.3 


0.2 


Mushrooms 


1,066 


922 


1,041 


0.2 


0.1 


0.2 


Asparagus 


891 


1,455 


1,205 


0.1 


0.2 


0.2 


Lima Beans 


794 


634 


573 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


Strawberries 


662 


477 


508 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


Cantaloups 


533 


459 


455 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


Spinach 


470 


336 


401 


0.1 


0.1 


0.1 


Other Vegetables (1) 


3,982 


3,599 


3,531 


0.6 


0.6 


0.6 


Other Field Crops (2) 


1,439 


1,414 


1,211 


0.2 


0.2 


0.2 


Other Fruits ^-^^ 


316 


375 


355 


A 


0.1 


0.1 


Total Field Crops (^) 


200,246 


203,852 


143,807 


30.0 


32.4 


24.8 


Total Vegetables 
and Melons ^^) 


29,417 


24,652 


20.110 


4.4 


3.9 


3.5 














Total Fruit (6) 


9,665 


8,487 


8,734 


1.4 


1.3 


1.5 


Forest Products (7) 


5,525 


5,363 


5,472 


0.8 


0.9 


0.9 


Greenhouse and Nursery 


11,841 


11,754 


16,074 


1.8 


1.9 


2.8 


LIVESTOCK AND LIVE- 


405,490 


369,857 


380,601 


60.7 


58.8 


65.6 


STOCK PRODUCTS 














Broilers 


183,854 


165,217 


179,848 


27.5 


26.3 


31.0 


Dairy Products 


144,998 


133,621 


113,927 


21.7 


21.2 


19.6 



(continued on following page) 



NO. 184 
CASH RECEIPTS FROM FARMING, MARYLAND: 1973, 1974 AND 1975 (Cont'd.) 





1975 


1974 


1973 


PER CENT 


OF TOTAL 


RECEIPTS 


COMMODITY 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


1975 


1974 


1973 


Cattle and Calves 


29,219 


26,265 


43,915 


4.4 


4.7 


7.6 


Hogs 


24,126 


18,877 


20,271 


3.6 


3.0 


3.5 


Eggs 


18,674 


18,682 


18,139 


2.8 


3.0 


3.1 


Farm Chickens 


693 


628 


1,136 


0.1 


0.1 


0.2 


Sheep and Lambs 


325 


292 


303 


* 


* 


0.1 


Turkeys 


302 


196 


279 


* 


* 


A 


Honey 


175 


186 


250 


* 


* 


* 


Wool 


43 


54 


84 


* 


* 


* 


Other(8) 


3,081 


2,839 


2,450 


0.5 


0.5 


0.4 


All Commodities 


666,343 


628,285 


574,798 


99.8 


99.8 


99.0 


Government Payments 


1,204 


1,023 


5,763 


0.2 


0.2 


1.0 


Total Receipts 


667,547 


629,308 


580,561 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



N/A = Not Available. 

*Less than 0.05. 

^-'-^Beets, broccoli, cabbage, kale, peppers and others. 



(2) 



Rye, oats, lespedeza seed, red clover and miscellaneous crops. 



^-'-'Miscellaneous fruits, berries and nuts. 

^ '^Includes potatoes, sweet potatoes and mushrooms. 

Excludes potatoes and sweet potatoes. 

Includes strawberries. 
'^Includes maple sugar and syrup. 

^^Miscellaneous livestock and poultry, and livestock and poultry products, beeswax 
and horses and mules. 

Source: Maryland Department of Agriculture, Maryland Agricultural Statistics , June 
1977. 



-245- 



NO. 185 

SELECTED COMMODITIES INDICES, PRICES RECEIVED BY FARMERS, MARYLAND: 
1969-1976(1) (1947-1956 = 100) 



ALL COMMODITIES 



LIVESTOCK AND 
LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS 



1976 
1975 
1974 
1973 
1972 
1971 
1970 
1969 



168 
162 
157 
149 
115 
106 
105 
103 



198 
193 
194 
167 
128 
118 
113 
109 



153 
147 
140 
140 
109 
100 
101 
100 



(1) 



Annual Average based on unrounded monthly indices. 



Source: Maryland Department of Agriculture, Division of Marketing, I4aryland Agricultural 
Statistics , June 1977. 

NO. 186 
NUMBER OF FARMS AND LAND IN FARMS, MARYLAND: 1968-1977 ^^^ 



NUMBER OF FARMS 



LAND IN FARMS (1,000 ACRES) 



1977 
1976 
1975 
1974 
1973 
1972 
1971 
1970 
1969 
1968 



17,500 
17,600 
17,600 
17,800 
18,000 
18,200 
18,500 
18,800 
19,200 
19,700 



2,925 
2,905 
2,940 
2,955 
2,970 
3,010 
3,050 
3,080 
3,130 
3,200 



(-'-^Of ficial estimate of Maryland-Delaware Crop Reporting Service. 

Source: Maryland Department of Agriculture, Division of Marketing, Maryland Agricultural I 
Statistics , Publication No. 51, June 1977. 



NO. 187 
WORKERS ON FARMS IN MARYLAND: 



1972-1974 AND 1976 



(1) 



Family Workers 
Hired Workers 
Total 



21,000 
13,000 



24,000 
10,000 
34,000 



24,000 
8,000 
32,000 



24,000 
7,000 



(-'■Wnual Average of Persons employed during the last full calendar week ending at least 

one day before the end of the month. 
Source: Maryland Department of Agriculture, Maryland Agricultur al Statistics, 
Publication No. 51, June 1977. 

-246- 



-248- 



H O 
O " 



Pi < ^ 



hJ w o 

< ^ <=l 

O !^ rH 

H > </> 



-249- 



HOUSING AND CONSTRUCTION 

Traditionally, home ownership has been a goal for most Marylanders. 
Virtually 59 per cent of the housing units in the State were owner occupied 
at the time of taking the most recent Census of Housing. The variations in 
percentages of owner occupancy ranged from 71.8 per cent in Howard County to 
42.2 per cent in Baltimore City. 

Overall, the quality of housing is rather good when one looks at the 
generally cited characteristics. Again, there is considerable variance among 
the political subdivisions. 

The total construction contract values ratio of Maryland to the Nation 
stood at 2.0 in 1976. Speaking in absolute dollars, slightly over $2.0 billion 
of construction contract awards were made in the State during that year, an 
increase of nearly 7.5 per cent over 1975. More than $828.5 million of the 
value was for residential construction contracts while $777 million represented 
awards for non-residential buildings. Non-building construction accounted for 
the remaining $421 million. 

There were 26,309 new building permits issued in Maryland for residential 
dwelling units of all t3T)es, an increase of nearly 34 per cent over 1975 
during which period this sector of construction was the hardest hit by the 
recent national recession. 

Although Maryland is not a major mobile home market, there is a small but 
steady demand for this type of housing. From 1960 through 1976, 33,095 new 
mobile homes were shipped into the State. 



SELECTED CHARACTERISTICS OF HOUSING IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: 1970 





QUALITY OF 


DENSITY OF 


HOME 


RECENTLY 




HOUSING 


OCCUPANCY 


OWNERSHIP 


BUILT ' 




1970 


1970 


1970 


HOUSING 




PERCENTAGE 


PERCENTAGE 








LACKING 


WITH MORE 




PERCENTAGE 




SOME OR ALL 


THAN 1.00 


PERCENTAGE 


BUILT 




PLUMBING 


PERSONS 


OWNER 


1960- 


SUBDIVISION 


FACILITIES 


PER ROOM 


OCCUPIED 


1970 


Allegany 


8.2 


4.5 


63.7 


15.6 


Anne Arundel 


4.2 


6.7 


66.5 


38.0 


Baltimore City 


1.8 


8.3 


42.2 


10.2 


Baltimore 


2.1 


4.5 


68.2 


30.2 


Calvert 


22.0 


12.5 


60.5 


33.0 


Caroline 


19.5 


6.3 


63.8 


17.5 


Carroll 


8.6 


5.7 


68.3 


28.0 


Cecil 


10.0 


8.8 


62.7 


21.0 


Charles 


16.7 


12.8 


65.9 


41.2 


Dorchester 


20.4 


6.5 


57.6 


17.1 


Frederick 


11.8 


6.1 


62.4 


22.9 


Garrett 


21.7 


8.6 


62.3 


25.4 


Harford 


5.7 


7.2 


62.9 


40.0 


Howard 


6.7 


5.2 


71.8 


53.7 


Kent 


20.4 


5.6 


59.5 


22.5 


Montgomery 


1.1 


3.2 


59.7 


43.7 


Prince George's 


1.7 


6.1 


48.2 


52.6 


Queen Anne's 


22.5 


6.9 


62.5 


24.4 


St. Mary's 


11.8 


11.9 


51.0 


33.0 


Somerset 


34.2 


8.3 


65.5 


16.1 


Talbot 


13.6 


5.6 


59.0 


18.8 


Washington 


11.0 


5.6 


58.6 


20.5 


Wicomico 


11.8 


6.0 


63.8 


24.3 


Worcester 


22.1 


8.0 


58.4 


17.5 



Note: All data concern year round homes. 

Sources: U. S. Census of Population and Housing, Final Report , HC1-A22, Table 29. 
U. S. Census of Population and Housing, Final Report , HC1-B22, Table 62. 



-251- 



VALUE OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT (D AWARDS, UNITED STATES 
AND MARYLAND: 1974-1976 AND 1967 



JURISDICTION 



1976 1975 1974 1967 

($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) 



(2) 



United States 
Maryland 



Maryland As Per Cent of 
United States 



102,564 


90,237 


2,027 


1,886 


2.0 


2.1 



94,370 53,446 

2,014 1,150 

2.1 2.2 



^-'■^ Rep resents the sum of the value of residential building contracts, non-residential 
building contracts, and non-building construction contracts. 

^ ■'Excludes Alaska and Hawaii. 

Source: McGraw Hill Information Systems Company, Dodge Construction Potentials , 
Region II Bulletin , various December issues. (Maryland data). 
U. S. Department of Commerce, U. S. Survey of Current Business , April issue, 
1977, 1976, 1969. (United States data). 



NEW BUILDING PERMITS FOR PRIVATE AND PUBLIC RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNITS 
AUTHORIZED IN MARYLAND: 1967-1976 



PRIVATE AND PUBLIC RESIDENTIAL 
DWELLING UNITS 



PER CENT CHANGE 
OVER PREVIOUS YEAR 



1976 
1975 
19 74 
1973 
1972 
1971 
1970 
1969 
1968 
1967 



26,309 
19,661 
23,299 
48,307 
54,566 
44,659 
35,138 
33,489 
32,528 
31,789 



33.8 

-15.6 

-51.8 

-11.5 

22.2 

27.1 

4.9 

3.0 

2.3 



Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Construction Review , April/May 1977, May 1976, 
May 1972. 



-252- 



ANNUAL VALUE OF NON-RESIDENTIAL AND RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS 
AWARDED IN MARYLAND: 1967-1976 





YEAR 


TOTAL NON- 
RESIDENTIAL & 
RESIDENTIAL 
VALUATION 


PER CENT 
CHANGE OVER NON-RESI- 
PREVIOUS DENTIAL 
YEAR VALUATION 


PER CENT 

CHANGE OVER 

PREVIOUS 

YEAR 


RESIDENTIAL 
VALUATION 


PER CENT 

CHANGE OVER 

PREVIOUS 

YEAR 


1976 


$1,605,840,000 


28 


$777,177,000 


14 


$ 828,663,000 


45 


1975 


1,252,273,000 


-1 


680,986,000 


3 


571,287,000 


-5 


1974 


1,263,974,000 


-24 


662,441,000 


1 


601,533,000 


-40 


1973 


1,656,250,000 


14 


655,362,000 


20 


1,000,888,000 


11 


1972 


1,446,568,000 


19 


546,685,000 


12 


899,883,000 


23 


1971 


1,218,795,000 


20 


486,364,000 


-14 


732,431,000 


63 


1970 


1,016,238,000 


-6 


567,895,000 


3 


448,343,000 


-15 


1969 


1,078,421,000 


23 


553,977,000 


31 


524,444,000 


15 


1968 


878,845,000 


3 


421,966,000 


3 


456,879,000 


2 


1967 


855,268,000 


- 


409,513,000 


- 


445,755,000 


- 


Source 


: McGraw Hill Information 
II Bulletin, December is 


Systems Company, 
sues, 1968-1976. 


Dodge Construction Potentials 


, Region 



NO. 194 
MOBILE HOME SHIPMENTS INTO MARYLAND: 1960-1976 



YEAR NUMBER INDEX (1967=100) CUMULATIVE 

1976 1,545 73.6 33,095 

1975 1,502 71.5 31,550 

1974 2,282 108.7 30,048 

1973 3,014 143.5 27,766 

1972 2,788 132.8 24,752 

1971 2,425 115.5 21,964 

1970 2,979 141.9 19,539 

1969 1,900 90.5 16,560 

1968 2,280 108.6 14,660 

1967 2,100 100.0 12,380 

1966 2,090 99.5 10,280 

1965 1,810 86.2 8,190 

1964 2,000 95.2 6,380 

1963 1,350 64.3 4,380 

1962 1,170 55.7 3,030 

1961 820 39.0 1,860 

1960 1,040 49.5 



Source: Mobile Home Manufacturers Association. 



-254- 



REAL ESTATE 

The total assessed value of real property in Maryland in 1978 stood at 
$25,395,967,000, representing an increase of 19.4 per cent over the corres- 
ponding aggregate assessment in 1976. The greatest valuation occurs in 
Montgomery, Prince George's and Baltimore Counties, and in Baltimore City, 
in that descending rank. 

Strides have been made along the local jurisdictions to achieve uniformity 
in assessment level ratios, and all assessors in the State are employees of 
the Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation. The Statewide average in 
1975 was 43.8 per cent, a ratio apparently lower than those shown in earlier 
years. But, this reduction in level is due to the change in the inflation 
factor used in the determination of assessments. 

The federal government owns and leases substantial acreage and buildings 
in the State. The size of the federal operation is due, at least in part, to 
the proximity of Maryland to the District of Columbia. 

As of September 30, 1976 the federal government owned more than 205,000 
acres of land and nearly 12,000 buildings on Maryland land. And, as of September 
30, 1976, just over 3,800 acres and more than 1,050 buildings were leased 
to the federal establishment. Increases in both ownership and leasehold 
interests have occurred substantially in recent years. 



-255- 



NUMBER OF REAL PROPERTIES AND REAL PROPERTY ASSESSED 
VALUES, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: FY 1978 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



NUMBEI 


I OF 


PROPERTIES 


1,344 


031 


35 


545 


118 


369 


234 


524 


187 


143 


20 


969 


10 


685 


30 


781 


23 


972 


22 


826 


16 


583 


40 


082 


16 


333 


45 


031 


39 


566 


10 


36 7 


155 


827 


171 


111 


15 


729 


20 


981 


12 


,887 


11 


,744 


37 


,067 


32 


,496 


33 


,413 



ASSESSED VALUE 
REAL PROPERTY ($1,000) 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



25,395,967 

276,964 
2,120,208 
2,510,366 
4,049,426 

228,556 

78,541 
542,038 
267,879 
406,236 
125,156 

654,942 
123,131 
777,263 
1,037,484 
103,723 

5,671,440 

4,376,199 

166,348 

276,209 

76,651 

248,864 
499,578 
339,655 
439,110 



Totals may not add due to rounding. 

Source: State of Maryland, State Department of Assessments and Taxation. 



-256- 



NO. 196 



REAL PROPERTY ASSESSMENT LEVEL RATIOS, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: 1969, 1973, 1974, 1975 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



1975 



(1) 



1974 



(1) 



1973 



1969 



Maryland Average 



44.6 



51.8 



Allegany 


44.8 


Anne Arundel 


42.3 


Baltimore City 


41.0 


Baltimore 


44.5 


Calvert 


42.4 


Caroline 


43.0 


Carroll 


44.0 


Cecil 


43.0 


Charles 


41.8 


Dorchester 


42.9 


Frederick 


45.0 


Garrett 


41.9 


Harford 


44.7 


Howard 


44.5 


Kent 


41.7 


Montgomery 


45.0 


Prince George's 


44.3 


Queen Anne's 


40.8 


St. Mary's 


45.0 


Somerset 


45.3 


Talbot 


43.0 


Washington 


43.4 


Wicomico 


44.7 


Worcester 


42.0 



43.6 


52.4 


43.8 


51.3 


42.8 


55.0 


46.2 


52.7 


44.2 


52.6 


41.9 


50.7 


43.2 


52.5 


43.8 


51.2 


42.1 


51.3 


42.7 


50.4 


44.2 


53.6 


39.2 


46.7 


45.1 


52.1 


45.0 


53.1 


41.3 


49.2 


44.5 


53.7 


45.2 


54.2 


41.3 


50.0 


43.9 


51.9 


44.0 


52.8 


43.3 


51.0 


45.0 


53.5 


44.8 


53.0 


42.7 


51.5 



54.0 
47.3 
53.3 
48.8 
47.5 

47.5 
48.7 
48.4 
48.8 
48.4 

50.8 
40.5 
50.9 
52.2 
47.2 

50.4 
50.8 
48.2 
43.9 
49.3 

47.9 
51.4 
50.8 
47.9 



(1) 



Ratios adjusted to reflect a change in State policy of a basic 60 per cent level 
used for other years. 



Source: State of Maryland, State Department of Assessments and Taxation, Thirty- 
Second Biennial Report , and appropriate prior reports. 



-257- 



REAL PROPERTY LEASED ^^^ TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IN MARYLAND: 
1974 AND 1976 



Real Property Leased 
No. of leases 
Land (Acres) 
No. of locations 
Floor Area (Square Feet) 
Annual Rental 



1,031 

3,804.6 

1,058 

11,681,453 

$43,658,460 



1,147 

4,006.5 

1,055 

10,567,471 

$36,028,806 



NO. 198 
FEDERALLY OWNED REAL PROPERTY^-"-^ IN MARYLAND: 1974 AND 1976 



Federally Owned Real Property 
Total Cost ($1,000) 
No. of installations 
Land (Acres) 
No. of buildings 



$2,394,205 

348 

205,478 

11,914 



$2,145,458 

322 

191,222 

11,947 



(1) 



As of June 30 of stated years. 



General Services Administration, Inventory Report of Real Property Leased 
to the United States throughout the World , June 30, 1974 and Sept. 30, 1976. 
Inventory Report on Real Property Owned by the United States throughout 
the World , June 30, 1974 and Sept. 30, 1976. 



FEDERAL OUTLAYS IN MARYLAND 

While Maryland ranks forty-second among the states in area and eighteenth 
in population, it ranks fourteenth in total federal funds received. 

Of the nearly $8.5 billion in 1976 outlays in Maryland, more than $2.1 
billion were in Montgomery County, $1.8 billion in Baltimore City, while 
Prince George's County received over $1.2 billion and Baltimore County, a 
little over one billion. 

From the myriad of federal programs, outlays in the retirement and dis- 
ability programs were over $1.5 billion, defense outlays were over $2.4 
billion and it is thus seen that these many federal programs constitute a 
major impact on the Maryland economy. 



-259- 



NO. 199 
RELATIVE POSITION OF THE STATE: FY 1976 AND 1974 



14 th 
18 th 
26th 
42nd 



in Total Federal Funds 

in Population 

in Number of Low Income Individuals (1969) 

in Area 



Rank in Terms of Funds Received from the Federal Agencies 



Department of Commerce 

National Aeronautics and Space Administration 

Department of State 

General Services Administration 

Department of Defense 

Department of Health, Education and Welfare 

Energy Research and Development Administration 

Department of Housing and Urban Development 

Environmental Protection Agency 

Treasury Department 

Veterans Administration 

Department of Justice 

Department of Labor 

Department of Transportation 

Department of the Interior 

Department of Agriculture 



1st 


for the 


3rd 


for the 


6 th 


for the 


8 th 


for the 


10 th 


for the 


11th 


for the 


12th 


for the 


14 th 


for the 


16 th 


for the 


22nd 


for the 


23rd 


for the 


23rd 


for the 


23rd 


for the 


25th 


for the 


25 th 


for the 


25th 


for the 



14 th 
17 th 
26th 
42nd 



2nd 
3rd 
6th 
5th 
11th 
11th 

20th 
8th 
24 th 
17th 
19th 
22nd 
15 th 
28 th 
31st 



Source: Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service, 
in Maryland , December 1976 and December 1974. 



Federal Outlays 



FUNCTIONAL SUMMARY OF FEDERAL OUTLAYS, MARYLAND: 
(In Thousands of Dollars) 



Total 



$8,471,353 



Department of Defense - Military 

Retirement and Disability Insurance 

Health Care Services 

Federal Employee Retirement and Disability 

Health Research and Education 

Health 

General Science, Space and Technology 

Public Assistance and Other Income Supplements 

Payment to the Postal Service 

Interest on the Public Debt 

Income Security for Veterans 

Other Advancement and Regulation of Commerce 

Energy 

General Property and Records Management 

General Revenue Sharing 

Other Natural Resources 

Water Transportation 

Veterans Education, Training, and Rehabilitation 

Pollution Control and Abatement 

Manpower Training 

Ground Transportation 

Agricultural Research and Services 

Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education 

Community Development 

Social Services 

Hospital and Medical Care for Veterans 

Higher Education 

Unemployment Insurance 

Area and Regional Development 

Recreational Resources 

Central Fiscal Operations 

Research and General Education Aids 

General Science and Basic Research 

Federal Law Enforcement and Prosecution 

Prevention and Control of Health Problems 

Law Enforcement Assistance 

Conservation and Land Management 

Interest Other than on Public Debt 



2,474,668 

1,501,159 

551,659 

447,445 

337,223 

316,166 

290,933 

254,244 

216,649 

156,520 

145,062 

142,621 

138,005 

126,894 

124,662 

123,573 

117,025 

110,154 

98,356 

94,171 

84,001 

76,828 

76,644 

63,859 

56,497 

49,755 

38,270 

29,831 

24,581 

22,435 

22,371 

17,928 

17,107 

16,888 

16,636 

13,744 

11,914 

8,981 



(continued on following page) 



-261- 



FUNCTIONAL SUMMARY OF FEDERAL OUTLAYS, MARYLAND: FY 1976 (Cont'd.) 
(In Thousands of Dollars) 



Health Planning and Construction $7,347 

Conduct of Foreign Affairs 6,812 

Air Transportation 6,253 

Foreign Information and Exchange Activities 5,573 

Farm Income Stabilization 4,771 

Other Veterans Benefits and Services 3,751 

Water Resources and Power 3,580 

Natural Resources, Environment, and Energy 3,374 

Disaster Relief and Insurance 3,229 

Foreign Economic and Financial Assistance 2,611 

Earth Sciences 2,178 

Other Manpower Services 2,022 

Atomic Energy Defense Activities 872 

Education, Manpower, and Social Services 756 

Other Transportation 656 

Central Personnel Management 581 

Federal Correctional and Rehab. Activities 534 

Defense-Related Activities 374 

Mortgage Credit and Thrift Insurance 317 

Other General Government 299 

Veterans Housing 4 

Other General Purpose Fiscal Assistance 2 

Source: Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service, Federal 
Outlays in Maryland, December 1976 . 



I 



-262- 



NO. 201 

FEDERAL OUTLAYS IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 
(in Thousands of Dollars) 



1976 



Maryland Total $8,471,353 

Montgomery 2,130,454 

Baltimore City 1,802,110 

Prince George's 1,227,699 

Baltimore 1,003,429 

Anne Arundel 784,038 

Harford 286,295 

St. Mary's 149,250 

Washington 143,655 

Howard 143,023 

Frederick 124,692 

Allegany 109,399 

Charles 97,212 

Cecil 85,930 

Carroll 69,697 

Wicomico 65,708 

Dorchester 38,069 

Talbot 34,614 

Garrett 33,765 

Worcester 27,331 

Somerset 26,283 

Caroline 24,323 

Calvert 24,229 

Queen Anne's 21,725 

Kent 18,424 

Figures may not add to total due to rounding. 

Source: Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service, Federal Outlays 
in Maryland , December 1976. 



-263- 



NO. 202 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION SUMMARY OF 



ALLEGANY ANNE ARUNDEL BALTIMORE CITY 



Political Subdivision Total 

Department of Agriculture 
Department of Commerce 
Department of Defense 
Department of Health, Education 

and Welfare 
Department of Housing and Urban 

Development 
Department of the Interior 
Department of Justice 
Department of Labor 
Department of State 
Department of Transportation 
Treasury Department 
ACTION 
Agency for International 

Development 
American Battle Moniaments 

Commission 
Civil Service Commission 
Community Services Administration 
Energy Research and Development Adm. 
Environmental Protection Agency 
Equal Employment Opportunity 

Commission 
Farm Credit Administration 
Federal Communications Commission 
Federal Energy Administration 
Federal Home Loan Bank Board 
Federal Mediation and Conciliation 

Service 
General Services Administration 
Interstate Commerce Commission 
National Aeronautics and Space 

Administration 
National Foundation on Arts 

and Humanities 
National Labor Relations Board 
National Science Foundation 
Office of Economic Opportunity 
Postal Service 
Railroad Retirement Board 
Selective Service System 
Small Business Administration 
Tennessee Valley Authority 
U. S. Information Agency 
U. S. Sinai Support Mission 
Veterans Administration 
Water Resources Council 



$109,399 

7,751 

388 

4,432 

59,829 

2,217 



$784,038 

10,070 

2,850 

457,035 

132,051 

1,334 



$1,802,110 

67,102 

17,829 

388,139 

697,380 

33,537 



62 


1,483 


2,074 


1 


27 


3,974 


967 


3,070 


56,650 


- 


136 


2,099 


,038 


15,458 


44,095 


,544 


60,084 


99,089 


- 


123 


752 


- 


6 


583 



10 



9,225 


39,220 


102,058 


192 


193 


4,979 


- 


325 


2,430 


33 


7,664 


37,273 


- 


- 


1,252 


- 


- 


109 


- 


70 


597 


- 


- 


163 


- 


- 


120 


77 


10,715 


16,839 


- 


- 


83 


49 


6,090 


2,690 


4 


89 


2,350 



_ 


_ 


1,139 


- 


18 


5,164 


4,384 


11,720 


99,194 


7,402 


2,862 


31,307 


_ 


_ 


243 


27 


357 


2,969 


_ 


354 


1,087 


_ 


34 


2,216 


_ 


- 


9 


5,776 


20,500 


74,526 


- 


100 


- 



**Less than $500. 



-264- 



FEDERAL OUTLAYS BY AGENCY: FY 1976 
(IN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS) 



BALTIMORE 


CALVERT 


CAROLINE 


CARROLL 


CECIL 


$1,003,429 


$24,229 


$24,323 


$69,697 


$85,930 


5,429 


1,351 


1,684 


1,513 


1,994 


78,862 


- 


** 


1,528 


9 


90,325 


1,029 


295 


1,579 


14,029 


578,049 


14,081 


16,040 


37,177 


24,558 


563 




3 




185 


12,393 


- 


- 


- 


8 


19,378 


167 


260 


1,663 


743 


145 


- 


1 


** 


2 


10,966 


1,687 


84 


3,639 


1,058 


35,840 


1,387 


1,164 


3,690 


3,311 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


** 


129 


- 


- 


420 


- 



69,408 

132 

1,326 

375 



2,196 



2,196 



7,907 

22 
56 



6,150 



21,776 

12,413 

19 



,986 


43 


58 


2,459 


15 


_ 



13 



6,749 


1,036 


1 


,277 


3 


,193 


2,365 


1,723 


232 




159 


1 


,038 


1,251 


53 


- 




- 




- 


- 


1,892 


5 




50 




174 


16 


13 


** 




- 




** 


- 


41 


- 




2 




4 


- 


5,422 


997 


1 


,096 


4 


033 


25,848 



(continued on following page) 



NO. 202 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION SUMMARY OF 



DORCHESTER 



Political Subdivision Total 

Department of Agriculture 
Department of Commerce 
Department of Defense 
Department of Health, Education 

and Welfare 
Department of Housing and Urban 

Development 
Development of the Interior 
Department of Justice 
Department of Labor 
Department of State 
Department of Transportation 
Treasury Department 
ACTION 
Agency for International 

Development 
American Battle Monuments 

Commission 
Civil Service Commission 
Community Services Administration 
Energy Research and Development Adm. 
Environmental Protection Agency 
Equal Employment Opportunity 

Commission 
Farm Credit Administration 
Federal Communications Commission 
Federal Energy Administration 
Federal Home Loan Bank Board 
Federal Mediation and Conciliation 

Service 
General Services Administration 
Interstate Commerce Commission 
National Aeronautics and Space 

Administration 
National Foimdation on Arts 

and Humanities 
National Labor Relations Board 
National Science Foundation 
Office of Economic Opportunity 
Postal Service 
Railroad Retirement Board 
Selective Service System 
Small Business Administration 
Tennessee Valley Authority 
U. S. Information Agency 
U. S. Sinai Support Mission 
Veterans Administration 
Water Resources Council 



97,212 


$38,069 


2,401 


1,269 


2 


** 


54,479 


3,427 


23,957 


22,197 



6,150 
148 



3,075 
145 



24 


692 


3 


373 


5 


,361 


35 


,470 


37 


,242 



3 


286 


6,242 


9 


- 


- 


616 


502 


1,013 


24 


1 


- 


882 


370 


5,782 


,097 


1,976 


5,995 


139 


35 


6 


- 


307 


325 



9,664 
59 



287 
19 



2,520 


1 


709 


5,057 


136 




125 


3,451 


28 




_ 


87 


- 




2 


- 


3 




- 


- 


_ 




- 


- 


2,554 


1 


,812 


4,945 



-266- 



FEDERAL OUTLAYS BY AGENCY: FY 19 76 (Cont'd.) 
(IN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS) 



MONTGOMERY 



$33,765 

1,326 

32 

7,187 

16,391 



1,916 
1,523 



$286,295 


$143,023 


$18 


,424 


3,166 


1,081 




826 


9 


437 




- 


200,632 


41,259 




271 


41,488 


19,067 


11 


,530 


3 


184 




88 


17 


10 




- 


1,221 


3,341 




267 


- 


2 




39 


2,736 


2,312 




452 


5,801 


4,008 




983 


- 


14 




** 


2 


11 




- 



$2,130,454 

6,503 
137,538 
690,718 
758,937 

3,882 

3,426 

2,098 

10,571 

4,298 

15,196 

29,410 

528 

96 



2,196 
130 



14 



12,740 
1,574 



7,029 

70 

487 

746 



181,243 

209 

134,035 

14,042 



258 
98 



3,039 



249 

54,228 

162 



43,173 

25,001 

178 



1,919 



1,105 


5,247 


3,487 


1,191 


23,802 


541 


1,010 


393 


112 


2,522 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 


1 


517 


288 


37 


1,253 


- 


- 


4 


- 


195 


- 


- 


58 


- 


1,970 


1,140 

1 


7,093 


4,095 


807 


37,297 








(continued on following page) 


1 




-267- 







NO. 202 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION SUMMARY OF 



PRINCE GEORGE'S QUEEN ANNE'S 



Political Subdivision Total 

Department of Agriculture 
Department of Commerce 
Department of Defense 
Department of Health, Education 

and Welfare 
Department of Housing and Urban 

Development 
Department of the Interior 
Department of Justice 
Department of Labor 
Department of State 
Department of Transportation 
Treasury Department 
ACTION 
Agency for International 

Development 
American Battle Monuments 

Commission 
Civil Service Commission 
Community Services Administration 
Energy Research and Development Adm. 
Environmental Protection Agency 
Equal Employment Opportunity 

Commission 
Farm Credit Administration 
Federal Communications Commission 
Federal Energy Administration 
Federal Home Loan Bank Board 
Federal Mediation and Conciliation 

Service 
General Services Administration 
Interstate Commerce Commission 
National Aeronautics and Space 

Administration 
National Foundation on Arts 

and Humanities 
National Labor Relations Board 
National Science Foundation 
Office of Economic Opportunity 
Postal Service 
Railroad Retirement Board 
Selective Service System 
Small Business Administration 
Tennessee Valley Authority 
U. S. Information Agency 
U. S. Sinai Support Mission 
Veterans Administration 
Water Resources Council 



,227,699 


$21,725 


$149,250 


96,927 


1,098 


1,883 


111,959 


11 


211 


329,125 


973 


111,380 


191,093 


10,712 


20,874 


12,791 


- 


- 


11,741 


2,120 


_ 


614 


- 


2 


11,899 


153 


558 


468 


- 


- 


11,559 


332 


2,002 


41,727 


1,252 


2,931 


305 


- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


73,801 


2,196 


5,272 


45 


488 


- 


5,814 


- 


- 


29,257 


62 


53 



774 



29,274 

187,580 

253 

4,585 

26,304 
3,584 

1,158 
24 
820 



1,156 
187 



981 



2,123 
100 



60 



1,797 



-268- 



FEDERAL OUTLAYS BY AGENCY: FY 1976 (Cont'd.) 
(IN THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS) 



WASHINGTON 



$26,283 


$34,614 


$143,655 


$65 


,708 


$27,331 


1,466 


678 


2,230 


3 


676 


1,532 


- 


789 


366 




97 


** 


647 


3,306 


35,633 


2 


,957 


277 


15,435 


16,839 


56,854 


38 


,402 


15,927 


56 


3 


2,366 




3 


871 


- 


7 


24 




11 


- 


357 


355 


9,415 




610 


406 


- 


2 


7 




- 


- 


924 


2,517 


1,609 


1 


,403 


452 


1,316 


1,482 


6,620 


3 


,732 


1,437 


- 


- 


18 




182 


- 


" 


" 


83 




40 


" 


2,196 


2,636 


11,422 


6 


,150 


2,636 


- 


- 


215 




2 70 


- 



2,198 



323 



85 


25 


163 


178 


30 


29 


13 


27 


_ 


2 


3 


_ 



,312 


2,019 


4,574 


3,607 


1,519 


231 


207 


5,179 


573 


236 


- 


- 


- 


24 


- 


171 


10 


141 


_ 


83 


** 


72 


20 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


13 


- 


- 



6,596 



3,442 



Source: Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service, 
Federal Outlays in Maryland, December 1976 . 



FEDERAL EXPENDITURES BY 
FUNCTIONAL CATEGORY IN THE APPALACHIAN 
PORTION OF MARYLAND: FISCAL YEAR 1976 



FUNCTIONAL GROUPINGS 



APPALACHIA PORTION 
OF MARYLAND 



1975 Provisional Population Estimate 

Total Expenditures 

Child Development 
Total 
Per Capita 

Health 
Total 
Per Capita 

Vocational Education 
Total 
Per Capita 

Other Education 
Total 
Per Capita 

Community Development and Housing 
Total 
Per Capita 

Local Development District Planning and Administration 
Total 
Per Capita 

Research and Technical Assistance 
Total 
Per Capita 



213,700 
$8,223,058 



813,333 
3.81 



1,877,554 
8.79 



1,138,995 
5.33 



1,216,648 
5.69 



2,699,015 
12.63 



209,326 
0.98 



268,187 
1.25 



Source: Appalachian Regional Commission, 1976 Annual Report . 



ELECTIONS 

Maryland is often referred to as a barometer of national voting patterns. 
In 19 76, the voters of the State cast their ballots for President, giving 
Jinuny Carter 53,0 per cent of the popular vote, while nationally the Democratic 
candidate polled 50.8 per cent of the popular vote. In fact since 1932, Maryland 
has voted against the winning presidential nominee only twice, and these were 
extremely close ballots. 

There were nearly 1,943,391 registered voters in Maryland for the 1976 
general election. Of these registrants, 69.5 per cent were listed as Demo- 
crats, 24.1 per cent as Republicans, and 6.4 per cent either declined to give 
a party preference or were registered with other than the Democratic or 
Republican Parties. 

Marvin Mandel was reelected Governor of Maryland in 1974 as he polled 63.5 
per cent of the popular vote, carrying 18 of the 24 political subdivisions of 
the State. At the same time the rather independent pattern of voting in 
Maryland asserted itself as Senator Charles McC. Mathias, Jr., a Republican, 
was reelected to the United States Senate, carrying a popular vote of 57.3 per 
cent and 22 of the 24 political subdivisions. Democrat Paul Sarbanes polled 
56.6 per cent of the popular vote to unseat Republican incumbent Senator 
J. Glenn Beall, Jr. in the 1976 election for United States Senate. 

Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein and Attorney General Francis B. Burch, 
both Democrats, were reelected as part of the Democratic Party ticket in 1974. 
The 1977 session of the Maryland Legislature is composed of 165 Democrats and 
23 Republicans. 

The Congressional delegation of Maryland is composed of one Republican and 
one Democratic Senator, and five Democratic and three Republican members of the 
House of Representatives. 



00 00 CO r^ 00 



r-. 0^ O 00 

c^ ro m in 



■vtCTNOOO <ro^a^^om 

CNOvDONin COoOCNIf— iro 

iH CT\ <r rO iH I— I I— I 



r-- o r^ <!• o 

iH O LO O iH 

<r ro o 00 ro 



a o 



i O nH ,H vO 

) r-^ CN d 00 



>d- CN ro 00 rg 
ctn O cN -d- m 



<r ON r^ ^ CN 
ON 00 r-^ a\ O 
vo o ON m c^ 



o -^r en <r r 

ON t^ .— I 00 c 
-;r O CM r-- c 



ro o r^ ro ^ 



00 en 00 CT> 

O rH 00 ro 
in f^ ON 00 



ro cN CN o I 



CN vD CN <J- VO 

m CO ,H m <r 

ON -d- vc 00 r^ 

ON ON >d- o r- 

iH ON m m 



in CN 00 00 CN 
.-lvC.-l.HCsI 

vo in ON <}• vo 



vD CO CO vd- O- ,-1 



■><roooN cNvocooN 
-in<roN coooo<i- 
-OONON cor^ONCo 



vD .H r^ CO in 



o <r ON o 00 
o r^ CO r^ in 



00 CN CN CM CO 



vo <r cjN <r .H 

vc in 00 in CNl 

<r r^ .H in CN 

.H O 00 CJN 00 



rH r^ ON 00 CJN 



<: M 

H > 

hJ Q 

O CQ 

PM C3 



T3 

>.§ 2 S 

C )-i O O 4-1 

CO < E E M 

M -H -H 0) 

(U (U 4-) +J > 

.H C --I .H rH 

M C CO CT3 CO 

<j < pa m u 



M 




>^ o cu cn 


0) 


^ 


H 0) C - 


0) +J 


CJ 


^"^ ^^ 


C rH WO) 


•H 4J X) 


•H rH (U (U 


M 4-1 t-i T) 


o OJ eg m 


.-1 o .-1 .H x: 


QJ <U O t-l 


oo a c S J-i 


O >-i -H >-i O 


T) Vj IH CO -w 


4-1 C OJ <u 


M >-( O CO V-i 


OJ M )-i :5 c 


C -H QJ . E 


CO CO 0) x: o 


t-i CO CO O <U 


O t-i 3 4-) O 


a u u u o 


fe O K PC ^i 


S PM O- W C/3 



NO. 205 



MARYLAND GENERAL ELECTION RETURNS - NOVEMBER 2, 1976 
FOR PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

JIMMY CARTER 

AND 

WALTER MONDALE 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 
GERALD R. FORD 

AND 
ROBERT J. DOLE 



SUBDIVISION 



% TOTAL 
SUBDIVISION 



% TOTAL 
SUBDIVISION 



MARYLAND 



759,216 



53.0 



672,661 



A7.0 



Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 
Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



15,967 


50.8 


54,351 


47.0 


178,593 


68.6 


118,505 


45.3 


4,626 


57.4 


3,017 


49.2 


9,940 


38.8 


8,950 


53.3 


9,525 


55.0 


4,528 


48.7 


14,452 


44.8 


3,332 


41.8 


19,890 


45.0 


20,533 


49.2 


3,211 


53.2 


131,098 


51.7 


111,743 


58.0 


3,457 


49.8 


7,227 


56.2 


3,472 


51.6 


3,715 


38.8 


15,902 


44.1 


9,412 


47.2 


4,076 


46.7 



15,435 


49.2 


61,353 


53.0 


81,762 


31.4 


143,293 


54.7 


3,439 


42.6 


3,114 


50.8 


15,661 


61.2 


7,833 


46.7 


7,792 


45.0 


4,768 


51.3 


17,941 


55.2 


4,640 


58.2 


24,309 


55.0 


21,200 


50.8 


2,821 


46.8 


122,674 


48.3 


81,027 


42.0 


3,479 


50.2 


5,640 


43.8 


3,254 


48.4 


5,848 


61.2 


20,194 


55.9 


10,537 


52.8 


4,647 


53.3 



Note: All Write-in candidates received less than 1 per cent of the State-wide vote cast 
for President. 



Source: State Administrative Board of Election Laws, General Election Results; 
November 2, 1976. 



-273- 



NO. 206 



MARYLAND GENERAL ELECTION RETURNS - NOVEMBER 5, 1974 
FOR GOVERNOR OF MARYLAND 



SUBDIVISION 



MARYLAND 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 


REPUBLICAN PARTY 


MARVIN 


MANDEL 


LOUISE 


GORE 




BLAIR 


LEE 


FRANK 


WADE 






% TOTAL 






7o TOTAL 




SUBDIVISION 




SUBDIVISION 


602,648 


63.5 


346,449 




36.5 


12,968 


53.4 


11,325 




46.6 


46,711 


62.4 


28,107 




37.6 


111,991 


69.0 


50,356 




31.0 


106,783 


57.6 


78,453 




42.4 


3,720 


67.5 


1,792 




32.5 


1,993 


51.8 


1,856 




48.2 


7,712 


47.9 


8,375 




52.1 


6,335 


57.4 


4,707 




42.6 


7,513 


62.6 


4,493 




37.4 


4,060 


53.7 


3,504 




46.3 


12,164 


54.5 


10,136 




45.5 


2,614 


43.1 


3,457 




56.9 


17,196 


57.9 


12,494 




42.1 


16,170 


64.3 


8,967 




35.7 


2,768 


55.2 


2,244 




44.8 


119,717 


72.2 


46,185 




27.8 


88,573 


72.9 


32,865 




27.1 


2,333 


53.8 


2,007 




46.2 


6,468 


66.6 


3,243 




33.4 


3,102 


53.3 


2,721 




46.7 


3,122 


46.2 


3,632 




53.8 


10,308 


41.4 


14,563 




58.6 


5,922 


43.7 


7,639 




56.3 


2,405 


42.0 


3,328 




58.0 



Source: State Administrative Board of Election Laws. 



-274- 



MARYLAND GENERAL ELECTION RETURNS - NOVEMBER 5 
FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR 



1974 



SUBDIVISION 



MARYLAND 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

1 Talbot 

f Washington 
Wicomico 



DEMOCRATIC 


PARTY 


REPUBLICAN PARTY 


BARBARA A. 


MIKULSKI 


CHARLES McC 


MATHIAS, JR. 




% TOTAL 




% TOTAL 




SUBDIVISION 




SUBDIVISION 


374,563 


42.7 


503,223 


57.3 


4,962 


23.8 


15,893 


76.2 


28,404 


42.0 


39,180 


58.0 


85,525 


59.9 


57,331 


40.1 


89,866 


50.9 


86,651 


49.1 


1,948 


39.2 


3,023 


60.8 


1,260 


38.3 


2,034 


61.7 


4,865 


32.5 


10,102 


67.5 


4,090 


41.8 


5,685 


58.2 


4,088 


39.5 


6,270 


60.5 


2,131 


38.0 


3,472 


62.0 


4,397 


20.6 


16,938 


79.4 


1,286 


23.5 


4,197 


76.5 


13,077 


46.3 


15,182 


53.7 


9,938 


40.6 


14,561 


59.4 


1,559 


35.6 


2,824 


64.4 


49,239 


30.0 


114,850 


70.0 


45,961 


42.2 


64,443 


57.8 


1,847 


46.7 


2,111 


53.3 


3,176 


38.8 


5,012 


61.2 


1,962 


42.7 


2,631 


57.3 


2,110 


36.0 


3,744 


64.0 


5,837 


25.9 


16,690 


74.1 


4,206 


36.4 


7,353 


63.6 


1,829 


37.5 


3,046 


62.5 



Source: State Administrative Board of Election Laws. 



o > 

H M 



-* ^ CM <f in 



o CO in cr» vo 
<3- m CO CO <r 



>>o CO in ">o CO 



00 00 iH <Ti CO 
vO <f «* <f CN 



-* ■vf VO <f CO 

rH in in o 



CO o^ 1— I CO \o 
cvi 00 CO CM r-~ 
csj cN in vo CO 



(Ti 00 CO in vo 
00 0^ vO vO CO 

vo r^ CM in iH 



^^ 



< W3 

H M 

O > 

H M 



< o^ <r 00 r^ 



•* in vo \o r 



M 



ommHco in>^inr->.rH 
comi^iHvr cooOrHvoiH 
VOVOCOOON ooooooooo 



o-*i^voin sj-iH<yirgcM 

i-Hr->.r^-^r-~ r>»cocNinco 

invocvjcoin cyicooooo 

r^«;t00vOCM oor^co«sf(N 









CM r^ .H in CM 


<Ti 00 CM CO r-« 


CN O O VD r^ 


rM .H VO CM 00 


\0 CTi r^ in CO 
<r >d- r-- in in 


-;}■ r^ CM H 00 
^ CO in in ^ 


r^ .H iH CN <T. 

CO CO in m •^ 


CO 00 00 in o^ 
in in <r in -d- 



w < 



iH CM in vo CO in 

O O CO I— I vO 00 
iH 00 »d- 0^ tH r~ 



OOCO^OOOO iHCMOiOOCM 

oocoiHOvo iniHinvo-d- 

>d■cMO^^o^ incMcOiHr^ 

(NC>0000CO I— ICNJiHiHCM 



iH vD in CT> O 

00 CO rH CM in 

a^ r^ iH <r <j\ 



g OJ QJ 
C }-i O O 4J 

cd <: e B M 



<; HCjnJtOrt cdcOQjj^O j^cdcOOCU OwD 

g I^^pQpQO UUUUP P^OPSfflfc^ SPmO' 



q; >-i (-1 & C 

cd CO O (U 



i^r^^ 



< CO 



H W 

w o 

i^ 

W PQ 

PL, 

W W 

§i 

M Pi 



^^ 



>> 


w 


H 


M 


Pd 




Q-i 


g 


U 


<; 




CO 


H 






CO 






1 


1 


O 


PM 



H M 
O > 

H M 



o^ vo cTi m 
in CO <sj CO 



PO csl CO o 

CN rH sf r^ 

U-) CN in CM 





CO rH oo in 


in CO in cN* 
in \o >* in 



v^ r^ o> CO 
00 o^ O r^ 
00 >* r^ O 



O r^ r^ 00 
CM ^r vO iH 
<^ CO r^ ^ 



-277- 



NO. 209 

MARYLAND GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS - NOVEMBER 2, 1976 
FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN THE 95 TH CONGRESS 
OF THE UNITED STATES 
(*DENOTES WINNING CANDIDATE) 



CONGRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT 



DEMOCRATIC 
PARTY 



REPUBLICAN 
PARTY 



INDEPENDENT 



First District (-^^ 
Second District (2) 
Third District ^^^ 
Fourth District ^^ 
Fifth District (^) 
Sixth District ^^^ 
Seventh District ^^^ 
Eighth District's) 



Dyson 72,993 

*Long 139,196 

*Mikulski 107,014 

Fomos 69,855 

*Spellinan 77,836 

*Byron 126,801 

*Mitchell 94,991 

Davis 100,343 



*Bauiiian 


85,919 


Seney 


35,258 


Culotta 


36,447 


*Holt 


95,158 


Burcham 


57,057 


Bond 


52,203 


No Candidate 


*Steers 


111,274 



No Candidate 
Meroney 21,849 
No Candidate 
No Candidate 
No Candidate 
No Candidate 
Salisbury 5,642 
Ficker 26,035 



Districts include all or parts of: 

(■^^Calvert, Caroline, Cecil, Charles, Dorchester, Harford, Kent, Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, 
Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, Worcester. 



(2) 



(3) 



(4) 
(5) 



(6) 



(7) 



Baltimore City, Baltimore County. 

Baltimore City, Baltimore County. 

Anne Arundel, Prince George's. 

Montgomery, Prince George's. 

Allegany, Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick, Garrett, Howard, Montgomery, Washington. 

Baltimore City. 



' ° ■^ Mont gomery . 

Source: State Administrative Board of Election Laws, General Election Results: 
November 2, 1976 . 



-278- 



RECREATION AREAS 

The use of recreational land in Maryland is rather substantial. More 
than five per cent of the land area of the State is classified as recreation 
or open space land. As might be expected, there is considerable variation 
among the political subdivisions, with Garrett (18.6 per cent) and Allegany 
(16.1 per cent) Counties having the greater figures. 

It was estimated, using data from the 1970 Census of Population and 
Housing, that 1.8 per cent of the State's housing stock is comprised of 
recreation homes. Worcester County has the highest proportion in the State, 
followed by Calvert and Garrett Counties. Once again the variety of our natural 
resources is highlighted by this geographical dispersion of recreational 
activities from the ocean to the mountains. 



-279- 



NO. 210 
RECREATION HOMES, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1970 



POLITICAL PER CENT OF RECREATION HOMES 

SUBDIVISION (ESTIMATED) 

MARYLAND 1.81 

Allegany 1.00 

Anne Arundel 4.23 

Baltimore 0.70 

Baltimore City 0.51 

Calvert 17.49 

Caroline 2.02 

Carroll 0.36 

Cecil 8.96 

Charles 3.08 

Dorchester 3.62 

Frederick 1.66 

Garrett 14.76 

Harford 0.46 

Howard 0.80 

Kent 7.57 

Montgomery 0.33 

Prince George's 0.21 

Queen Anne's 6.87 

St. Mary's 5.88 

Somerset 4.76 

Talbot 3.88 

Washington 1.52 

Wicomico 1.33 

Worcester 36.45 



Note: The number of recreation homes is estimated as the sum of the enumerated 

seasonally vacant and migratory housing units and 30 per cent of year-round 
"other vacant" housing units. Thirty per cent is the percentage for the 
state that year-round housing units held for occasional use are as a 
proportion of all year-roiond other vacant housing units. The other portion 
of this total of vacant year-round housing consists of housing open for rental 
occupancy or for sale. 

Source: U. S. Census of Population and Housing, 1970. 



-280- 



NO. 211 



OPEN SPACE LAND AND SELECTED 
RECREATION FACILITIES 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



PER CENT 
OUTDOOR 

recreation 
area(i) 



CAMPING FACILITIES IN 
FORESTS AND PARKS 



NATIONAL 

AND 
REGIONAL 



MARYLAND 



5.2 



29 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Baltimore City 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



16.1 
1.8 
4.0 

11.8 
0.6 
1.0 
0.5 
2.7 
2.1 
6.5 
5.5 

18.6 
6.3 
3.5 
2.1 
3.7 
3.9 
0.1 
0.5 

10.7 
0.1 
3.0 
1.4 
7.4 






1 


2 








2 





2 


1 

















1 





2 


2 








1 





1 


6 





1 


4 








3. 


2 


1 


6 


1 


7 


8 





1 


2 





1 


1 








1 





1 


1 


2 


2 


1 








2 





1 


3 





1 


3 














2 


8 





1 


3 


1 


4 


9 



(1) 



Land classified as recreation or open space land as proportion of all land (does not 
include water areas) . 



Department of Economic and Community Development, Division of Research, 
Statistical Supplement to an Economic and Social Atlas of Maryland, 1974 ; 
Division of Tourist Development , Directory of Maryland Campgrounds . 



-281- 



STATISTICAL APPENDIX 



NOTES TO STATISTICAL APPENDIX 

This Appendix to the 1977 Maryland Statistical Abstract is divided 
into three parts. First is a series of tables which we anticipate to be 
of great utility to many users. Historical time series of many important 
economic indicators are shown by month, both unadjusted, and, then adjusted 
for seasonal variations. Many requests for such data are received, and it 
is hoped that this ready reference will format the material so that maximum 
benefit may be derived. 

Next is a series on prime contract awards by the Department of Defense. 
This series has been added as the result of increased interest shown in the 
topic by the citizenry of our State. And, fortuitously, very timely data 
were received just as this publication was going to press. 

Finally, we are pleased to present a set of tables depicting selected 
demographic characteristics for Maryland, federal outlays by major federal 
agencies and federal outlays by major functions. 



»<»or-a:avor>-c 



voxsr^r^octcca 



> 



>£>cr^f^occ oo 



t- 



lli Ki o in vD fvj o ;t cr 
CO v£aK- — cc»r 



<_) v£ 00 \0 CM C CM ^ ^ 

>c>cr^r^cccc aCT 



a. 

<,HI^0uXOf^'HK5 



-jojr-^trooCT-'O:* 

3•or^r^<cc^o^c 
;j a- o o oj «\J IT nC »o 

"3cuD'O!0iOX(\ -^ 



O "JCuD'OaOXCNJ^ 



M eoor>-a5 0^crr>-^ 



vOvCf~-r^t^<Ecra' 



cr 

Q.axv^'^ou-oino 



_i ooinKVvceoo^ 
a «0'co'0vc^0'0^'^ 

►^ 33 



Q^. ....... 

u, c r- IT vo o^ r^ vO I'l 



e5«« 

— IT CC vC tr 3^ -O IT -^ 
-J rjMji ^ iri Jv >o o ^ 



\j^r^ovOf^-Hi^ 



irvCf*-f~^ XfOCT 



►H fvjoeod-'O^OvOO' 



^x) ^,cr~-r^coaoo' 






< UJ 



i/i 



r> <ii . . •••••• 

•H >-ij.xpno^cMr^'HX'0 



*<0 3-r^CMnii>^ 



iDlTvO-Cf^r*-** 



n j3X)r^i^a3CCT> 



oao'^fM'O^if) X>^- 
<r«.r^f-^.^-^-t«-^- 
llJCT> 3> ^ CT" o CT> CT> ff> 






■^jfoa-aa^inir 



u ••• 



j'.\C^'Ct^f-~r^a: 



> 

c <£ 1^ c a- c «£ ir ^ 






QL 

l/l vO O * (T^ ^ "1 X -H 



c 



C— aK;f^<vif 30 






^t^-mcsi^DO-inr^ 



iriTvOvcr-r-r-a 



^(^f^^o<M^•- 



iriTsCvcr'f^f^c 






_j 



^ vO POtt if) '^ 0~ J> 
2 

< cvj tree o r* <\j (j> O" 
Simcvx — rvii^- 
irirx'-rf^r^f^x 



X 

at 

B 

uj 3 <\j •- o 3" r^ <\j r* 



D^^sCCcro-fveD 



0(M>C3(\IOsOvC 

t~ <3-t^CT>'<r^CNjeot^ 

uj iTirrxir-f^f^a: 

>- 
o 

Q. CC 

UJ irLf>%o>or^r>-r»-(c 
Zq: 

<UJ 

>- (r, ....,.» 

tt c<vr<\jeoir<\j*<oo 
<uJZ*r^o.Do-^jio 

-J 

r-<x 

V ujcecoca^^oin^ 

•^ >-u. :t vO o j^ o o if)a> 

< 
z 

trz 



UON jv a\ j\ 3\ 0^ 7> o» 



u.iro-^<Mio*in«r- 









<M^f>-d^r^*(vjo 



cǣǣK:i<-tr ^^ec 



cco:ifira>£ir<\, 

zirr»-r>vOair<\io 






o »o <o r* o iCio ^ o^ 



OvOt^(7>d't^f*-« 



i/iir)vOi^xoo«\j<vjo> 



o 



"3 IT r' cr r^ (yo CM o 



— o) ^c CD r^ ^ 0" o^ 



t- c^:*;r^c^c^J-HC^ 



K)^f»-lOeOCr<X50 

0. • •• 

t/iirr- r^ vC CO fo oocr 

r-^eoeOCMT'Hir 
o 

TXlvCXI^-ffifVJOVJO 

z 

3 * IT OJ f\J O <\l (Vi * 

"3 'X) iC X f^ (7* f^ CVJ O 

< (C -^ o o <o d- r-r- 
SiD^cccr-f^'Ofv.o 



{\jioiBiro^CT><y^- 



3(J>3(OlO<\iCT>»-i 



2 K)0»o>ojo.^*ir 

U Q<. ••••••• 

3 Q.in(o^crircN/K5co 
o>-i 

Z (T 



r- jioj-^fMcrajKjin 



r>- <3] • 

N. UJ<r3''000(\J3-0 
O _l ^»H^ 



*'HO^^Ovor^-oc\J 



V/)Z 

uj-j * .0 cor- f^ -« "orvj 



ti. ac o -H<%j fO * ;n -0 f- 



A-4 






> 



> 

cr aa K.ir r- >£ u 






irf^irooc(virec 



Q. 



K)oa)O0"O\cr^ 
c 



lOoo-^r^eciniT, 
_i 



2 



3>f<~-3^jj3^irr^»cir 









CD ••• 



irz 



2 *<rcccr<\jcuor^ 
uj a 

o« 
zee 

<UJ 

Jt/1 (M'HCCOOxCfMt-i 

>- q: 

z> 
-} 

r^ <CD 

o_j 

< 
z 

irz 

< < to KJd- tf 3^ \0 r^ >o 

v> 



OCT o^cNi»n * irtvor*. 






u • • • • • • 

LiJOOCVIvCOX 
<M<MOJC\J(V)<NJ 



> • 

CC'-OOi'-'C 






CO aetr-ciT 



ooocjo^j-vO 






a30-<«3f0t0 
Q. 



Q. 






tV,(\.Ov.MCVC\. 



"3 ^ iDiT CO lOlO 



z 



Q. -J J-lTirCVJlOlO 






< ai^ioir-HOd- 



►- {v(\jcm(Vjoj<v 



(vjvOirar-iT 



< aoinr»cj-Htn 

Z (/!< Jl If) l/TO TO 
jj <\|{\if\(C\J(M<Vi 



_i coin<oa>ovO 
>- a: 



>- (r • 



r- 35 X 



r- <2 



lij cvjiooo<\j(J> 



O OC\JO»^lO»^ 



C\J(\J(VCMOOCVI 






It QC(MiO* ■•/'>«'* 



A-6 






IOCCOO<C« 



*<0(rroir* 



c<vt\.ciru"(y 



i-ir«<c(rin 



OKiJ^iOCJfVJCVJ 



Q. 



h-*o^inifta> 



o 



"J<03-^cvc\ic\j 



Q. "JiOd-d-CVOfO 






O V 



(M<va)<oior» 



5rtir^(\.<vfo 



h-frirKiir>\0 



£•••••• 



a-ioioio.'vjir) 



2 IT 

< liJ 

>- a 

(r Q<or^ojo<\jr- 



r- Q NOvO^rOJIiS 



_J"J0j>O3TO(\jrvj 



tnz 

<t «t r- IT ma^ fo * 






UJ ^ O CT*(J» CT> CT* 



A- 7 



Q^-^OOO O 



«3-oo>a>r< 



> 



cctrmrf"-* 



tu(rctr<joc o! 



Q. 

UlvClTCVJ^triT 



z 






o 



iroK>n<Mn 



<-l-t-HOOo 



:r 



n 



(/•.Z 



Z X 

o ameoir^irr"- 
z lyxt-^-H-Hooo 

z a: 

< UJ 

_itn CT>r-ooKvo 
>- a: 

z »- »<.~^^^-. 
in 

-3 

r^ <i) 

o _j ^^^^^^ 

z 

o r«-oo^<of^ 

l/)Z 

«««<£)«* IT 






u.ocovj'O^inor*- 



A-8 



Oo^xsecoro 



«c*<\)r^K-< 



> 

Cf^acu 



2afO,£)f^a(\ 









Q. 

UJCrooa-iTCToo 

•-<\J«\J<VCV.K. 






c 



ffloevvDr^CT" 



2 -H<vf\cvf\jtr 




-I 



z 



3 eoirif)in»o(vi 
»- >- 

O <0:»-OIOC\JO 



2 i/xin^iOd-r^o^ 



>- cr 

SI- — CVJCVitVCWCVJ 



otT'cvjrsiinin 






irz 



f*- <D 

'H>-lJLd■(^•H^^fiCC 



O o^o^OiOCM 












KXSfOCVJOO) 



> 



(rtMoa-trw 



oo-Hoa>o^o 






>ovr)meoa'>o 



,i5«lOKKM r- 

Q. . . • • • • 



•tc^^croo 






o _i 

-I z 



O _l • 

0. -joocxj- (j> 






cvjocTvCcrr' 






i^r~ir»ir)<M 






r^ ^Of^J^X)«(^<o 



•- o s^o<^^ -•<M ^o 
^ <.n . . • • • . 



oj cMt\iio>e<vjr^ 












A-10 






> > 






a ZQ. 



e • i/)o»»»«»» 



3-1 a_l 

u "Jt^r^xf^r^r- o "3f^xxr-r-f^ 



z 

^<vjxxa c rxo^r^xcr 

xxt^r-r- z -jr-ojxr-r-i^ 



< <r^a«\ixx(j> 
t- 5t^r-xi^r^r«- 



2 CroXCMCTX Z ^<MO3-.-<0 

<■ ac < tr 

cr ar^cr-^xr^x tr tLXCT^fvjxxx 

o D»- 

z zir 

4 < u 

-J r^iroiniocr _n/i ox*oo>m 

>-a: >-x 



t^D r- <a3 

\ ujr>-xoxf^f^ V ujx®ocy>x« 

'^ Lj.r^r^xr^r^p~ -h >-u.r-r«-ir-r^r»- 

Olfl o _i 

•-• < 

X z 

UJ a>o*xcvicgo o r«-.o^vOin<M 

v/!Z lyiz 

«>cr^oCT>xx <<r»X'^0"Xx 

_»-3f^f^x'>-r^.'^ uj"3r»r-xi^i^(^ 

< in 






fOtMlTvC — ec 






*3^oeo<00 



OI^(MOO-H 
C f^ IT K- r- If ^ 

K-.K-.iTfririr 






Q. 



^«vO<0>0(M 



r.K>K>l<llOK) 



K «S 

z 3f\<irair<\jc 
UJ «n:t^^^t^ 

>- 
O 

-I 

Q. (Ooa-d-vCd) 
S _J 

UJ D^vCaiT^O 

o 

X 

z 

_i r<v-Necir«vc 

cr 

< 
1/1 

UJ 

o X. 

o 

z 
< 

>- a: 

q: <or»«oir<vo 



lOKwocrr* 



iCK-rOK-inio 



oKT^r-cr^H 



-3i0 3-:tJ1£l^ 



3-K)CMOvO(X5 



f^(M-'*d-{T' 



UJ rOKjtOiriOi^ 
Z IT 

_ji/i o>vf)f\j'HirKi 
>- a: 

«t UJZ-VJ^^il 0.O 
2 »_ (r.K".irK-.K,ir 



I*- 03 

V UJvCfDvCKKTf^ 

^ u.'H'OKia-d-if) 



3-*iDr»off> 



< iTifOromK)!^ 



oa^.'vi'Oj- jiD'^- 



A-12 



^Q -♦^OajinsO:*- 



o _j fnirtnmmm 



O d-^^-^l^f^ 



l/l lOfOtOKIlOlD 



U.a^'M'OJlDvO^- 



C<MOeO«OK5 



> 

circca o ctv. 



Cireccccc*. 



oirr^o o o<\i 



Ql O 









z 



z X 

i-i Q.(VvOTa3(TO 



OXlf) * vO« 



X <j(\.ir«x co<r 



r tr 

•-• Q.tOr^O(TO^ 
UJ 

Q»- 

Z (T 

< UJ 

>- X 

< ujzr-f^'^'*-'^* 
z •- 



r^ D 

V UJ— 3^<ox«<r 



o J 



ij ox)in*^4r- 
rz 



trz 



U-aceMio^iDvOf*- 



A-13 



QMiOiOiOiOK^ 






ocMtninminm 



Q. 

ujiroioa-ir-H 



or^oo^cvj^ 
_i 

2 Z 

O "-—<- — 

Q. 

z ^^^^^^ 

UJ 

z 

UJ a: 

> Q.-aoc\mKi<\( 

O «\JrOmfOiOFO 

< 

(T -<c\jr^<\jr'(\j 
ui X 

Ul scvjrg'O'OKTO 
u. ^^^^„^ 

r- a 

V UJ-CCOID^tO 

'^ u.c\jc\j<nOfO«i 
oiyi ^^^^^^ 

a: 

UJ (Sl0>0l/)^0 
i/5Z 



o 

UJCO-HiDiOiOO 

> 

ZfVjtTtDKJK^lD 

CCaCMMT 
OfNJl^romrOrO 

e\Jf^3-3-CU<0 

a 

UJ<OOID3^ID^ 

e> 

-I 

I- (C-^CUtOX)-^ 

z z 

UJ 3ironmr»r) 

o ""^ 

a. 

z crocTKi^o 

z -,-— ^^ 

UJ 

z 

UJ a: 

OUJ ^^^-c-^-. 

-itr 

<UJ 

UJ cr 

ujujzovifvj'OiO'Oio 
u.»- ^ — ^^«^ 
to 

T 

r^4X 

V uj>e<coird-io 

0_| «^^^^^ 

< 

z 

o i-ioood-in 

i/iz 

aJ~3C\jr\J'0r<T0/0 



UJO>(7>O»0»a»(T> 



<f»-r^r-f^i^r>- 



A-14 



iTxiT'^r-a' 









00-<CvjrOrO* 



Q. 






F-ectn <vr>-a^ 



OOOCNJ fOfOd- 



XOjtV 



r-4-H lOKI^ 






-I 

3<\joecoiro 



; <\j(V<\j 



■3 = =-H POd-3^ 






fVJCVJtVJCVOJCVJ 






< tr 






_i d-trcc I 
<. a: . • • 



I 0>>£o 
I <M (Vcy 



r~ voo-H<ocoo 
r*- 1X3 

OV/1 <\JCvl<\l(MCJC«J 
VUJ 



^ryCM tMCMCVJ 



o .033-^ mO'in 
irz 






Od'O^^CD 



K1K1lOK5IO(n 



-^*jT^^in 



> 



triririr.tr.ir 



OnCC^OJ-h 



irnoiOfoioK) 



oooinr>-<vr-- 



Q. 



ujc-^cvr^oj^ 



r.irmicrriD 



c>r^o>o®m 



« -<<MOir<M 



_i . . . . 



2 



K)d-'Ha)ir<o 






a: 



sOvOO*iO®K} 



oto KiniotoiOK) 



r^o^«3-0(n 



< iciOfDtrsirio 



z tr 

q: Q.ir>voeoK5on 
UlLrt < f\J -o 3- vD f>» f^ 

o tr 

«« cr 

1/1 

-J 
f. Q OC0O(\ir»--H 

r^ <a3 ...... 

z 

V/1Z 

<<**— ocrvj 

I/) iTfOrOfriOiO 



A-16 



0«0>X3ir(D<VJO 









tnot^;t\rnn 



<v<\;<v<\(<\.{v 



oj^o^cira-r*- 



Q. Q.'^:*Of^irK1 



> a: 



03 



U52 

< <\JCVJCM<\J(\J(\J 






•IO-*«MlO<0 






a. 

(\,(V<ViC\i{V,<\J 



e • • • • • • 



-I 









-I a: 

Q. aoa^oi^ip^ 

ujq: 

•-• {/) '^o* *r^ cueo 
> tr 

or o<0"iocj>vOir* 

-3 

N <i) 

\ UiCC — XvClTd- 

o_i fvjfgcvjfvjfycsj 

Z 

u;z 

UJ"JJ- 0.01^330* 



(_) CO ojc <snf) -^ cc o K>r« sO in cT* (M 

UJ O" •-' iTin •-• fVI CC IT f^ !C -< f\j O^ (O 
iT 3- U1 :» ^ 3- vC •O XVsO '^(C O^ it) 



o*ir)'0-<r.-Hr--«c ®or-<MD 



M CO d' * lO 3- r^ IT »r IT 






>ir <£ — cvjiTio * ox r^ ID ec -^ CM 



irK-,CV.<V.K-,Ca*d 



r-. i^%03v£ir 



u ^ cr IT <M a- <\i ;? ic K-, -< r>- IT vO -< 
c^vC-^ — — ~ — 



_^ >3-cra--<m 

OvC cNjvOooo* vOo<cc-a*CT><\io<eo 

IDK)CVJCVI(VJCa* :J^ir (niTvOlTiT. 



Q. CC fO K) <C 1^ 'Ht^ O" Cr T "H vO f^ (T 

IT r~- X -c T -< (C X cu ty vC (T f^ (^ -H 

Ou C\, -H ^ CV, ^ <\1 K-, CVJ (^ K-, IT 3 a^ 



ujf^ ir ru r^ r- c <vj 3- >£) cc c vC a CD 



c Ki o cc e <r <\. IT IT a cc (vj cr cr i«i 



iriocufOi^fOi^vcrr 



lO Kl CV.<\Jf<1 COtTHT) »rir ir>C IT If! 



_J 3N m ;r IT iT r» 35 IT) CXMT) cc X ^ 

^ 3^ <\.a X <\. cvj c \C X — r* d^ ^a 

-jxcro-^'oa-Ta^a-'^ooavO 



D«o ^fCvOCT r^iTirm* roa^ca- 
io* ^vc <\iiri vcxr^ d- vO ^tn 3- "H 



^Jl^cvlocVlC^JK^^3^ (r j\Cif)>o 



5 G <\jr>- -..'^ Tr^ :*■ XO^ X a-lDiD 

— - -^(MiDfrcufMira-* 






^irxj-xr-cxKia x<vo"r^r>- 
"JK5 ^if) oiT xr^ sO o X X c\jcr a> 



a K) <\, r <\J <\l IT aif) K7 K1 r- iT IT 



i-t >-^iox3'Oojinoi/)^a^ox 

t- <d-O^C(TXr-a«f\-vOvO>D^CC7^ 
2 (\J<\j^(VI(\J'HK)fV|i«1f\j(\jr^** 



5 1^ iT X <M m a- r- -H IT) X a> a IT) ui 



lOlOCVJfTfOfV 



a-'OKitrinifi 



a: ,0 jxj^f*- J^^a-o^-HX^xr* 
Q.ir!r^x(vj<vnr!^r^ox '^^-^^- 
<l d- X xr^ "O rvK/Tor- c\jc\jr)t*- »o 
3- (Ni^cocvj^'^'OioiO'or-*^ 



^ a:or>-<NjLnxr^xoCT>r-f^'0<Mro 
suj lnr^c^)Oc^J^Wl03•rOlOcom^n 



ct^3-r^r-i^TX3-x— o 



ra-XTMMXX 



• r)r-3-c7^(^3- 



\ ^ K1 C\l — (\ r<~, fC <\J K-. X 3- 3- 



QC QJXiDXlOlDiOOC^-^rVJXX-^tNJ 
> UJZ* *d-t\JX'0XXCVJMOtT>'0(r 

<H- 3^ir<vj3-cucv.fr)3-d-tr3^f^ir* 



r» X xr^JiJ^ ■O'HOj^'Ojir^T' XCT> 

V UjirXJ-CVJXrO^XXr^ '^ITIX^ 



r^ <ccxxirx-H(TiDx<Nj'H'0* 



u:z £xxcr'0<\i'^<7'XJitnxir.io 



t/1 z r« f>. if) r- o (T <vj oj 3- X 3 r>- r^ r* 
< < 3 (vj X X (M r^ 3 f^ <Nj iTiTi cr iT o> 
'xi "> X 3- !J< r) o JTO u> r^ -o o X 'M r^ 



o ^ 3- Ji o (^ X J* 3 -^ <M "O * Ji X r^ 

«4X X fi rx cr^f^r-i^r^f^P^^ 

jj a^ 0» !T> O^ T" T O^ 7» ^ 3^ J> J* C7* <7> 



LijO» (Jv ^ (J» (J> CT> ON (7* CT» <7> CT> CT> O* O* 



>oiririnr<\iootOw>o(M« • 



o • 



cir»rir»rircCeC<virir<CfCcC<C 



o*j*irairi^.r.*^t\.ir»rir 



<\j <r -^oa ec »r lOvc <Mir o<o • 






CO '^ oo (Mio lf)^» r^ o vO ® «oo o 
UJ* <c tr * * * m * * IT r) nirio 



uj* icir K)io* n* nirm in<\j<M 



r> ^ o> <j> «\j .HT- r- r^ « m eo * <r 
o • 

13 IT) IT * mvo mm IT- IT * * »mo * 



o 

3 * mm * * lo K5 lo in Kj ir cwj * 



D * ifiir ** *a- mm * 3- in»o lO 



D**a-m**mmm*mmm<\j 






o a-r^ ,o.^^r^cM ino»ir m m>o 
w^a-S'm^^mmmmmmmcM 



CVKNJ (\j o>« in >c o o> * o o* ff> * 



***«HO*r»o«»*o**a> 
«*m***mmmm*mmmtM 



m«) (\j*o> IT— omeoirof- * 

(T 

Q-^md-mmmmmmmmmmm 



r^ ^4>c « m cr * m >o o in o> mot 



« 'I m (\t* m^ •4in o * m«o o 
<m***mmmmm*m*i»)* 



{^ *9<mm<\joa)tr>*m(\j.o<oio 

V ujmm*mmm<vjrgmmm*(\jm 

^ u. 

OU) 



V ujm*irmmmmm*mmirmm 



UJ «mmr-mvO(Mo«*>4irinin<o 



o o(^o«4^>om<^ir>*«o(^o 
IftZ •••••••••..••• 

<<* mir*m*mmm*mm«j lO 



0(r * mvO r«-4 9>o •H<M m* t/vo r> 
< vO >o sO %o >o vOf^ r^ r- f^ r- r>* r- r^ 



u.a:*in,or*-«(T>o^(Mm* ir<or- 
< ■a >a .o vD ^ -a r>- r- r^ r~ f«- f^ f«- r- 

UJ O* CT> 0» CT* C7< CT> (J> 3^ 0^ C 0> ^ 0> O* 



A-19 



O • 

c <V<V^^^».<V,^^ <V.— (V— 

z 

-< * >c<o \C o r^ <c c ff >c vc >o r^ 



O C <\i 3- lOCVJ IT K5 a (MT K) vC » 






r^o 3-3^ a^a r^>ccec N sC<£r«- 






O -^<VJf\J fflO vO IfXVJO (OO lOO 



e 

< 

m cvj j-r^K)— iaco<\joo<c<\ifn 

O <\JOvC<MOiri»5^(f»«*-iO 
x 

»- < 

<t 

tr 

u. 

u. * f^f^io^oioira>vOCT'-^'H»H 

O X. 

>- < «\j-^ ^^„^^ rv)«^ 
I*. S ••••••••• 

inz 

_^<cv ^^ 



oa: * Ji^r»co»o-H<\jK)^ir),or*» 



CO a f*- ^ ifif^ cr (T r^ vO « (H irr- 

«£• 



ocNix-HX-oin 



IT IT fVJO; ir« MT lO vC O CT- rr OJ 
X 

<UJ 

tri-1 

ti. UJ 

O X 

>-o<rucNj ^^^-^^ ^(v— ^ 
I/) 

r- <cQ .............. 

< 

z 

o oo»3'r-;/io<M»ioo»otO(Otn 

cnz 






A-20 



%jmsO<oo\De\i^'^'Oin^o • 






»-a> ^ooo*lf>ol^^c^^u^lf)'^ 



a<M.*t^'Oif)ir)iotoo«vr' 3 



tsa- 3-^ xifi <vj<Nj o 



o -H IT cu vO oio d^ <e <\j 



z cvr^ifi « ovj <\jff> CO CM oio r» X) 



u « oo o '^r^ *\n i/1 o^ Kxr .o ♦ 

Q » 

• 

CtV tV. ^^^^^tV K« 

■^ » 

• 

o * 

* 

a,tCco<Hir)vOs0^ir»o<o(\j;D • 
in ♦ 

ri <vi CO — "- '^ -"^ "^ -^ '^tv <vi '^ 

-J 

2r» :»in '^vn 3-0 co^oa- j> a 



rHCM'HCOCVJOJ^ 









trr^ * (\i j-to s cNj 'H iD £»OfO cv 



1/1 <^ro<\ica-< 






Ld CT> 3^ (7> (J> 7> CT> CT> <J* O* 0» O* (J* 0» 



U.I/X 
ol 

in« 

UJUJ 

Zl/1 

-J 
t^Q «.•.. 

r- <X^lOfM(7>vO»H^(7>3-PO>£0* 

o_i 

< 

2 

o 

ir 2 £K5 X X XlOlO OlTCr-CCVJl/l 



u. ac i/i o ^- s (3* o ^ <M lO ^ in .0 r- 






c — c 3<cu- ^£ <\ J^ ^O ir<VCT » 



h-in^(Mv03''CifiN<\)>c-Hior>- » 



t-ovoxo*ccxcrccv£ccin -< • 



3 <\r» fo c\j ro if> o> o r>- if) in # 



n: 






^CVCVJ rOCg 



e oir at^ o cr o ec o ID «\j a; r- o 

< sir r- >or^ >a o -H o CO in ^ or- 

^^^ ^oj^^^ocviinto 



z rcjr-3-t^vOCvCO ca foo <v x 
< <*c\j*x)vCincrccccvjji »r a- 



_i -<r«- fvj eo in CO * o o in <\)f^ tc (M 

D lOfO — <\J O in O IT O »D tn K1 3- o 

"5 « a- -c 1^ 1^ in a- -^ (j> to =0 ^o « o 

-H,0 K1CUC0 



n^incooiDojcvjo r " 



li. -1^- 



-5fO<\jBc\)vOa-a>cvjinnroa a ~ 



>- r>- CT> o a -H r^ »H vo flo o a c\j (O CO 

< r>- CM <C ® O' -«M ^0 »0 vC 0» a vO o^ 
2 CM cc a — c a> CM Cii t^ a -< <: <v c 



»-^r«motO7>aD-^oa-.0£ ^^ 
<irr^f^vCaa-cc3-r^-^or>- in — 
a-Cinx-^ aa 



ir zix!ffxcci»r 



I/) Q.ino<Min-^ojCT>r>-inoioi<)inCT> 
uj <o.HCM~o«t^a-a-aa>(\jotOf>- 



^to^cvj^r^vO'H 






— lO-iAJ-i^ XI — 



q: <c — CO o in ji (> (^ in X) a- <\j a- vo 
«a— r^oicin>r;in— — r-D(0<\j 
Z'-»co a—a'O a!Oa-3» ajcr-ofo 



-faJS-OT-t-onna-o 



a— ^— vo . 



r- xouaaajargsoincvjoueinmio 
V vucvj— lOCMioO' JincvO'vOin— <M 
— u. j>— ininjio>ox— f\io— >ca 



— — o<oino*io — 



naoincvaa c — (\j ^-p>- 



lOc\J— ro— 



1/12 o(\j cvjcMin K5 a ec 0> 1^ X K5 oeo 

<xa— ar-<E(rxar-ecao« 

-nioxr^co— coooxc^r-inxui 



-— CO— OJ 



<<accirxcr^ioxr.rrx ir x 



. >-r^r«-f»r-r^ 



j.irarKOi^xcj>o— rvjoa^ o r^ 



o <Vi-< ^t^ cr >D -Hi^ IT 3^ lOin t^ 

»r) r^ a^>£, o iT cc 3 in r^ O" * 

C CC f^ IT OXT in CJ a C C K! 



Oin K- - 



*^ in^oocin c-<-<incr d- 



>ir* eerier I- c—x irm cr 

z r) K)N (\min ec cv c 3- 1 ^ r- 
r^ iTKv ^ c c-< a IT X a K-, oc 
r^ icr^a f^<r f^r- fo 3 mm in 



>t^ 3 3CNC<C£T>in3-a»t^K5 

o xa— a.acI;<c»^^n^n^-^• 



^- -^ o occ o « lo cj' (T -^ lOf^ fo 

c>r^or^a\C3 ^inoo^o^join 

o cr X) 3-in otn lo -H cM'i o 3- r^ 

ec — -^^«^ ovo <r vXD r- o r^ in 3 

<or» ooo^ ro oj r) 3- nO r^ CT^ csj r^ 



Q. >C fO OCC >D eC 3- O K) O OCT >D 

uiec c a a- ojcj t^ o ^ a c >c oj 
uim c\j in vT 3 c\j CO c X \D c in cr 

« n « K5 K>C C ^ Kl <\J (\. in K5 

— vojin 



o(rocrcrcc3-xr--< 



o* omooncvjiocj^crr^-a^ioro 
<c <v)oa3-r-in<c3ir)3vO(\, 
a «craiocMK^ioinioa3o^m 



am c7>r-ininv£)-^ir)f>--«<CvOf^ 
ujo r^3a>cinc(caxcccro 
wicvj * \00"'0 3--<3-xin'Oo^^ 
~ J- ocrcccra^r^f^invo 



-"-^-•CO-HfVitV 



3ojin^ircr<t- 

^^r-fOvC® in m. ^3 a a o 



OK) irx3-t\.<r3 3ininr-3c\j 

3>c xr-<\jin<vjvO<\<r3-3 3^ 

<»H t^ r- KICK) Kiocvjfvi in r^r^ 

{\j r- cofnoM3ino^sO»HCM 

-^ vCin^occincvjo^ca-o^ 



_j fv CD c\) ro \C <c or- in fo vO in o 

3h-3 f^vC vC miovc ^oec c (\j 

"3 vC "O f^ in r>- in in CD in CT> -^ vO CT> 

toccr-^cca ecinrrxM-^r^a- 



j^ oCT^vOc^or^oj-in-^a- 

oa —cc— foinrwccvif^cMcr-^ 

"3tr coj-XfDCTvO'OinvO'^JOc 

ec 3- inc(^f>-«vj3-incin<TsC 

cc '^o^o^cc«^P0vdn>C3ccr^ 



Z ZC0a^-HXvDOC\)C\)h-vDff>3-< 

c DccNr^ir^r-or^inoar^r^* 

•-I "5roo»3inx)'Hin3-incC'^d- 

»- cMrvvC^oo-Hooor-a-of^ 



2 2CVJ ^•t\j3 3r--*n^r-3-io 

o z;o <cvCc<cvocirvCcroj3«c 

»-i "3c\i -^■oc^3■co(^J<T'(^^^od•3■ 
^- <v oDoocvjm^c^r^ccin 

< CO CM (C-HO^C^^r)3■OC^JyOr»3• 



2 5vC(\.'c\-£o»ocrca;f^af^ 



< in (\j r- -^ o 3- 3 3 lo o vo vX3 oo 



ain^of^cxjr^ci 



a cro.Hr^oj>(Mr>-ir)inoono 

K Q.ininr^O'^^xfvjin^ooK) 

ui <3-x(\Jin.oinr-inv0 3-r^3-o 

z xrocrxfOvC^OfOfVi-Hininx 

o -^o-r-vCd-x-^r^ojinfi^ cvj 



m vC vc in iT. -^3 (vr^ o tt o 3 

ODOXf^ »OXa» d-J^iOCT^^H oj 



t- afvj 3- vC^oxfO-^toincvr-oj 
i/)i/i<tx fl 3^\Ja^>o^^<^Jf^•^^^lno^ 
ziu ■£! o o^foor^»o»oxocrinoj 
o»-< lo cxr-inx-ivCoa-^Kj^ 

_ll/5 

< irfO'Olnc3•^x)3■^•3•x^0Ku• 
»-o<ff cvj 3— or^mvcxiof^tvifo 

0UJ2O *n)0 7>07*-Ot^(M-0 3- 

Kt- o — cainx(\ird-rrcvj3-cg 
1/1 o^ .^xr^ 3xo^<\iinfvj3-o 

3 -« rt '-•-tfVI'-t^^iO 



-H u.o-Hin£cj^t^oc\j3^.nx. ._. 
oi/i K)K>oc\)(3^ain^>or-Ov0 3 



o _j n * <T<r3 3 3-ininx j^fvivO 

VJ O O XXCVirOXO-HXfO** 



I/) 2 * "O r*- cvj cr >£ X 3- o^ fo K1 m a 



v/i2» 0^ ^lnxxxoc^J<^JXu^^- 
<<« <\iox(M>oooo»-icrf^ 
UJT* -■vjf^r) o-nr^r^cvjo-tvOio 
»/) ♦ xxjor^rvi^inrocrj^r^o 
« o{rf>-^(\jocar^3 3cro 



o tr J^ >o r^ « i7> 3 ^ CMK) 3- in-o r^ 



i.q:ji cr^xcT>o-H(Mio3inx)f^ 
«X XXX£r»r^r»-r^f>»r-t^r«. 



o cr K) -* <v, iT X -H -^ cc rjj- o 



oo ca- (v.iOK)Ofo d-c\jK) K) 



ZlO^irX — iT tVd-O- X XvTv 

«£ sC r- >c <\. ir X CK. n£ r- K-; 
mirxa^r-X(\'-(\covj<vj 



>ir a^c xa 3t»- — <\.'-'-^x 

ci^Od^x^Ni.cTco>c^a 

>c vC K, a- fcif -cc »c r^ c IT CN, 

vC \CO iT X CT" K) ^ CVJ-^tOK) 



►-vfiKi^f^xroioxrjX'HO 

O rvjXX X t\JX 3-<\l IT IT JTO 

oo^-HCT^ =>n of^ ;s-a XnO 

KJXO^CMvCX'^O-— XX 



»-<y> (7> >c r^ X vC-^ (or- for* If) 

o IT -fi (vj fi cv >cx cr * ^ >c lo 

o o o j^ >o "^ o^ lo r^ potT) X * 

<r »r<\, >£ -H ^ 3^ (V; cg * X X 

vor-i^-<-<x(\jio«x-«tr 



Q. r- r- (T — d- iTi j^ vc -^ f^ X o 
UJ3- IT a '--'vc r CT T ^x c 

LO f^ vC (\j iT r- r^ 0- -« IT * vC iT 

r^vcat^r-irca<vCTxrv. 

-Clot"- -C >C •-' 3^ (NJ CM »H X S' 



ono^ J1 * Od-f^ vDI^ PO XfO 

^iTvc -ex rr foo ^— r-xC 



. ^(VfOCCVtTX 



a. o r^ ^ X f^ >Of^ r- -^vcu^ o 

Ul ^ a "O ^ (MO^UI K) W1K1 vO IT 



r-3-CMocd- 



«^ gviT) 3- ^ 3'-» vCvOOViiD vC 



X'^— <rr-x X3-r- 



zr- oa-cj^n X -o^o^/^ -^3■^- 
r :j irr-cv c ^ If ^f<~r- cvc 
"D ji CO o (7< * XI J^r^ a^ 3- 3 
c j^ — o cr '^ f\j o^ 1^ a c fo 

(VJ 00^ J^ r- 3- lO 3- O fO fO (VJ 



~-x-H(\jr>-t\jf*-c 



. ■oxfi>r)o-o^(0 

»H ^ (\j K5 r^ c\i (fifvj X vC vC J" 
(rxp^r-vDcvj-Hroa^cjcM^ 



>- -H 3- -0 J1 X J^ J^ o Ki c\j ro -« 
« vCifi If) cr KTO X r>~ X r- o- c 



>- ji if> 3- 3- j^ f\j -o <v X (^ ^0 cr 

d ro iT 00 o r»- 3- (\i f^ r^ r^ lO If) 

Sif) X(V X^tOiO — xt\,c 3- 

a ruX IT f\J X K5 a ^^X (O -N 

0^ r-o^ (J> r- f^ -^ to -HCT* 3- tfi 



a: -^ xi^ cvj X f) o j> o -< r- 3- 
ao3-xf\jocrxo'C-<'H3- 
< 3- r—o o n (\j <\j c\j T X o o 



«r-irr»-r^<r if)c (\. c fvjo 



_i xo-^c\j3-xoc\,'xa>xox 
i-> <K)^x3-ir(\j3-r^o-Hxc 

X K-.x.r-K-,r-a<vcxfVf^.c 

Xt^X-<XX'\iXXf)XX) 



(T'HCTvx oif) XCT> xi-r^a^r^ 



iB»^ o^xif)r^r-XTXoxc>o 



_J XXO^XJ-XXfOlPf^XXXI 



r* DXr«-x-'oor^Tc\jf^-<o 



kf ZCXXXTXX.'OXCV.iT-" 

dirr^iraroxcvcxr^*"— 
_i -> X X J^r- -M*) xf) X o-i* 



r*- <ii(r a-o-xxfocrcrxoofsj 
V ajx-^c-Kio^oo^xira^^ 
»^>-u.Xif)-<3-iou3-r>- xxJif^ 
o_j X xiocrxj-^-xocvtr-o 
vj xr^vOXc\jr^ox)»H-<-<f\i 



< «i J' xcr = cvfoo- IT 3- a * o 

UJTX3-XiO!7»XX-<0--^ -^ 



3:xr-x?>o-«<vj'0*x)0f^ 

«a XXX Xf*-^-'^'^'^'^!^'^ 
Lj ON tj< jN a> a> o (7^ 7^ a* 7> j^ j> 



u. a: X t*-x (J> o -^<M i^* ••/^•o ^• 
4 X XX xr-r^r^ r"f^r^f*-^ 



A-24 



o <o o ;t r^ CM ^(O r- r^ c -^ 
» 3^ «\<ir ^ r- >£ m X »o K) «c 



i^ommr^ cyo 



>c«\,-<(r<v 

Cv£i»t^^C>CC- 

i CT 3^ 3 — >£ X t^ Kl a a a vO 
<V. CW 4^ -H »0 <VJ v£ ^ t^ iT >0 lO 









o •J xr» o-^ X ^ ^ <\( o oa> 



oovCiDCu >o ir^ira^ojir-a- 



Q. Ku- lor^ iT) »H lO ^r* ff^ iT) J- 

L. lOeC a OC 3^ IT IT X IT <r 3- <v 



■^ IDC X rr h- IT X a * 

"I <\) c ip in cvjiT X X X Ki o 
_ ra-r^r^fvjx 



_jo~coirr^O'<c*crxxo' fO 

D a: iT a f^ ^r^ 3- iTtc c ^ :*■ 

T rvj o fO -< cvjiT K1 -<r^ ^ ^ <\j 

a— cxcr— — xiTf^or^ 

IT 3- rO K^ If) K) X * X « ifi r^ 



Z C^ <) K) G J^ Jl K) (\J<^ S ^ J' 

3— d-cxroirc^ecccd-a 

"5 r- r~ ro I lo j> X c^ 3- (\jr>- r^ 

r- r~ X CM f^ o f^ r> r>- (C 3 X 

lo 3- iT) 3- fo r- 3- 3- J' r' .n d- 



>- r^ 0^ oj fo o CM> a> X) o X 3- 

< X K) CV (7* ^ a X <\j JV CT> <C IT 

SIiTrr (\X3^XXCN.XX 

a'X'HX<\jaix<\i'Oor^-< 

fO fO X ID 3- (\1 lO X JTf^ ® CO 



"-• XXXr«-(7>'00 3C7>OX3^X) 

z <(j>(\j-oir)o\jx-txoTi^io 

iLi ir)ocr^xxjixxo3X 

c K^ro^-ifvjfocvjiDr-irfviirx 



3X(MC^3r> 



T CM (\J X "O -O 3- .n 3 <\J f\J X 



33 0XiOOX^-'OXr^-»IlO 

iL.'Xi^frir3-r^oxcuo<ir»^ 
o.f^f'icv 3'<^33J^(\foox 

-^XX3J^iOOX'^ir)3-X 



J- C OC3fOlD-<3- 
0(VJ3-fO »0 3-3-3-XlO!00* 



C33<vx X ^o^i-iincxir 

«a^r^X3 IT) ^^<ror>- X'^ 
3cirx 3-cxirinrxfo 
oj<\.33- 'Oir-<«3 3-ir)r^x 



_JG^3-X fOOJX^OXf^X 
^IT^TCM K) ^^XCT'^CMO^lf) 

"5Xf\ix-< ox-^fyxr>-oLn 
xccrir. X cr-cMXCMTX 
ir)3rvj»o ir)ioir3-ir)r^3-x 



rcr-ma K5(rxcirirco 

"jv-M.-xxs r»- -Hroiriroiri-Hcvj 

xr-r^f^ 3--«a>aaioao 

00(03-'0 iOh.3^3-3^<0ifiin 



>-3-<3-^ XXOOOCM'HX 

<r^irxa 3-<\jxcvj'Hcrf^.^ 

5<\3-^3 X) (\J-XXXCv,3- 

r^oj-^m ^ X X fi CT> CT> 'HID 

CVJiOJIiT) 3 C\J>OX3-lOr-X 



-• 3:(\jjToc\j -o 3X3 or» XX 

»- Q.-'h-X3 I0{\|^0 3-(VJCJ>X 
ZTKX-OrXNi 3^ -^r^fVJ-HCMXX) 

ujuj jiTfl3> >f)a^ -1X3- io^»n 

0~ 3-f'5f\.<V 3 <V 1/1X3^0*3^ X 



2c«io3irir »-aot^K5o<vj<M 
zt- f^— irif «ax3Xif 3-(y 



■o-nr\jx iO(03-x3-cvi'or* 

1^3 

r^ iXfOfOx j< r- ox)fo>ooo« 
V u.'cr^(v— o oirairoxo 

' ~ - t T <\X;3X'H ' ' 



-JTOOO 3r^OXC\J-<. 

< Otoioc\j^oxr)(r<\i3^o 

Z fMi')rvjK13-K)rt(OU13T^3 



ir.^^x'Oii x(^(M<r xs'^HO 

«<IC'^C3 X 3 3CX-<lOX 

ui"30XX53 X)vJ>O-0f^r»-(0X 

yj 30r'0 3- iOir3-XX(T>3 

iO'OCU3 U13-<MirO^X-^X 



oa: or«-»!7>o»Hfvj(03;r)or«- 
< X X X X r«- r- r~ r~ h- f»- r^ r^ 

Lj CJ< (JN j\ (7« CT> 0^ (3^ CT> (7> O* 0» CT> 



«x X X X r- r^i^r-f^r-f-r- 



A-25 



c>m»o « c O' in iT* •» O' *< rt o 

■ — ~- -"Ovca-cvjin^ifi 



uj <\j CM o a cr f^ "O <vj f^ <o (O o 

(\j ma; »r^ iT r~ :» vO vD f^ r~ 
3^ lO K5 IT. 3- r^ >C IT 3^ »c <c r^ 



Ccoii.c<v.ttcv3a<ta.a 

Z 3 3or^ J" « ec — ex v£a 
a O" 1^- c If ^ lo f^ r^ r^ ff f^ 

CMOja- tOfOvO vC >C 3 3 ITCC 



>xc\;c>caccc 



If iro^ iTc X a <vj c c (N. 3 
Kim3^K)3 Xvcr^inTvca 



Olf)X3CrXO^ vO<M<VJCT>XvD 

xr~ o^x ir<\j vcc ff-o K)(\. 

lO «M lO 3- lf> vC r>- X lO X) o ff> 



Q. 3-tOvO 3CT* 3 X<\i 3X lO-C 

iij ^iT o \0 c ^ r^ '^^■ <^' * f^ 

V/l 3 3- a- Of^ CC Cr 3 <V O OCT 
3- If) vC 3 vO >£ r^ vC iT X X >c 
3-IO 3- K) K) vO Xf^ 3- >0 mCT' 



OITlvOX O'^IT 3 CNJlflX 10 3 

— -7<\)xa~oo~x 



Oior^ 3- ;rf^ (J> 'C -^ <vjr"0 vO 
lO o CO -*c cj >o '^ o> o r) <M 
3-K)3'irif)\or- xioif)oo> 



Q.^^xOor-vOvCXCMiT'^r^o 

uj cvj r- <vj o^ c r^ X >c «-! c X »o 

i/iiT >£ ojt^ fvj lO r^ cv) r- vo o X 

3- iT r^ »o>o 3 m »- ^ cvj fo r^ 

3- K> 3^ (OfO >ox r>- 3- >oir X 

oirr^ loxa IT (\j c c <Mxr^ 
o ^r^irr-3 3 X X cv. or-cr 

< 3 ^rOiflO^ If) OCT^ Cif>'00> 
^^Xf^XX3^0~X0'(y 

if)ioKi 3CVJXX oio 3ircr 



_ja> 3- vOtfi <vj ifi 'OO' oo> X o 
DKima^ lo^-sc ax c mxm 



^xr^ir3-ox 



_j »H o to Cf>- <M o> o r^ >c >o ro 

3xar^<v3-xxcv«r--H3- 

-3<oifi tr ofO X 310 cvia cNjo* 

X a X (j'3- X \C -^cr tOX <M 

lO rO lO fOfO >0 1^ r~ 3- 3- C3^ X 



— If r>-3Xif f^ 



X JTO 3 3 r~XO>Dif>l^ 1^ 



Olf) \Din'')lf) XX vC 3^ X J> 



T c X 3^ X X ^ CNJ o ii r^ fy 3- 

X03X3XC3'OXvDr~ 

if>3'<\iioiOinr^ Xif) 3'>o>o 



>-X)oif)Oif)crr^oc\ja^oJi 
< a X a X m a ovi -^ f^ •-' cv >o 

(vjxojcoa 'Cif)<-'r^ai') 
vOi03 3'0 3-r~r>->0foxx 



ar^xooinin^oooinxcT* 



33i0 3T0if)r^<rifixirx 



trinxmcrxx xxr^r- X'-i 
«tf^^^»cxxu"ar^3a>f^ 

SXX^XJ^T3X'Or^C\)J^ 

xx.3(\ -"^^ """^ 



X'^ JOio-nnsfirTOioox 

r-«iX03i')^a'OX(\l03 3' 
jj 2 O 'H 3 -<r~ 7> ■O r- X X O <7> 

I- iroxxfviXif 3a(\iO' 1^ 
/I 33P03(03r-fM3-'Oincr 



p- [E»O-<rr)^C0m3'Oif)X'Or- 

■V. Lj3Ki>c»^<\j<\!oxr-«-<r^»o 
-1 u.xxr-=x-ocvjr-(\jxoo 
oi/i (oxxmifoxcroxaf*; 
vuj 3-(\j<\j'0-H(vjiotr3^'<5ifi;n 



i/izcr o cfvi 3 X -Hio OKI cvT 

SLrxaxir»-toirxoxm 

j-jr-r- x-nr- X f\jxf)^-«x 

< OXaoirtOOO'03'03 
2 (O^-H3<V<'OXr^'OP0'O>C 



r^ <cnxx)Xc\J3xr-rt<NjacM'0 
N. ujcojKiirio3-x— r-cjinm 
^ vu.3^X3X)'-xf!foa^r«xo 
o _i xr^xi^3xar-ioif)or- 

X _| inr0i0 3C\Jf0if)Xlf)3-f^>0 



l/lZOT^lf XmXfO Clf) XX 3 

<<tMar^xc^oc^JK^loa^Ol^ 

UJ"3 X-H'^03f)i7^il-^ J*"^^ 
Lft 3'tM<VO;r3-aXa>X3r- 

in roio .oio 3- r- cr * «if) o 



o:rxr-x J>o 'Hrvj'03- lfl^o^- 
< XX X Xf^r^ t^'^'^'^'^f* 
u cjs (7^ CT- tr cr 3^ (T> ^ o* 3^ tJ^ ^ 



u. i>o^-x o*o»^<M'03- l^^o^- 



A-26 



tjtfiioioioKi^for*- ;r 






noinofoa-a- 



«->>0 >0(^ (VKVJ Olf> r^ If) 0<M fS( 
UJlT (VJ* X CT- 3^ (Vl O 00 ^C (\| 

cc> X <\j a^ oc r^ If) o ^ f^ (\j CD 
* ^ <\j vo to r- * X <o>ox f^ 



cor^ifr«coc<Mfirv£ifa 

Z a c X ir u^»n 3- c ir J- crin 
If X a- >C IT v£ o <£ r, ir 3 >c 



>o> vCf^a«cvoca*r^<cro 

zr- cc ^ or^ X Xf^ cr- .a- 
3- ira^ vc a^ X ^ X If >£ f^ a 



f- CVJ O If) -< O ^ O CNJ -^f^ vC O 

o^r<^r-r- a^vC ino ar^ a -H 

o o^ 0^ ^ CT> r^ 3- ifi f^ ro 3- X a< 

a IT. <\i r~- sc '^ o c r- vo IT IT 



OX iTd- X ^ " ^ f^ OJ X 3- CU 



i/)if> iTto xr- fvjif) 3-r^ 'H 
cvj IT >c r^ lo X c 1^ f^ vO r- X 



c » ^<v X coj 3- <v. c — r^ If) 

< CT> X vC iT ^fO rO ^ X (T 3- C7^ 



e 3- r>-vc f^ irif) 3- »o a cvi<\j X 

Z)o iTj' X 3 -<c cvjrof^rr 3^ 



_J03-(\)3^lf)lf) im^ ^— lOX 
r lOt^ C IT 3^ C C IT K) ^3- Cy 

"3 >0 ^^ X <\l C ^0 O (\J "I O^ .H (7> 



_iio o<\j oif) <M ^ r- f*i cvjcvi ff* 
o r- ira X o o rt <\j K) r- cvj m 

"3 X X*0 (\J (\J vO 3- (\J -H vD to -H 

fT *x if.r- OX oc irf^«c 



"3irc\i x'Or*-^ 3T^ oc^ * o 



ZXlfl'^inX3-X 3-»OXtO.-i 

^fo fox>ccccr x<\jcvCvc 
") >I3 ^t>- 3^ Co in o r^ vD cr r- vO 

3- 3-1^ (^ 3- 3- -< lOf^ lOX to 



>-Bio>nc\ixr- 3^c\jLnM-^£\j 

<irrOCMflXirxo3-0'3-0 

5 X -- -" iT r^f^ ifMTir c r- 1 
ipr^^xcrir'Hr^ O"xx»o 



>-o^ X c\if)f>- -<x ooa< ^-H 

< OJ OOO O 3- O" ^ X rO lf)fO lO 

5Xca^crxcfor^X3X^ 

3- X3^ X r- 3- (y 3- f^ 3- X -^ 



a: (\j lo ^ 3- <\j vf) (O -^ -H X f*- X 
Q.o»^X'oxorooor^ir3- 

<(J^3-3-X'H-^<\j(7< 3-X-^CVJ 
X3- lOX 3-C\J Ot^ CVia <^J3■ 
•-' — < ^ »H CNJ (VJ <VJ (\J -^ (VJ CO 

a: ifo X J> a* 3- X -H ro in X if) 

<io-H<yro3r-xcoaxxo 

z -or*. 3- 'H 3--I -o or- f) X ji 

a ro X X r- -^ a 3- X 3^ X c 



UJXrOXfVjXX iTCr <\J— XO 

ll X) T ct*- ro.-^ r^ cr xa> f>-r» 
n ^oirf0^3-coxf0 3<MfO 



*-• Q:xx-^cviiocox3-^-a>cvj j> 
ID Q.rvifoxxf^ifir-toioxc^'H 

UJ l/l < X -^O C\J <M eg <VJ (7^ 3- 0^ if^ -^ 

(Tuj r-in3-(^3--HXioxinr-(r 



aJS'OC7>3- XC7^lO-4C0r-XCyX 

K xcoirxuiax k:x3-p-o 

HCVJ-«^-«fVJ 



r-Q 

»*• <IC0f»-3-XCMO-Hj13-iOX-< 

V ujo-t3-r-x<\jxxocoo^ir 
^ >-u.3if)f^ xr-xir^r-ioiox 
o _j ir3^r«-3-xx<\iXor-x 



trz-H«c3-3-x-noxxcr-H 
^xa'^iT-^vj a-^irc-'3 

J"3r«- -H X (J> -<X O 3- f> -MCT^ if) 
< fVIC\l3^3-Cv|i0fViOr>-C0r0 3 



IT. zr* (\(o(7> 3im c\;ioxx X 
<<(y(yxxxxr'Oor^<vtn 



OXXr^X!7>O'H<Mr0 3-lf) or^ 



J. QC X r>-0 3^ O .^CM >0 3- If) X P- 



A-27 



O Of^ O K) vO Of^ vO J' COlO * 



3- * ITir ID >«^ ec o^ CT- c -^ <\j ♦ 



rO vO 0^ iT O^ C\j ^ O^ O^ • 



zh-<rj^ £-aaiirnr-— <t«fn 






ucr^ca-cr^ 



1 vO o iT) c\j o a cvj >o (\j 



OiT) 1^ vDr-<Dioo^x^omr^(v»o^o 









t£ IT X a IT. 1^ K) eg C t\. 05 -H <\j >£ <\J 

< ^ iT) iT rO ^ ID O CD CC r- vC (T a; (T" 
O- <\J\C X K5 vO <Vj v£ 3- K50 * CD <Vi 



cm CT>-<cr-%cccr-ioa-cr*ccr 

«a3 cvj -<xr^(^cxx^03■l^l^)^- 
a lor-xiDj^iDr^iTj-'-'iraK) 



"3 X rO -I rr (VJ fO ,0 OjrO iT d- -^ fVi X 

cjroroto* a-iTiTvor^c xxa 



Q -jx :t '£r--xa^Kioo\f)va^xr" 



-3 ^ CO 3- in X 3- = -^a> o^ J- <\j vB -c 
o K)r- (T — in Ki -HIT o '^r^ f^ 0" 

fOlOK)»03- 3-in>Ov0r«-XCCK7*O> 



< -jr«- -or^xcT ^xX'^o'Ocvjin* 



r X X C r<1 -£ X C X a- K5 C 0^ 



>-cg x'Oc^^•^-x<^JC^c^JlOvO»^ln 
<nn a-:»xcy'ro.-i-<>ox(TiOvO>o 

a <vj xr>'»H(rojr^^'HOfOinCT> 
<\j lo Kiro ^ 3- in m vo r^ « <o « o* 



i^ocr^xiTo— . 

«t X(T o o-^!7>vO X J- cMsmn * d- 
h-wvc xocnxf^cr Xino^tTfO 
<vio to K-, :»• ^ 3^ mm vcr- r» X (T 



r vrj^xoo3-<M<Mor^*om 
n c\jr^ov0\0O(j^r-m.*cra*-^ 

\J n ^DXOlOK)-^o*-^'Of^O 
CM XX'^r-OOC\J'^<T''0'0X 

\j Kiioto3-*mvOvcr-r-«CT>cr 



X a m f^ CT :» a m. cv a If . a r^ X 
cvjrvifO »0"0 ^ * m xxr^ ««o» 



< 1= ocvjxncMor-iomoxojO' 
H c«ir>- oxmmToxfMKiioinm-^ 
jJUJsrNJ X) J^a> x-«fO(\jmf«-cj>org« 
cr »- a om.r-cm.of^iooxd-ar- 



r* smoo'OxoxoX'H.a^omm 
V uj— 3-xc»rx»o^-H<\ixcroffl 
•H u.iO'or-a>irx'Oiom(\jmox(\j 
oui mf^o^-^xxKixfvjomojxm 
viiJ <\j<\jcgfOK)toa^*mxxr>-r-x 



- <i^ r^ m*ofO(M(\jxr»^ooo 
V lijic r^ — axrgxm.a-O'Hin^o 
H >-u.r> = j"0:t3-n^'0'Oiomr^* 
3 _/ (7> cM^r~c\jmox-^oX'Ox® 
v_i fvj >or0(0 3-d-mm»of^^-xffl0> 



crzmaxd-^a^mo'-ooj^o^x 
«— 03^ cr-'.-x x^fvjtrr^O'X 

< xr^(r-<3-(T'*x<\)a>x<Mr'm 
2 <vj<vjcvjfOKii03^*mm<or«-r»«) 



trzc cx = Xd-c(7>f~x<vj*-«c 



< X £) £ XX xr-(^f^f»-r-f>-f^r^ 






A-28 












0«^>0<V)*-3''0<Ot*- >0<T'>^ 



> « >c <r in <\j vC <vj<v <v<vj »«7- 

2 X J^ iT. C iT X (V." fV-f^ ^ '^ 

CD IOC ^i^c X— <cr^r>-»n 
i<^ ^ vT-iT inr- r- c cyior- c 



Q.crknccocua)*na-x O"^ 
it;irx<\.cir<r — — cc <vi o 

r^<cio— <h-K-,cir<\jo IT '^ 
lOioa-iTirxf-C'^io >c 3* 



{J cxioax^o- ar^ioo 



I — ccva-irp^xoojp^—tcm 

<xioc^f^xxt\jr^cjxcNj 

z crc\jxoxd-i^Af!^<oirio 

►-< iod-d-.oirxr-c<vi'nxcr 



O XCXI'".0' (VJCTX iTXfMtt 

«j K)d-3-if)irxvDCT>iod'ir«; 



1-1 zr-OkTcocM^ovjJ^aT- 3- o 
1/1 -cj'tvaxj^xcMOCT' in lo 



>-r-xxr'0«xc\jAJXJ^ iD in 
<K)a<rmxr<";X<Txx lOh- 

r-oxcf-xioxo* r^ o^ 

lOd-a-JllTXP^J^OjrO d-t^ 



3:a>o<\joffl xa^Dooj "O cm 



3 K5 a lo d^ IT <vj r~ ^ r- c lOvO 

"3 <\j c t\jm X lO o-^ X ^ f^ CT> 
(T oj lOo r^ iT xa> a- cr ^iT 
rOd-3-Lf)if)Xr~<o oioxeo 



Z >.(Mr^O> J-XiDiO J OiOiO* 

< <xd-d-4txa-ox^r^*CNJ 

5 5 err CO^ cr^CVjX XwlTilO 

uj r^oxax^-^i^r^^xfM 



'-,;*d-irxxx'-* xr*- 



^ ^t*- "^ ^ O CM "H ^ -^IT) <0 <M 
1/1 CLrOXlTO^XJ-l/VOCMr^'^X 

■-< UJ r^f^iocro^cvixr-cMoi^o 
(E »-t KlrO^d-irXX®''*'-^^- 



^ XJTOO^^ ^J'Oi'^-O X X 



^ Xoa*CT>JlXCT''ntO«»HXCT» 
Z C<l^X0'X<MC\JCMirXOO<M 

4 uzJ^'M-or^o^'O x^7>*:n 



j.rv.xocvcrx^i-wJ' X -H 



>»j K)md-ininxx<D'<'omr«- 



/)2^XXC\)<\|lOX-^C\.r » 

<xx^c--f^^— --CM e 

J-)T AJ'-^M^JOD'OOJ^ a 



UJCT>CJ*0^(J^0^J*<7>tJ*3*0^ 



IT zr^-io x<Mi/ir^ CM3- (OX x« 
<<c^x*ooxxxiro(?> 

UJ "3 !M -H CJ* "NJ iTtr*- 'H 3- CM -^ * !7> 

m^^^iOiDXffloio^x 



ii. X X ^-lOCT> 3 -^(Mio* lflx^- 
< X X X x^-r^f^i^ f*'^^"^ 

Ij J\ OS CT^^ (7> 5» CT>0> CT> O* 0* <3* 



A-29 






lO^lTUICT' 



otNiio J- r^ o 3^ S' cr <\j «d- (j^ vO o 
o^ c « CT" o '^ <vi IT a: .^ir) J> c\j a- 



ZLf^XiO^O C <\i»f^»-' 3^ OjlO 



zr- X tc a c « f\j a^r- -<3- a cv 3- 



>-o(r^o^>£ 



-<tioa3»no^-Hic 



«_)p>JOvor-->oo*ir>cc3- (T ^-o 



OC*-c0*CT>O'H 



j^r>-o3^tDf\jd- 



-i^^ojcvjcvjroiD 



a>c<x)(7*c\j»^ r- ro-^io-H jvC(\ja> 



It— 'Cd-lTiT 



1 M^'^^OjtV 






~3r^r^<x;cro • 



xo*'<ior-vX3CM>ofvjo vor- vO-^o 



p,rt-^cj{\.cvjK;io 



m O" (C cr^ o a^ r- evjin 



~j(^r-xc^o . 



■H^vCO^for^^fO 






2 5 if^xa^c -H »^po>ca(r>r>-cK5 



_i >-<\j;nir)<oo.oc\jvOa3-t'^3Jr^(V 
11 <al^3•(\K^Jo^^^co^coc^Jecm 






•-• Q.xiDKi^oomuicr'Oor^^io 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ,<CVJ CVJ (O K) 



r^T<\)'^iD<0*<\ 



- »- — ^— cv(Cv.mf) 



z c<vOirioo<rc3-a-r-xirec«vj-< 



V uj>D*<vja=D cr (^J'<3•>c<^J^^<^J<^ 
-^ U.X)r^XXJ" O -^KIJIX-HiTOfV) 
OKI '^ ^^^^eMCVIfOK) 






H >-U. Xl^ X XO^ 0-"0 J1 X«H £) O^ 



^^^<\(<\jiOlO 



j-j^r-c-oj^ o -»<\»jis-Hi/ij»c\j 



U1ZCV)OX);»-'irX-H 






u. X * ifi >o f^ « <J* o '^<>' "^ ■* i'* ■O f^ 



A- 30 



ujo 3- vo 3- o (^ ^ K>>o iT a cr <r a 



>*(Toeoa'cc^ 



5irxoo<oi^ 



I— »f> ^iOCT> '^ <rr^ iD»H o^ >£i sC (D lO 

OlD 3- ec >0 »0 CC CM 0^ IT .J- CiT D O 

o (\i lo K) J- vT) ji vc r- (j> cr a (T cr -H 

a cvj o^ J- ro -^cr 3- 3^ o ji o in o CT> 
ujK) K5r->ccj>o ^ ff r* oec i*ivO o* 
i/iK) K)f*i ^in in a r^ cc o^ a; o^ o ^ 

OC r» >C Kl 3- * 00 lO (VJ CC >C <\- If) »< 

~ ^ ^r^ crx vc c fT rr k^cc -'r^ * 

< (vj Ki ro fo 3- in X r- CO X I cr o> -H 

_i d- >£ CT vo CM f\j r- in a in iD oo ^o X 

Z! lO l<0 CT K) C 3^ xC (VJ C IT Cki vC rr 3- 

"J cvitom 3- vo X X xcr C7> oc7> o ^ 

zo^ rtioo^cr =0 3^ 0^ CO (or- lo >of^ 
V) z:ir(CK)a\Ci^vc<\ju"ircca:(r 
z -3<Mio3-'OinvO>acoir j^oooo 

O »i<^-^»^-H«^«««CslfVICVjC\l 

-I 

Z va>»^0»3^^.0vC3-r-3-.0CV3-» 

<a'or«icat^in>-if^cro>oK5o 
z i--Kii03-3x;xf^craa^ca-c 

1/1 

i/i 'xo3-a^>o^-<ocMcjr-.Hr-v0 3^3- 
o Q.crr^crcooi-oojKKcinj-'oa^ 

o 

Q 

Z 

< xo(oj>'^>C3-<o-^f«-c>jin<t)a*o» 
s <eor^— 3-*'<(rtoocrr'vDvoa3 

r^ •..........••• 

r^ ur* j\^crx(OJTOfOop»-!OK5in 
V uj>c>oocMCT'io-H3-o(ra'0'-^<M 

«H LL-hOM3K)3 JlXvOa3ca3®<J> o 

X 

i/i z <r a^ (7> CO 3- ^ o X r- (^ cvi r- 3^ r^ 

< \0 k; 3- p^ '^ f\j vC r^ iT r^ X IT r^ vO 

_l "J -• CM (O -O X) in ^ vO«^ (J< X) » 33 <J» 



o«n o^ in r^in o CM -H 3- o cvjr- 3^ CT> 
UJ3- f^« in-H iTnO mvo iT X B r>- ec 
OCMiotn 3^.c>oxt>-(rcra-cra o 

> c lOK) a * CM 3^ a cuf^ r- »^ K) 3- 
ctt3X3^c<vo3^i«-af>-aifa 
z cvj K> IT a vcxxi^ax era CO 

KvO-HfsjaoincMor- cvjh-f^ ^o^• 
c> IT 3- X .c vC X oj CT> 3- in '^r- ^ to 
ooM»ni^3-inin^of^CT>ff>(7>cr o^ 

a. -H OT"- ^O O <0 "HO^ vO vO CM >o -^ 

ii,Kijot^r-trxir-«x CMa3-ira> 

iTKi irio 3-ir mx XX O" xcr o^ 

ii:vcoinxir^xcrK5cur^>c^«c 

31^ 3- C <\jO -^inxac 3-vO CMX 

«vj ID 3- 3- in vo »£i r^ X cr cr cr o ^ 

_iin foa (j^ f^ f\j vc K5 CM -< in CM cMin 
D <\j tvj r^ o\C c f\j X r- oj a 3^ '^ CM 

"3 CO K) lo 3- in >o vC r- X (7> cj> (?> o "H 

^^^^^^^^^^^^CMfVJ 

zrMfOOM'^xc7>xinx<\iin(T>«vO 
i/> ::c3^o-vO<\jacM<r<vjcjr^>c3^ir 
z "3<vj<)roiDininv£f^x<7>cr<J>oo 

O «^^^^«^^^^^^CMCM 



>-sOa*r~-^io»^cM»Hiooox»^o 
<-^ ^incvjox tnomf^xCT" 3- CM 
5 CM K) rr 3^ in iT X r- cr C7> cr a tj" c 



l/l XOCMvO'^'HCMCM^XO^'OOiO 
O Q-CrXOCT'^XlO-HOrOCT^r^vDOJ 



3 -Oin vO Xr^ X OCT>(J^ 3> 3* 



ztn 

< Q:'0(7>o-HrO<\J3-3-(J*.na^'HvOX 

2 c<— oxaor^^o^xinirtoioin 

liJ UJSCM'OiO'OJI JIXXXC^CTT 0-< 

1/1 

-J 
r»-a 

r» <X £!<T3-^CMr-»^CT>OCMCMO>'^0 

V LijxxcMir(v)m»DircMin<MCMinr^ 
-H >-u. -H CO 3- n^ ji X X X o J> c^ o^ o 

o_i CVi «>. 

4 
Z 
o 

irZ-H'^rOC7*3-X 3inf>- (T>03•lO^• 
«(7> Xr» (T * iT O" -hO^ <\j 3-0 in IT 

uo -^ CM ro (O in ji Ji f>- r^ o j^ cj» a* o 



o QC 3^ ln^o r» X !j> o ^^c\i JO 3- in xO r- 



NO. A-31 



OEP«RT«CNT OF DEFENSE 
IKE CCNTB4CT ^MtROS BY ST«TE 
MET »»IUE OFHILITARr PROCUREHENT »CTIOHS BY 0EP«RT1EW 
FISCAL YEAR 1977 
(AHOUNTS IN THOUSANDS) 















STATE 


TOTAL 1/ 




NAVY 


AIR FORCE 


DEFENSE 

LOGISTICS 

AGENCY 


AHCUNT FERCENT 




TOTAl, U.S. £/ 


152,751,721 
7,212,18<. 


lll,2'.7,262 


«17,330,32i. 


317,202,829 
2,252,1.1,6 


3 5,751,316 


NOT OIST«ieoTEO BY STATE £/ 


1,937,610 


1,670,635 


l,26f,2*3 


STATE TOTALS £/ 


*S,53e,S37 100.0 


9,309,652 


15,659,689 


li>,950,383 


*,*85,073 


ALABAMl 


*21.217 0.9 


179,983 


33,921 


77,771. 


127,3*0 


AUSf* 


123.086 0.3 


*.<.,261 


16.469 


22,1.03 


23,389 


ARIZONA 


51.0, 2CZ 1.2 


139,351 




23*, 51.9 


7,739 


ARKANSAS 


70,505 0.2 


22,273 


»,'210 


17,863 


25,956 


tALIfORNIA 


10,070,100 22.1 


1,382,960 


3,059,763 


3,077.kl3 


756,3*5 


tOLORAOn 


370,169 0.0 


6»..<.51 


38,178 


225,760 


20.132 


rCKNECTICuT 


1,971.. 323 «..! 


236, 51A 


791,571 


090,7*1 


53.80* 


CELAkARE 


50,Efe2 0.1 


7,21.1 


3.751. 


9,633 


29.928 


OlStllCI OF COLUNPI* 


697.51.0 1.5 


1.2,782 


<.90,0i.C 


*l,50b 


69.79* 


FLORIDA 


l,060,f77 2.S 


278,6<.5 


253,698 


*39,900 




CECRCIA 


517,688 1.1 


171,051. 


*0,779 


2*5,919 


58.505 


fAKAII 


223.605 0.5 


A6,385 


77,298 


21,003 


71,2*2 


IDAHO 


15,525 • 


TO". 




5,05* 


9,653 


ILLINOIS 


559. 93<. 1.2 


150,1.51. 


69,11.8 


118,01* 


212,973 


IKCIANA 


03*. 832 1.8 


<.2«,679 


103,207 


219,261 


02,1*3 


lOMA 


280,750 0.6 


76,91.8 


13,325 


76,5*7 


113,353 


»»KS«S 


363,265 0.8 


l«i.,132 


39,078 


1*0,253 


36,20* 


»ENTUC«Y 


221.<.61 0.5 


130,31.6 


9,599 


5,306 


76,068 


ICUISHNA 


390,651 0.9 


138,681. 


96,A03 


22,207 


133,187 


>MNE 


J23,276 0.7 


•.0,921 


269,531. 


6,099 


6,273 


"ASYLAND 


1,052,271 2.<. 


135,91' 


»62,926 


332,190 


90,19* 


rissACHusETis 


2,395.<.91 5.1 


565,559 


0O5r759 


060,7** 


12*, 738 


riCHlGiN 


1, 21.4., (.55 2.7 


957,767 


65,21.1 


119,177 


97,20* 


PIKNESOTA 


656,230 1.* 


170,353 


301,5<.& 


121,17* 


38,39* 


MISSISSIPPI 


*93,211 1.1 


25,080 


302,605 


25,*13 


59,1*8 


MSSCURI 


2,361,070 5.2 


227,296 


610.168 


1,*76,55* 


29,062 


fOKT«N/l 


173,731 a.k 


7,717 


23 


151,761 


1*,1** 




75,915 t.2 


35,900 






7,510 


t.EV«C» 


27,875 i.l 


1,023 


12,058 


13,217 


*30 




153,329 0.3 


%1,9A7 




13,815 


12,058 


NEM JERSEY 


1,216,613 2.7 


213.962 


A53,662 


257,965 


21*. 687 


t.EM HEXICO 


159,999 0.1. 


*6,958 


2.602 


73,137 


3*, 203 


•>EK VOMf 


«,S00.27l 9.1. 


227,053 


2,200,61.8 


1.090,182 


300,119 


kCRTH CAROLINA 


373,506 1.8 


mo, 171 


110,570 


37,*21 


•3,183 


I.PRTH DAKOTA 


A3, 533 e.l 


25,056 


360 


10.306 


7,726 


CHIO 


l,16<i,100 2.6 


288,322 


278, A** 


♦93,372 


101,562 


CKLAHONA 


292,796 t.6 


<.9,626 


A0,S26 


101,*S7 


93,027 


CREOCN 


77,91.5 0.2 


8,1.87 


S6,<>7(. 


13,01* 


10,603 


fekn;ylw«ni« 


l,65»,009 3.6 


629,251 


637,711 


170,106 


190,759 


AHOOE ISLAND 


125,051 t.3 


16,908 


93,21.6 


1.5*2 


13,007 


«OUTH CAROLINA 


175, AlO O.S 


30,106 


72,619 


17,*56 


S*.b20 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


13,289 • 




1,133 


*,706 


2,009 


TENNESSEE 


f09,7l8 1.6 


1.80, A12 


17,967 


113,731 


97,297 


TEXAS 


2,778,375 6.1 


bl.7,852 


416,030 


1.2*3,001 


♦6*, 090 


LTAH 


226, 75<. 0.5 


1.2.133 


25,016 


11.1,099 


12,012 


VERBCNT 


119,108 0.3 


68,191 


9,505 


J9,989 


922 


VIRGINIA 


2,0IO,<.51 *.5 


292.391. 


1,«25,372 


131, *7* 


«0,0T2 


NASHINCTOS 


1,738, 1.52 3.0 


53,638 


%06,660 


1,003,98b 


107,5** 


l)E<T VIRGINIA 


91,795 0.2 


9,676 


«1,11.9 


6,50* 


3*, 2** 


kISCCNSiN 


*16,39<i 0.9 


133,653 


130,1,59 


•1,222 


90,701 


NYOHINC 


19.*29 • 


1,<>0A 


1,2<.3 


f,033 


13.05* 



i/ INCLUDES "OTHER MFENSE AGENCY" AUARSS NOT INCLUBEB ELSEWHERE IN THIS TABLf. 

• LESS THAN 0.05 PERCENT. 

FOR FOOTNOTES, SEE FACE A-35 . 



A-32 



P « I H t C N T • 

NET V»LUE OF Hi 
FlSCtt. 



N£KT OF OtFeN&E 

ACT 4MAK0S BY SfATc 
LITArT PHJCUkEMEMT MOTIONS IT FISCAL TEkR A/ 
TEARS 197S. 19^6 AND 1177 
HOUNTS IN THOUSANDS) 



















FISCAL YEAR 


975 


FISCAL YEAR 


1976 


FISCAL YE* 


R 1977 


SIATE 


ANCUNT 


•ERCEST 


AMOUNT 


PE8CENT 


AMOUNT 


PcRlLNT 


TOT«U. U.S. 6/ 


•*3.355,*71 




»**,678,867 
5,729,592 




$52,751,721 
7.212,16* 




NOT OISTfiieuTEO 9T ST4T£ C/ 


6.036,0*2 




St»T£ TOTALS 0/ 


S7,319.*29 


180. il 


38,9*9,275 


ItfO.O 


*5. 539.537 


100. o 




















ALAe«xA 


*16.596 


l.l 


*1»,2*9 


1.1 


*21.217 


0.9 


ALASKA 


tJl.Al* 




1**,75* 




123, JSb 




ARIZONA 


667,r«.5 




61*, 288 




5*0, ^C2 




AhKANSAS 


<>>.l'i9 




77,176 




7U.5Q5 


0.2 


CALIFORNIA 


r,907.97r 


21.2 


8,9*9,118 


23.0 


10,07«.1«L 


22.1 


COLORADO 


29J,S03 


8.8 


311,33* 


8.6 


379.169 


ii.8 


CONNtCTICUT 


2,34.8.567 


6.3 


1,913.089 




l.97*.J23 


*!3 


CtLAHiPE 


se.aiz 




36.565 




6fl.ob2 




DISTRICT OF iOLUMei* 


526.723 


1.* 


*ll,5*l 


l.l 


697. S»S 




FLOSIOA 


1,130,015 




972,001 


2.5 


l,06i,,«77 


2.3 


ttORGIJ 
H-KAIl 


630.005 
29»,bfll 


0.*8 


*76,917 


1.2 

8.9 


517.686 
223. 6u5 


1:1 


lO.HO 
ILLIKOIS 


io.ia« 

*93.96* 


1.3 


16,528 
*7*.328 


1.2 


15.525 
559.93* 


1.2 


INDIANA 


•11,702 


2. 2 


785,230 


2.1 


83*. 632 




lOMA 


17«.,9S9 


0.5 


229,966 


8.6 


28U.751) 


».6 


IC.NSAS 


90I..566 




307,338 


8.8 


363.265 


a'.» 


KENTUCKJf 


lfcb,756 


«.* 


188.266 


8.5 


22l.>,oi. 


fl.5 


LOUISIANA 
► AINE 

HARTtANO 


4.77, ".ez 
55,511 

• 02,25*. 


1.3 

• .1 


302,719 
283,758 

981,623 


8.8 

8.7 

2.5 


390.651 
323,^76 

1,092.273 


0.9 
8.7 

2.* 


f«SSACMUSETTS 


l,770.2a^ 




1,956,1*5 


5.0 


2,395, *91 


5.3 


rICKICAN 


766,063 


2.1 


965,168 


2.5 


1,2**, *58 


2.7 


MNNESOTA 


«37.566 


1.2 


698,533 




65b.,:30 




riSSlSSIPPI 


972,^^1 


2.6 


U*.615 


2.* 


*93.21l 


1.1 


msioufli 


1,361. •.•9 


3.6 


2.29*. 789 


S.9 


2.361.i7u 


5.2 


(MONTANA 


5,100- 




22.839 


8.1 


173.731 


0.* 


NtPRASKA 


«9.06e 


1.1 


*3,66* 




79.915 


£.2 


NEVAOI 


«<.,875 




19,827 




27.875 




NEN HArPSHIRt 


10(.9S« 


C.5 


1*7,**1 


• .« 


153, J29 


a'.i 


NEN JERSEY 


990.929 


2.7 


975.325 


2.5 


1,216,613 


2.7 


KC« tiEXICO 


93,612 


8.3 


12*, 9*1 


8.3 


159.999 


8.* 


KEW YORK 


3,7*3,91.2 


18.8 


J, 18*, 122 


8.5 


*.30«,271 


9.* 


NORTH CAROLINA 


396.752 




3*6,968 


t;9 


473,51.6 


8.8 


NORTH DAKOTA 


175,671 


o'.s 


15*, 566 




*3,533 


0.1 


OHIO 


1,013, 062 


2.7 


921, 89« 


2.* 


1. 16*.li.,j 


2.6 


OKLAHOHA 


215,329 




25*. 878 


8.7 


292,796 




OREGON 


5<,«66 


8*2. 


51,733 




77,9*5 




PtNNSYLYANiA 


1,066,737 




1,252,*06 


3.2 


1.65*.iJ9 




RMOOE ISLAND 


73,525 


0.2 


9*,**2 


8.2 


125,051 


8.3 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


203. (00 


8.5 


156,715 


8.* 


175. Hl8 


8.* 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


18.667 


0.1 


1*,118 




13,289 




TENNESSEE 


359,5*0 


1.0 


3*1,750 


8.9 


709,718 




TEXAS 


2,023.7*6 


5.* 


Z.095.*38 


».* 


2.778,375 


6!l 


UTAH 


1*0,736 


0.* 


1*5,285 


8.* 


226.75* 


8.5 


»ERHONT 


122.962 


0.3 


129.23* 


8.3 


119. Id8 


0.3 


VIRGINIA 


1.206.616 


3.2 


1.607,658 




2,038.*51 


6.5 


WASHINGTON 


1,637.112 




1.289.258 


a'. I 


1,738,*52 


3.8 


NEST VIRGINIA 


73,888 


8.2 


85,339 


8.2 


91,7'<5 


6.2 


HISCONSIN 


236.79* 




250,922 


8.6 


616,39* 


6.9 


MYONINC 


28,968 


B.l 


28.912 


8.1 


19,*29 





IC CCNT««CT AMARCS PY STATE 
NET VALUE OF CIVIL FUNCTIONS PROCUSEHtNT ACTIONS ±.t ^f 



FISCAL Y 


EARS 197fc, 1975 A 


iC 1976. AND FISC 


AL YEARS 1976 AhC 1977 TO DATE 








ANOUNTS IN TMOUSANOSI 








FISCAL YtA8 

I97k 

JUL 7S-JUN 7<i 


FISCAL YEA« 

1975 

JUL 7V-JUN 75 


FISCAL TEA* 

1976 

JUL 75-JUN 76 


FISCAL YtA 


K TO CATE p,"* 


STATE 


1976 


1977 




_JUL 35-JUK 76 


OCT 76-SeF 77 


TOTAL. U.S. fj 


«l.JZ2,551 


$1.1*3.788 


Sl,<.99.061 


«1^J?9^06] 


31,599,908 


NOT CISTHaUTiO BY ST4T£ Zj 


77. 027 


101,.1. 


105,1167 


i05.*67 


117.16. 


STATE TOTALS ^ 


1, 2*5. 521. 


1,0^2.29^ 
72.551 


1,393, 59<. 


1,393.594 


I,*e2.7<.0 


ALABA-A 


*l,k21 


3-..6I.2 


3'.,6'.2 


'.2.805 


ALASKA 


12,627 


8,9<.7 


18!027 


18.027 


19,557 


APIZC'.A 


*,086 




2,729 


2,729 


Z.Z>.'. 




*7,lfe5 


36,007 


••1,236 




27,9f3 


C4LIF0-Nlt 


7e.5<.2 


'.<..9<i9 


91.065 


91,065 




CCLO>.«C0 


1I..B12 


1<.,8<.9 


19.1S<. 


19. 181. 


16.84* 




2. 31.1 




7,153 


7,153 




CELANlBt 


Z,<.2( 


1,657 


532 


5J2 




CTSTtlCT CF COLU"0I4 


»,5<.2 




3.130 


3,130 




FlORlOt 


»,369 


17,763 


37.962 


37,962 


53. ".27 


GEORGIA 


10.876 


1.2, *73 


2'., 309 


2<,,309 


22.805 


♦•tWAII 


2,55» 


2.862 


2,677 


2.677 


1».709 


ICAHC 


22.231 


20,291 


21,«77 


21,977 


12.172 


KLIKOIS 


50.067 


«i3,187 


«.9.787 


*9,787 


26,994 




30.515 


18,827 


20,«5<. 


20,55<. 


24,6^2 


ICXA 


13,870 


15,395 


2<.,217 


2*, 217 


23,367 


irAKSAS 


13,<.62 


H.,7ll 


23,937 


23,937 


25,294 




56,629 


31,13". 


52,529 


52,529 


81,999 


LCUIJIANA 


152,735 


97.025 


1«.1,251 


1*1,251 


124, J96 


^AlNE 


7<,t 


• 08 


2,122 


2,322 


659 




It. 019 


7,676 


15,500 


15,510 


15,054 


fASSACHUSEtlS 


12,193 


18,073 


21.528 


21,528 


22,231 


CICHICAN 


17,262 


6,521. 


13, A53 


13,4.53 


18.543 


MINNESOTA 


8,081 


7,«,85 


7.<i00 


7,000 




MSSIJ'ITI 


J2.5m 


26,607 


39. {".S 


39,6*5 


63,374 


fISSCURI 


57,878 


56,1,12 


102,*<.3 


102, **3 


102, J*5 


MONTANA 


22,567 


18,523 


26, €51 


26,651 


7,277 


•NEBRASKA 


6,773 


<.,102 


7,570 


7,570 


15,021 


»EVACA 


5,800 













kfH HAMPSHIRE 


330 


• 73 


5.552 


5.552 


4*5 


NEN JERSEY 


11,51,2 


1I..322 


12,666 


12.666 


21,519 


».FN MEXICO 


111,503 


10.8i><. 


3,767 


3,767 






5*, 980 


12,768 


31.765 


31,765 


61,63b 


kCRIM CAROLINA 


• ,1.78 


19,17<. 


22,895 


22,895 


3U.706 


kCBTH DAKOTA 


<>,6<.Z 


*,<.39 


11.228 


11,228 


6,872 


OVIO 


51,965 


33,300 


39,072 


39,072 


33.410 


CKLAfOHA 


2T.217 


20,71,2 


t.9,2'.fc 


*9,2<.6 


36,676 


CREGCN 


15,893 


39,830 


52,(51. 


52,854 


32,573 


fEKNSTLVANI* 


76,019 


61.89<. 


79,165 


79.165 


110,965 


fiHOOL ISLAND 


380 


389 


336 


336 


229 


SCUTf CAROLINA 


7,270 


7.0<.7 


9,519 


9,519 


9,305 


SOUYt- CAKOTA 


3,077 


2.119 


2.t.28 


2, 028 


1,713 


TENNESSEE 


22,180 


13,972 


12,3*0 


12,31.0 


10,250 


TEXAS 


«l,OkO 


t.6.276 


«i7.«.ll 


*7,*11 


56.422 


LTAN 


8,551 


626 


173 


173 


260 


VERNCNT 


203 


210 


Ei.1 


«*1 


379 


VIRGINIA 


16,863 




12.A31 


12,*31 


36,510 


NASMINCTON 


»1,197 


J8I201 


115.379 


115,379 


114,338 


NEST VIRGINIA 


12.791 


I1.S57 


22.053 


22.053 


16,614 


ViSCCNSIN 


11,181 


9,133 


9. <21 


9.221 


2,753 


NTOt-ING 




• 


«i2 


hZ 


154 



A-34 



FOOTNOTES : 

a/ NOTES ON COVERAGE: It ie emphasized that data on prime contracts by state do 
not provide any direct indication as to the state in which the actual production 
vork is done. For the majority of contracts with manufacturers, the data reflect 
the location of the plant where the product will be finally processed and assembled. 
If processing or assembly is to be performed in more than one plant of a prime 
contractor, the location shown is the plant where the largest dollar amount of 
work will take place. Construction contracts are shown for the state where the 
construction is to be performed. For purchases from wholesale or other distribution 
firms, the location is the address of the contractor's place of business. For 
service contracts, the location is generally the place where the service is performed, 
but for transportation and communications services the home office address is 
frequently used . 

More important is the fact that the reports refer to prime contracts only, and 
cannot in any way reflect the distribution of the very substantial amount of 
material and component fabrication and other subcontract work that may be done 
outside the state where final assembly or delivery takes place. 

The report includes definitive contracts and funded portions of letter contracts 
and letters of intent, job orders, task orders, and purchase orders on industrial 
firms, and also includes interdepartmental purchases, made from or through other 
governmental agencies, such as those made through the General Services Adminis- 
tration. The state data include upward or downward revisions and adjustments of 
$10,000 or more, such as cancellations, price changes, supplemental agreements, 
amendments, etc. 

The estimated amounts of indefinite delivery, open-end or call-type contracts for 
petroleum are included in the report. Except for petroleum contracts, the report 
does not include indefinite delivery, open-end, or call-type contracts as such, 
but does include specific purchases or delivery orders of $10,000 or more which 
are placed against these contracts. Also excluded from the report are project 
orders, that is production orders issued to Government-owned-and-operated 
facilities such as Navy shipyards. However, the report includes the contracts 
placed with industry by the Government-operated facility to complete tVie 
production order. 

b/ Includes all contracts awarded for work performance in the United States. The 

United States includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, U. S. possession? , 
the Canal Zone, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Trust Territories of the 
Pacific, and other areas subject to the complete sovereignty of the U. S., but 
does not include occupied Japanese Islands. 

£/ Includes contracts of less than $10,000, all contracts awarded for work performance 
in the U. S. possessions, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Trust Territories 
of the Pacific, and other areas subject to the complete sovereignty of the U. S., 
contracts which are in a classified location, that portion of intragovernsiental 
contracts and directed procurements for foreign governments under The Foreign 
Military Sales Act entered into overseas, and contracts for the Civilian Health 
and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services. (CHAMPUS). 

d/ Net value of contracts of $10,000 or more for work in each state and the District 
of Columbia. 

£/ Civil Functions of the Army Corps of Engineers for flood control and rivers and 
harbors work. Civil Functions data are ahotm separately, and are not included 
in military functions tabulations. 

NOTE: Percentages may not add due to rounding. 

This pamphlet may "be reproduced without peraission. 

Issued Semiannually by 

Department of Defense 

Washington Headquarters Services 

Directorate for Information Operations 

and Reports 

January 27, 1978 



A-35 



(2)696T Rl 

STVnaiAIQNI 

aHODNI MOT 



(17)9^61 Ainr io 
sv aaAOidwam 



(g)5Z. M 

laN XVI 

aWODNI 

ivnaaaa 



Ni saivis ao 
'dod iMaaisa^i 



(1)5^61 

NI awooNi 
VII dvo Had 



SAViino 
VII dvo Had 

9£6T M 



SAViino 

9Z:6T M 



SAViino 
aivis 

TVIOI 



JrHOONONOOOCNinO^-rOt 

1 rH ,-( r~- ,H <j- en 



CO ro <j- CO rH - 



-iHi-Hi— ICN^O ,HrHm,-| 



l(N0^r^O^l^Of0<r00O^m^0.-^00a^r^CNl^D^O^DI— ir^co 



a>fMvo-^^ooin r^v£)roror-~voooN< 



CO cNi m CN 



(^ CM O O o^ c 



^ CO en o^ CO <3- - 



)iH\Dcr>ina\r^cooo 



Hoo<]-oo-<}-oo<ro'HmcNLnrHcooooooor^(Ti 



CM LO CO CO CM C 



rHCNlCOCMOvlCOiHi— I 

i<rr^ooiHf^OrHocovDo^ 



Hmrsior~^vDcsi>3-mommLniHrsjOfHcMomr^v£) 

Nr^rHO'-lrHfOO>OOrHOO ^CyiOO0000a3rHOO<Ti 

i-liHiHrHiH rH iH iHrH ,HrHtH 

1000COCO~^CN4C3>OOM^ LOOOCTiOOmcOOUOCO^ 



mr^incNi— (co<rr~-ococNiocNicNimoocor-i— iiHt^oocNco 
cNOO<fooLnrHr^>d-r^mr^om r^cor^incoo<rvor^<rco 
moof^co(TNOooocMLnm<3-Ln<r cOfH^-vj-incovoooiHco 



m^tiHooLncovDcMo^oovoco co^^o^o^m<^■^JO-^^^o^uo 



THOOiHinOmiHCNCvlOCrHCMiH OO^^COOCMOOI^O^<1■C 
I^^OOOCN|COO^OCMCO^^m»X)Cy^ CT\COCOO><NCOCOt^r~-mf 

tncooooNcoincor^-crcTvCNrHt— I cMOf^csicNi<yir^<i-r^^c 



m iH CO CM i-i <J- I 



^\£)cocoln<tr^ooa^Oln 



C O -H (1) 4J 

O CO O CO -H T3 -H • 



cO^OC^-it-icU^M-HM'HOCcO conmcut-^co-HO) 

^wNco-Hocc04J>-iv^cox:-H-Hcoco.ui-HC>-;mx:c 

COcO-H^.HrHC'-IWOO^cO.HTJ&CC ^-HKjCnOC 

,-l,H>j>-(coooa)-H>H(Uco'OrHc:oco <uocg<cg'rjd 



saaa iviidSOH 



(3)^7^61 NI 

oNVi aamo 



(2)0Z6T NI 

va^v oNvi 



(3)V^6T NI 

iNaRAOi<iKa 

NVniAIO 

ivaaaaj 



(3)<7Z:6I NI 

iNawno^Na ioohds 
•Das 'waia 



(3)<7^6T NI 

99 SNosnaa 



(3)<7^6I NI 

SNvaaiaA 

ONIAIl 



crt fl 03 ^1 T) 4-1 Vj o :d ffl .H 01 ,v; (Tt '-J ^ •" ■_■ 

6 (fl c c/; o tfl u « -I 'O -H •-< o CI c/1 u •-' --•; u 60 '/. 

03 ^ c c "j-i ^-^ o 5 'M — 1 oo — I c d ^ t^ 3 cfi (u f-J ,Tj -H ai 

JD 0"/ N cfl -H O C 0) 4-1 Vj 1-1 f.' ^ -I--- ' n.i to iJ 'H C ►>: W ^ d 

';5roT-(^n-irHd'-ia)OOSa}--('a5dC3-r^c;,(/iud 
^rHPs-icDOOaj''-''-<tun3X)^dO(T)ciJO(};'5t5-H-rj 

cx3i— ir-r^oo-*c^oororH<rcNm<f~*cMrooomovor^cN 

iH OOiHiH fOcN mCMiHrHiHtH CNCOCOCNI 

OrHvOLOcMrHoo<rc^CT\r^c^oosa-rocNiv£><3-,— ir^cTioor^vo 

0^0^0^ 0^ • • •o^O^O^ • • 

<t 

Or^^~-^^mt^oooo^^OI^o^u-)OO^^o-)<roocNlln<r^^<J■ln 

tHvOCntH<r(N ^--^rH CNIiHrH,HCNiH.H rHCN 

o^^^vo^^o-)oooocT^I^cNr^r-.^o<^ooln■<r^^I^o^c^^lomcN 
cNi cNi <r<rmcMCN«*iHcNirocNrHrofnro<r<rcv4i— I 

tHinrHr>-OOr^OOCN<J-OOt^Of^a\v£)r^OOrOrHm-d-C^OrH 
CNI r-l Oi— I CMCNCNlrH OOrH i— llH (NCNJCNiH 

Lnomr^cMOLOOrHCT\OomvOiHvo<f<roocNirn-<3-r^vO 

r-H <r CNI fO CN f^ mj iHC^-d- CN|fOf^CNCN<t>HiHTHCN 

vDcNI^omcNmf^co<^cN<i•<r<r^-<romcJ^lrlO<»^^o 

rH iHiHCTi'HiH COCM lOCNi-Hi— liHrH CNICN^TCN 

cN^^Ofnr^ooo-)vomo^>X)^^c^JlO.^LncM<rcJ^oo^^o^^c30 

CNimf^Cn CMCN-<r<d- rH<r-<l- iHCSIfOCNiHO-lrHrH M 

r~-/— ^oc^^I^c3^•<^cM^ooocJ^cNoocM<J■r^f*^^^LOvDL^o^^o 

. CTi 

I— l^^r^t^c^ iH mi— i m(N>HtHrHiH .hoococn 

c7^>^cNC30cN■<r^cx)m<rcx)^cNmcsJI^^^Of^vo<roooL^ 

iHunrOCN rOCN-3-<r i— l<r<r iHCNCMCMCNimcNi-H iH 

<]•I^oo^ooc^JOfO<J•ooo-)on-<rlnc^'^<rmlnI^ooo^ 

i-H iH ,H.H.H <rcN mcNrHiH,H,H CNrO-^tH 

on.H,HcNrHoOrHr^iHoovo<rfomiH\oo»*cNoo<}-or--(T. 

CMinc^f^ CNCvJ-<3-<t iH-d--<r rHCNCOCslCNirOtHrH .— I 



(^7) 



(3)6961 NI 

STVnaiAIONI 

aWOONI WOT 



9L61 'Ainr io 
sv aaAoidHaNii 
10 ^aaHTiN 



(g)SZ. M 

laN XVI 

awooNi 

Tv^aaaa 



(T)5A6T 

NI saivis ao 
'dod iNaaisan 



(T)g£6T 

NI aHODNI 

VII dVD Had 



SAViino 
viidvo Had 

9Z6I M 



SAViino 

9^61 M 



SAViino 
aivis 

IVIOI 



coln^o^~-<No^Jl^oo^o^-~cooo^^o^lr|-*cN<l•^—lmvl•csmcM 



r CO o- <r .H CO 
oovDroLnfOro^<r(T\^fsjvDforooovD.-icNir-~v3-.^cMr^o 



-comvoc^40o^o^-3•^vocNCM^^o^I— iinuo 



>-^<fmmvOf^Of^tHio<3-cocoor^v^cvicor^ 



ivoor^O^tOvcmr^covOvOf^cN 



cofnrHoooorovooocNrofnoovOv£>r~^«*m-<rr^c^vD«3-c 



^»*>*u-ir-~or^o>^voo<J'Lnf^^vor^ 



■^1— l-^fMCOrOCNf^f^CslfOC 



OCNir^r--cNjv£>mmcooomcv4rn»;fOvot^rorHv£>«3-r^vrcN 

COO^mO^^-^!— lv£)-<rOOOOCXD-^i— IOOm<^CS|CTi-*'HOOCTi 
I— IrHtHiHiHrHi— ICNCNiHi— IrHrHiHtHiHi— It— liHiHiHi— ICNCS 



<mcntnromr^r-roof^mcMo\i 



< CO <y, ctn in cs ON r 



cyioocNjcoi— lOi— icn,— l0^^omr^<3■lncoooocMo^r^oooo^n 

LnmfO<fvO<fOOOO<fi— !rO.HLnfOrH<J-<)''<)-\O00-^CO-d-rH 

oooMo^ocMCM<^•^DOI^^^<^cMf^<toovD^oa^^^<r-* 
<tONtH.— l^r^mc^JO^^^H(^J^fnvOI^-d■I^vO(^'— I or-- 



a 










c 


>. 


o 




o 


n 








C 03 


o 


O 










Ci 


o. 












n) 


CJ 




^-1 










03 M 


u 


^ 


(1) 












•H 




^ 




o- 


rn 




V, 


CTl 


01 




^ 




> w 


01 


01 


fl) 








0) 4J 


f/i 




cfl 




R 


i^ 


X 




O 


O 








C3 














rn 


D 


ri 




m 


en 


0) 


^ 


o 








o 




>^ 






w 






C 


C C 




O 


CD 


m 


Ti 


PC 


•-) 


>-' 


42 


x: 




^ 




m <u 


JC 


s: 


tu 


W 






•H tH 


en 


cn 




u 


01 














o 


03 




C 'O 


+J 




s 


01 


-G 


^ 


M^ 




tn 


n 


,n 


> 


;^ 


p? 


r? 


[^ 






•H 


T-H 


(1) 


C o 


p 




c 


X 


01 


U CO 




•H 


o 


(1) 


0) 


0) 


ni 


ni 




n 


o 


n 


,"<; 




^S 


o 


o 


(1) 


q; 




0) 




S 


S 


S 


13 


Z 


2; 


2 


Z 


2 


a 


2 


o 


o 


o 


C/3 


CO 


H 






> 





A-38 



(3)£^6T NI 

saaa iviidSOH 

JO 'ON 



(3)^7^61 NI 

oNvi aaNMO 
ivnaaaj 



(3)0^61 NI 



(3)V^6T NI 

iNaKAOi^a 

NVniAID 

ivnaaaa 



(3)i7Z.6I NI 
XNaHllOHNa lOOHOS 

•Das -waia 



(3)^7^:61 NI 

HaAO 9 'SHA 

59 SNOS^ad 



(3)VZ.6T NI 

SNV^aiaA 

ONIAIl 



fO a\ iH iH r 



c cc o o c 

(D ,-( Vj A' CU O 

f-j .-* M O O '/! iJ T-i feO 

OCX W C C C 

x: o ^n (\j jr. x: 01 V) o -h -h 
tfl tvOc'O-i-'.i-' c f?J= S CiO^ 

t-ioiconncxccl-'v^m 
jsdi-<(Ux:ooaja)4J<y-Hrt 



looo^Ln^Ol^<romcn^,H 



I »cr CM -J- v£) ^ fo r^ 



>cN<f-J-mO'— la^r~-co,'-vo^^— icNi<rcof^i— ICTN 



n 










,r. 


>. 


o 




o 


o 




CL 




















rM 














P- 


(/5 




V, 


Cfl 


<r. 










--V: 




(■; 








CJ 


c 




!/) 


3 


c 








(U 


CJ 


o 










O 


CO 


2 


-a 


K 






>- 


^ 


X 


o 








^ 


> 


r* 


pt 


r* 


'3 












o 


(1) 


(iJ 


a; 


(1) 


OJ 




o 




x: 


2^ 


:si 


X. 


;s 


;^: 


X?: 


22 


:^ 


2 


ii 


;a 




-H 


<r 


cr, 


r^ 


<N 


<r 


CN 


<t 


<f 


CO 


<r 


as 


.H 


ovT 










CO 




^ 


rg 




<T 


<T> 


CN 


v£) 


<J- 


CTN 


as 


o 


o 


^ 


^^ 


CN 


vO 




■"^ 


<d- 


CO 


<r 


CO 


.H 


<f 




'"' 


<f 




^ 


"^ 


VD 


-1 


o 

00 


.H 


CTN 


^ 


ON 


"? 


"? 


CTi 


^D 


CVJ 


ON 


in 


CN 


CO 


in 


o 


CM 


CO 


O 


O 








f) 






<r 




<t 


CvJ 




<!■ 



■vomocor^inooofooovo- 

■>* COCMi— (CO,— I.— icol-^ 



oo»*>^\OfOcoino<finc^ina\<TiOini— i<fooin<rrsiooo 



jcsi<rt^co^<rvr)co<j-fOcocNOv£>-<j-cocooNOOvDcNicor 



- CO On CM <r -d- <r 



Csj CN CO C30 I 
CTi CN <f r 



1 o <r o r-t ^ 



c»<d-cor^co<rcxDLnv£>.Hc 



H vO r-i CN in 



JOmiHcooo-d-incNrvJON 



00 CN in r 



jininOoNCTvcNinoovoi 



(3)6961 NI 

sivnaiAiaNi 

aO^OONI MOT 



(i7)9^6T 'ATIir dO 

sv asAoidP^m 



(g)5^ M 

xaN xvx 

aRODNI 

TVHaaaa 



(T)^^6T 

Ni saivis ao 
'dOd XNaaisa^ 



(■ng£6T 

NI 3W0DNI 
VlldVO Had 



SAViino 

VIIcIVD Had 
9£6I M 



SAVimo 

9Z:6T M 



SAVixno 
aivis 

TVXOI 



CM \D m 
^ ^ CN 
ro iH vo 



4J o e 

m CO o 



ex. m 
<; </> 



^ 




h 


•H TS 




•H 


OJ 


-^ § 




a 


H 


r. 


m 


0) >W 


Q) 


u 




a QJ 






CO 


a M 



O CO 

C 

>. O 



u 


C/2 


W ^-' 


w 


C/2 v^ 


M 


w 


M 


HJ 


0) 


ci 


ei 


CO 


<r 


LTI 


^O 


c^ 


00 


ON 


1 



A-40 



(2)eZ.6T NI 

saaa iviidsoH 



(3)<7Z:6I NI 

oMvi aamo 
TV^aaaa 






(2)V£6I NI 

iNawAoidi^a 

NVniAID 

Tvaaaaa 



(3)VZ6I NI 

iNawiiOMa looHOs 
•Das 'Haia 



(3)<7^6I NI 

HaAO "5 'SHA 

59 SNOS^a<I 



(3)VZ6T NI 

SNVHaiaA 
ONI An 



00 c 

> c 

c/1 CO o 



.50 



OOOOtHO'-IOromr-l>HO<J-u-iOOOOO ONrn<ffOOO 

cMiHini— iin<rooO'— i<rcT><rvDf^cttoovoor^cs ^^"HLOiJ^f^ 
L^mfOr^-^oo^oc^gOOcNt^llOO^O^oor^f^^^v£> ^^<t>ij~ioOi-h 



oror^moOv3-of^t-^-<riHoof^fOr^voc 



J 00 o^ <• lO I 



-H rH Or 



■CM^OO^nc^4^-ICMO^oOc^JC30<^m^omm<f^^ o^o^oo<3•ooa^ 



iNswdoiaAaa 
Nvam 

ONISnOH 



vor^oOr^mfOo^POor^CT^'^f 



- o -sf a> r^ in 



ro <r .H CM o r~< 



J <r -vT CN iH < 



cslvD<J•r^^^lnoo■<^fOOO^I^or^ooo-d■OvD^^ "^ 



O- 1^ 00 in (Ti iH 



NoixvDnaa 

'HXTVaH 



v£5c^lo^oc^lO<l•cNII^vDOfOf^o^'— imovomm 



^voinino\oincMCMv£)^in(Nooin<rof^csin 



o o r-- iH 00 CO 



r-\ 00 r-l CM CM CO C 



^ ^ ,H ^ ' 



(N (^ CM f^ CM r 



<c7Ninr^fOinr^cx3<j-oof^oO'X> 

<<r.H rHCM<J-rHCM-d-rOCMCMfO 



o ON C3> <T\ r-- in 



aHnxinoiHOV 



-roininc^o<3-rHooooin>d-<rc3NOcMfOc:jNror^ r^vomiHiHON 



OcMOmoNi-ir^cMrHOoorooooNCsiincoo-o-in m-d-ONc 



oocrifOso.HcMoO'Hi~^ooLn<rvo-d-rHr^ONcrN.Hc^ if!?^£i!!!]^^ 
rH<]-cncM oocoin.H <tcn mcNjcM.H.H^r'^'^^'"''"''"' 



) p O -H (U 4-1 CO 

jfiTawMococo -H 

) O CO O CO 'H TJ -H -H O 

3<4-l)-ia)>(-i-HW)>HO(:! 

' • - ^ - ■ t-i M CO x: -H •' 



l^rHrHC-HCnOOlS 



■HiHJ-iS-icOOOa)-. ..._ 

<:<:<<:ucjcjoppiho 



H XI S C C 3 



p CO 



Pi CO O C CO 






NOIIVHXSINIWdV 

SNvnaiaA 



NOIXVHXSINIWaV 

aovds 
oixnvNo^av 

TVNOIXVN 



NOIIVHISINIWaV 

saoiAHas 
TVHaNao 



ADwaov 
NoiioaxoHd 

IVINaHNO^IANa 



NOIIV^XSINIRaV 

iNaHdoiaAaa "s 
HD^vasan AO^aNa 



NOIlVDiOdSNVHX 






c o •-* o ^ 



nj 



o tfl o rt -r^ 13 .H -r-j o c; m 

x> If) ^ ^ -r^ o a (^ ^ ^ ^ '^ ^'' •'-■ •'-' T' ": 

m ttl -r-l ^ r-l I— I C rH Cfi O O I* C' •-< 'U ^'. -- 

,-4 rH M M n3 O O a» -H rH a c^ TJ --! C C ij 



ISi^iS 



40^C^lCOu~lO^<rf^CT^vOOOvOI— l<}"\£)»*CNlvOr^ r^ 



■cN<ri— iroov£><a--vr-^asr^iHOv£)vovD\oOfMoocN ■ 



■omcn<ror^c^iHcNioc^cMiHooo-OiHiof^-<rr^ 1 



oO(NvcmvocsiinrH>d-f^t*i< 



jr~»LncNim<toooor-^cMOvoaN ^ 



a^ -* CN VD rH 00 C 



^ ^ CO ^ ro CO 
<ooocNfM-j-oo<riooinovooomioco 



OOrHOiHr-^COOvOr^, 



H CM iH eg CN 



^oocM^^l^cNIOvD 



^^r^mL^cNvocNI^m-*'-^cNcs^f^mo^vDo^oococ3^^^o^om( 



m ^ 00 o c^ in c 



i-d-cgoovOfOvOiHi— i<Tii— i<r-*ro<yivom^o 



H CN iH CO r 



< CM iH CN CN ' 



CM iH CO CO eg iH in 



oooo<ro<rLno<toorooooocs)oocx5rHooo 



CO ONCS ro.— liH^ rH i— IfO iHCNJ r 



^m<rcNiHLn^i— l^o<rcv^r^LnfOoocNOOfOLrl0^o^o^<^^ 



coloi— ii— l^oo^o^vD<J•Lr|vOOcOl— ifsicNiro-d'cOi— l(Ti-d-r^Lncs 

CvJiH iH rHrHincN CNiHCMCNOO CN 



^oocNlr^>^ooo>d■^vo^ 



xNawaoiaAaa 
ONisnoH 



^o^cMco»d■oo<J•(^^cNIOvD^^^nCT^oo^ocna^-d■'^■<l•lOf 



3HVnaM "9 

Noiivonaa 

'HlTVaH 



rcom.— irHroincNirHcrimof*^oovo- 



J 00 >^ O CN I— I 



eg >d- fo in CM vD o r 



■lnmf0^o<l■m^^la^o^r-^c^^r^I— icgmi— I 



.r^oo<^■o<l■o^o^fOc 



< r^ vo O CM 



amiiinoiHov 



00O^cN<^P0O^0^^-»lnocM«^Ir 
CN r^ CO CO rH «N < 



J C3> vo m cTi L 



t^<a■ovo<^Jln(^J\ocNo^omo^-.I— lor^f^inf^Of^cTN^d-in 



ro CO in ^d" iH f^i 



>a- CO ,— I iH >d- cN « 



x: >^ o o o 



C n) o o 









en 


QJ 


a 




M 


^ 








en fH 


u 


,^ 


0) 








o oo 




01 




R- 


Cfl 


•H 


,^«i 


en 


en 




n 




> w 


en 


en 


0) 








en JJ »-i 


tfl 


.'<'. 




>-i 


X 


i-i 


C) 


o 








u 


Q 


en 








•H CJO -H 


c 


CO 


en 


en 


(IJ 


(1) 


o 








o 


c 


>^ 






CD 






G 


c c > 


en 


en 


T) 


X 


•-I 


:?^ 


>-' 


XI 


r 




x: 


o 


CD 0) 


^ 


Xi 


(1) 


CD 




o 




4-) 


M 


en 














o 




oi; 


C T3 




•u 


g 


en 


x: 






C 


^ 


> 


^ 


;$ 


15 


IS 


;-l 


>-i 


•H 


I— 1 


QJ 


C o 


3 


3 


X 


en 




>-i CD CD 


o 


(U 


0) 


0) 


(U 


0) 


n) 


o 


o 


,r; 


^ 


U 


^^ 


o 


o 


o; 


0) 


u 


dJ 


•H en QJ 


S 


Z 


z 


s 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


H 


H 


t=> 


> 


> 13 :2 



A-44 



/: >N o o o 
cfi a; u >-< ^ 

C w tfl a; cu a O 



C 03 O O 

> CO 03 to CJ 

t-i M cj o y; 

j= o en oj ^ j= 



o (iJa;<uaj(i)aioox:-!«!>-'<u-COOc;ai-u(U-Hco<UTM>> 
2:2z:2;2;z2;^2OOOCL,05c/2WHH»>>s:3:S3 



cNinr-^rOiHooiHcNinooinr 



r<i-i— ICO cNj<f cNoo -o-fn^r 



ivor^vor-oOi— ivOfOON 



CO m iH CN ro c 



NOIXVHISINIKaV 



NOixv^isiNinav 

3DVdS 

oixnvNOHav 

TVNOIIVN 



NOIIV^lSINIWaV 

saoiA^jas 

1VH3NaO 



ADNaOV 

NOIXDaiO^d 

TVXNaKNOHIANa 



NoixvaxsiNiwav 

xNawdOTaAaa "s 

HD^ivasaH AO^aNa 



oor^co<rcor^rHv£)cocr>vOi— iinvo<i-^cscMmcNcocy>ooocs 



OOOOCSCvlvOiHO^OOrHOOOiHCOOOr^OOOr 



CO cvj eg f-H r- CO r 



rH ^ rH vO O CO f 



O O <t O iH vO vO 



ii— lOcooocTicNioi— lo^^-fOI-^l^a^v£)^~.r 



^'^vooc^Jo^^^s^■I^o^r 



I in CM ON <j- r 



^m cNicsi cocs-^co <f<r 

HvOcsOOOOvOOi— lOOrHOmcMogi— ICM 



CO -vf ,H <r iH 

cM<r>HcsjiricocMr-i(Ninr^m<T\cgvO(N<Ti<f>d-rHOcx3<r-d-iH 



AHnsvaM 



NOIXVX^OdSNV^X 



>* CO <f - 
ominmoor^oovo-d-cviocor^cMooinoor^cTicsiinooo^d- 



co-^o--d-iHco cg<r 



1 CN m CO ^ CM CO «* 



A-45 



saoiAHas 

IVIDOS 

am '^'modiNH 
'NoiivDnaa 



xNawdoiaAaa 
ivNoioan 

QNV AIimWHOD 



NOIIVXHOdSMVai 
QNV aDHaWHOO 



aWlITIlDIHOV 



Aonawa QNV 

' XNaWNO^IANa 

' saonnosa^ 

IVNOIXVN 



AOOlONHDaX 

QNV aovds 
'saoNaiDS Tvaawao 



s^ivaav 
ivNOixvNaaxNi 



asNaaaa 

IVNOIXVN 



CNf^vOCJ^<l■0-^CN1^^0000^0cN•<rOOO^l— lf^LnONCNr^cy\00O 

iH I— It— li— I iHf^rH ONtHi— I I— li— I m<rrOiH CN 



r^ r^ r^ O in r 



)<l•o>-^m<ra^voooo<roomv£)r^cNvD^or 



H cTi I— I I— I m CO c 



r^mLncNIm^^cocNa^c^gl 



-mroLOLnvOfM-^i-HvocNivor 



H VD Cr> CN <Ti « 



\ \Ci CD as o o <m en 



CN CM rO CM iH cs 



jcN<-cx)crivDmMMooi^oco<i- 



cNCNOOc»crimr^cNmooo<d-m<tr^cNOOomrnoor^voro 



r^ iH I— I r-^ ro tH 



m iH .-H iH tH CN 



H r~- ^ ^ CT\ in r 



jcncNinCNOCNa\u-|rHr 



J rH C»^ M i-l CN CN 



cx^<xDo^Lr)u~|vovocNvOLno^<l■Lnmocx3-d■I^r^\or^OlOcnr^vo 



r--.CN<y'OfnOinOr^OOrOfniHrHv£>rOtHiHCTNOCMvDvOmvDm 
rO coco <N<r CO iHvOCM 

en 
\£)rOOC».HO>-d-in>Hv^O'— lOcJorooovooo-d-r-rocMCNvOiHin 

rOCN-<r CN-^iH COCO^ CNCNCOfOiH^l- .— ICNCNCNCN 

C^OrHrHirirHrO.— (vOvOCNfOOiH-CtCSir^OOOOmr^m^d-r^rH 

<r iH 00 ro ,-1 csi 

r^iHr^vocooocM^-cNOOLncyiLri-^oooOiricNCNOomt^r^iH 

CNinC^f^ fOrHCO CNC^CNfO CNCNI^>*l^<^CMl^CN rHOO 

vOvommoi^mcMCNiocoLTicNcxiLri-^ocNcNiooor^ooooN 



iH vD iH < 



J fO CN iH iH r 



CO 00 .— I rH r-l CO 



O -H (U W 



CO CO 



m d 
CO CO C 
(3 CO O lu w 

o c ^ >-i (u 

N CO -H O C 
•H ^ -H rH C ' 

t-i!-icOOO_.... _ - 
<3<;oOOQQpMOtC 



i ^ CO 2 ^ CO O 

i w a -H <: a ao CO 

3 c03W<UhJcO>H(U- 

Hc0tO4-t-MC>HC042C 

_ _ ^ ... J&CCS-HPslcnoc 

rH,q,co:a^coco^o^^^.Hg: 



aoNVisissv 

ivosij 3so<rand 

ivnawao onv 

3NIHVHS anwaAa^ 



XNaMwaaAoo 
ivnaNao 



aoixsnr qnv 
iNawaoHoaNa twi 



saDiAHas 

QNV siiaawaa 

SNvnaxaA 



Axinnoas 

aHOONI 



03 



' Xi 



) a; tfl 



e cc c 

Cfl ^ O C ^J-' >^ Ol ^'. »-J TH DO -H 

Cu 0.' -r-l ^. '-' ,-1 C --• CTj C O S 

^ ^ u, 1-. (t o O a' -H ^ <U re - 



LriiHfnromLOvOiHrHo>vOr 



I Ni ^ J 2: ::^ ; 



:-^2 



^vOlOCMvO CNvCOOCOas 



incMOOiHOcoro-vtoo- 



•vOCTNCsl<J\LriiHvOCT\ OOO-^OO 



^ CM .H rn -d- ( 



-00 00 lo vo m a^ 



oncn)u^-<i-tHOOvDi— i^vOrHcNcNi-d'CNiooLnr^LOCNmr~~-o>r^r 



Of^OO<-~d-CN100CNfn<rv£>OOCNOf^v3-OOrOmiO^ <J\vOCNlL 

.H r-\ O -H ' C 

vo<tm<yicNCNioocrir 
CM >3- I— I m cNi cNj <r 

CM iHrHrHrHrH CsJ-^TCM rOrH.-HrHr-Ht-i*iHCOCOrH.HCM 

r^rHvocOiHr^cor^vo^ti— i^fro^iHiH-ctmcMooco cyi00<T>Orsi 

I— ImcMCNI CMCOvcTrH iH<r^ CMCOCOr^JCMCOcsl iHCOi— i 

r-^rHO'Hr^ococMOOrH^rro.Hogmor-.vDiniH r-oov£),H>d- 

iH I— liHCTNiHi— I iHinCNl mcMi-Hi— liHiH CMCslCOiHi— ICM 

...,,..,,_, _ .- ,:^li-l\r)rslm^-^mlr^co,-J(r^p^ 
I LO C^ CO CO CM <r f 



CNiincof^in<roc30CNjv£30c»mLrioO(>J\ocNf 



ivioos 

QNTV '-aaMOdNVK 

'NOiJLVonaa 



^\£)romoocNiro<tvOcoro-^i 



ir~-r^r^roooooot^cN 



XNawdoiaAaa 
iVNOioa^ 

QNV AXINnWWOO 



oovof^foooi— io>vDLnvOiHcTN<TNvo^Dcrir^vo<tc 
CNicNi<J-CNi rocN in ■— i CNi<r 



fn <r <r <r r-{ 



NOIXVIHOdSNV^X 

cmv aonawwoD 



arninnoiHOV 



vor^fO<rfnLrirnvo<tooiooomoO'<J"^f^\£>t^vDr^oo^f*^ 



v£)Or^^-d■^lno^c^^o^fO^^O'^oo•<rof^<t'^o^oor^JOcn 



AO^aNa QNV 
'XNaMNOHIANa 

'saonnosaH 

IVNOIXVN 



C3^ <]■ r^ f^ m r 



^<t^ooI— ir^oc^cTi-d-omooiHO-d-vooooo 



oo I— I Lo 1— I <r r 



) ^r "H 0> CM 



Or^,H.HcNlt^\ocooo^rHcNlln(^JI^I^co<ro^ooo.^Ov3■r 



AOOlONHOaX 

QNV aovds 
'saoNaiDS ivaaNao 



SHivaav 

IVNOIXVNdaXNI 



asNaaaa 

aVNOIXVN 



OogOiHLOOOOOOCMrOr 



!• -cr -<r cN o r 



I rH LO CM CNl r 



<ooooo<roovor^rHr^o 



1000r~~-CMvOiHrslLnr 



rcNimcn ro^ <j-rom 



(U 



rC >. O O O 

m 0) o (-1 ^ 

a, m -H 4*: m 03 

e ^ X ^ o o 

CO (U <U O 

K •-) IS >H ^ 4= 



c W CO 
w M CO 
c ^ > 





> Cfl 


CO 


CO 


(ij 






c; 




Cfl 


c 


>. 






en 


o 


en 0) 


X 


x: 


01 


00 


c -a 






d 



c c C > C fl 



8-g 



) > > :s :s ^ !3 

















-V 


















R-l^ 




.SL 


n'. 


tr. 




^ 








rVi 


V, 










C-S 














tn 




rC O 


n< 





















tTi 




3:: '1 








jr 




























n 






r 






n 




:? s 


^ 












«u 













(U 0) 




m 
















i! 


S 


i3 


i2 




>^ 


2^ 


;.s 


'^-. 












CM 


<f 


rH 


csj m 


CN 


r-« 


00 


iH 


CM 


vO 


•<1- 


iH 


CN 



3 n c X 01 ^ '-' w i-T ^ o 
o c cj oi *-- cu --I jii Si rj >• 



r r^ ro o 00 r~^ c 



aONVlSISSV 

TVDsij asociand 

ivaawao QNV 

ONiHVHS anNaAa>i 



-d■^ocMO^O^vOvD^OfO00t— lmO-<ff^-^0Cv£)vDf^O^CT\<tCsl 



OCM rOrHrHin ,H ,H- 



J ^D \£) CTi <f PO C 



CM I— I CN 



iNawMaaAoo 
ivHaNao 



CTi 00 >H 00 > 



>vDOiH<r-<rr^cocM^iH<rcx)0'HoomoocOr 

OOrHCO <r rH^TiHCNiH'H 



lc^r^cx)-d■vD>sDf^mcJ^cT^lncN iHi— loomoo 



<}-<ro-)CNjiHinooo<]-cNicri\£>r^mr^f^mooro<j-r^or^iHr 



aoiisnr qnv 
iNawao^oaNa wvi 



1 m cNi O r^ c^ r^ r^ I 



saoiA^as 

ONV siiaaNaa 

sNV^axaA 



ror^co<j-cnr^iHv£)mcT>^tHm^-3--<tcNicMincNifncr>ooocNi 

CS r~-og rOnHiH-^ t— 1 CSlvO CNiHiHrH 



ioc30r^-d-cNinc7NC 



Aiimoas 
aMooNi 



•>d-mcNii— icMr^f^iHcNLOiHc^cyNvOLnc 



I >d- vo vo >^ r^ CO ctn c 



Maryland Department of 

Economic and Community Development 

2525 Riva Road, Annapolis, Maryland 21401 

Blair Lee III, Acting Governor • Herbert B. Cahan, Secretary 

Price $10.00 

Maryland Statistical Abstract — 1977 



3 1430 02flMfl317 2 | 



-3U^J2.^H>^.^J72b